I need the c or c++ source code of a function like betarand(a,b) that produces random number with beta distribution . I know that I can use boost library but I'm going to port it for CUDA architecture so I need the code. Can somebody help me?
Meantime I have betapdf(Beta Probability density function). But I don't know how to use it for creating random numbers :).

  • hmm, I guess by definition if numbers are produced in some manner that they can be characterized as part of a distribution, they must not be random. :) but anyway.. does this beta function work for you? – Mike Mar 1 '13 at 19:25
  • @Mike, which definition? Do you imply that the linear distribution is "more random" than any other distribution? – Kos Mar 1 '13 at 19:30
  • According to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… you can generate a Beta distribution from 2 Gamma Distributions. Since C++11 provides a gamma distribution, it should be possible to use them to create a beta distribution. – Dave S Mar 1 '13 at 19:32
  • @DaveS Just what I'm doing right now... – Joseph Mansfield Mar 1 '13 at 19:34
  • @Mike : rk_beta ? so what's the rk_state parameter :D? – s4eed Mar 1 '13 at 20:03
up vote 15 down vote accepted

The C++11 random number library doesn't provide a beta distribution. However, a beta distribution can be modelled in terms of two gamma distributions, which the library does provide. I've implemented a beta_distribution in terms of std::gamma_distribution for you. As far as I can tell, it fully conforms with the requirements for a Random Number Distribution.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <random>

namespace sftrabbit {

  template <typename RealType = double>
  class beta_distribution
  {
    public:
      typedef RealType result_type;

      class param_type
      {
        public:
          typedef beta_distribution distribution_type;

          explicit param_type(RealType a = 2.0, RealType b = 2.0)
            : a_param(a), b_param(b) { }

          RealType a() const { return a_param; }
          RealType b() const { return b_param; }

          bool operator==(const param_type& other) const
          {
            return (a_param == other.a_param &&
                    b_param == other.b_param);
          }

          bool operator!=(const param_type& other) const
          {
            return !(*this == other);
          }

        private:
          RealType a_param, b_param;
      };

      explicit beta_distribution(RealType a = 2.0, RealType b = 2.0)
        : a_gamma(a), b_gamma(b) { }
      explicit beta_distribution(const param_type& param)
        : a_gamma(param.a()), b_gamma(param.b()) { }

      void reset() { }

      param_type param() const
      {
        return param_type(a(), b());
      }

      void param(const param_type& param)
      {
        a_gamma = gamma_dist_type(param.a());
        b_gamma = gamma_dist_type(param.b());
      }

      template <typename URNG>
      result_type operator()(URNG& engine)
      {
        return generate(engine, a_gamma, b_gamma);
      }

      template <typename URNG>
      result_type operator()(URNG& engine, const param_type& param)
      {
        gamma_dist_type a_param_gamma(param.a()),
                        b_param_gamma(param.b());
        return generate(engine, a_param_gamma, b_param_gamma); 
      }

      result_type min() const { return 0.0; }
      result_type max() const { return 1.0; }

      result_type a() const { return a_gamma.alpha(); }
      result_type b() const { return b_gamma.alpha(); }

      bool operator==(const beta_distribution<result_type>& other) const
      {
        return (param() == other.param() &&
                a_gamma == other.a_gamma &&
                b_gamma == other.b_gamma);
      }

      bool operator!=(const beta_distribution<result_type>& other) const
      {
        return !(*this == other);
      }

    private:
      typedef std::gamma_distribution<result_type> gamma_dist_type;

      gamma_dist_type a_gamma, b_gamma;

      template <typename URNG>
      result_type generate(URNG& engine,
        gamma_dist_type& x_gamma,
        gamma_dist_type& y_gamma)
      {
        result_type x = x_gamma(engine);
        return x / (x + y_gamma(engine));
      }
  };

  template <typename CharT, typename RealType>
  std::basic_ostream<CharT>& operator<<(std::basic_ostream<CharT>& os,
    const beta_distribution<RealType>& beta)
  {
    os << "~Beta(" << beta.a() << "," << beta.b() << ")";
    return os;
  }

  template <typename CharT, typename RealType>
  std::basic_istream<CharT>& operator>>(std::basic_istream<CharT>& is,
    beta_distribution<RealType>& beta)
  {
    std::string str;
    RealType a, b;
    if (std::getline(is, str, '(') && str == "~Beta" &&
        is >> a && is.get() == ',' && is >> b && is.get() == ')') {
      beta = beta_distribution<RealType>(a, b);
    } else {
      is.setstate(std::ios::failbit);
    }
    return is;
  }

}

Use it like so:

std::random_device rd;
std::mt19937 gen(rd());
sftrabbit::beta_distribution<> beta(2, 2);
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
  std::cout << beta(gen) << std::endl;
}
  • Hi there. Hope you still read this after a couple of years, but if I'm not mistaken reading this generation prescription: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… the generate function should return x_gamma(engine) / (x_gamma(engine) + y_gamma(engine), and not use the same x value twice. – Daniel Jun 21 '16 at 14:54
  • @Daniel I have been inactive on Stack Overflow for a few years now and I'm finally looking over any comments on my posts. Now I'm a bit worried in case anyone's used this implementation and it being possibly incorrect - however, I tried implementing it instead as you've described and it does not appear to generate the appropriate distribution. As it is in this answer, however, the distribution appears to be correct. Unfortunately, I cannot find a good source that shows whether the X gamma distribution is sampled once or twice. If you have any more info, please let me know! – Joseph Mansfield Dec 19 '17 at 11:19

Maybe you can use the code that gsl uses for producing random numbers with the beta distribution. They use a little weird way of produging them, as you have to pass a random number generator to the function, but surely you can get what you need.

Here's the documentation and the web page

Boost "inverse incomplete Beta" is another fast (and simple) way to simulate Betas.

#include <random>
#include <boost/math/special_functions/beta.hpp>
template<typename URNG>
double beta_sample(URNG& engine, double a, double b)
{
  static std::uniform_real_distribution<double> unif(0,1);
  double p = unif(engine);
  return boost::math::ibeta_inv(a, b, p); 
  // Use Boost policies if it's not fast enough
}

Check out the random number generator implementations in NumPy: NumPy distributions source

They are implemented in C, and work very fast.

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