16

This is an interview question.

Find the Kth smallest element in a matrix with sorted rows and columns.
Is it correct that the Kth smallest element is one of a[i, j] such as i + j = K ?

  • how is the matrix sorted? only that in each row or column is the number increasing? – V-X Mar 2 '13 at 21:19
  • Yes, the numbers in each row and column are sorted in increasing order. – Michael Mar 2 '13 at 21:21
  • It's very easy to come up with a counterexample to show that the statement is false. – NPE Mar 2 '13 at 21:21
  • the solution is obviously incorrect. eg. first element can be found at the corner but the second number can be one of the two neighbors. the third may be at one of 5 possible indices. you have to employ some modification of binary search. – V-X Mar 2 '13 at 21:23
33

False.

Consider a simple matrix like this one:

1 3 5
2 4 6
7 8 9

9 is the largest (9th smallest) element. But 9 is at A[3, 3], and 3+3 != 9. (No matter what indexing convention you use, it cannot be true).


You can solve this problem in O(k log n) time by merging the rows incrementally, augmented with a heap to efficiently find the minimum element.

Basically, you put the elements of the first column into a heap and track the row they came from. At each step, you remove the minimum element from the heap and push the next element from the row it came from (if you reach the end of the row, then you don't push anything). Both removing the minimum and adding a new element cost O(log n). At the jth step, you remove the jth smallest element, so after k steps you are done for a total cost of O(k log n) operations (where n is the number of rows in the matrix).

For the matrix above, you initially start with 1,2,7 in the heap. You remove 1 and add 3 (since the first row is 1 3 5) to get 2,3,7. You remove 2 and add 4 to get 3,4,7. Remove 3 and add 5 to get 4,5,7. Remove 4 and add 6 to get 5,6,7. Note that we are removing the elements in the globally sorted order. You can see that continuing this process will yield the kth smallest element after k iterations.

(If the matrix has more rows than columns, then operate on the columns instead to reduce the running time.)

  • that is Good..give an example when matrix is a set. No repeat elements – Grijesh Chauhan Mar 2 '13 at 21:30
  • very trivial, done. – nneonneo Mar 2 '13 at 21:33
  • PLease check my answer If I did correct. With my assumptions – Grijesh Chauhan Mar 2 '13 at 21:35
  • 2
    This solution works best if only row or column is sorted (essentially, it is n-way merge in external sorting). @user1987143's is better since it leverages the fact that both row and column are sorted. – sinoTrinity May 4 '15 at 22:41
  • 1
    You have defined number of rows as n then if you initialize your min heap with the first column, wouldn't the runtime be n + k log (n) ? (You don't seem to be considering that initialization step in your runtime calculation). – ChaimKut May 15 '15 at 14:51
22

O(k log(k)) solution.

  • Build a minheap.

  • Add (0,0) to the heap. While, we haven't found the kth smallest element, remove the top element (x,y) from heap and add next two elements [(x+1,y) and (x,y+1)] if they haven't been visited before.

We are doing O(k) operations on a heap of size O(k) and hence the complexity.

  • Can you give this some formatting? kind of hard to read as-is – StormeHawke Sep 23 '13 at 18:39
  • Are you sure this is correct? I mean even I think the same, just amazed by the no of votes received on your answer in contrast to the other, even though the complexity of your solution is better than the other. – Akashdeep Saluja Sep 27 '13 at 5:41
  • I think this is correct, can someone expert please confirm it ? – Harry Feb 17 '14 at 7:25
  • i think this is correct and the runtime is better than the accepted answer. – Meow Apr 3 '14 at 16:17
  • 1
    Agree that complexity is O(k log (k)). Rough explanation: Heap pop complexity is O(log(heapsize)). Here heap size starts at 1 and grows one by one to k in k iterations. Heapsize grows one unit in each iteration (for most iterations) because at every stage one element is removed and two i.e. right and down cells are added. (Except at the edges of the matrix) So, time complexity ~= O(log(1)) + O(log(2)) + .... O(log(k)) ~= k log(k) – Pranjal Mittal May 23 '17 at 23:13
1

Start traversing the matrix from the top-left corner (0,0) and use a binary heap for storing the "frontier" - a border between a visited part of the matrix and the rest of it.

Implementation in Java:

private static class Cell implements Comparable<Cell> {

    private final int x;
    private final int y;
    private final int value;

    public Cell(int x, int y, int value) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Cell that) {
        return this.value - that.value;
    }

}

private static int findMin(int[][] matrix, int k) {

    int min = matrix[0][0];

    PriorityQueue<Cell> frontier = new PriorityQueue<>();
    frontier.add(new Cell(0, 0, min));

    while (k > 1) {

        Cell poll = frontier.remove();

        if (poll.y + 1 < matrix[poll.x].length) frontier.add(new Cell(poll.x, poll.y + 1, matrix[poll.x][poll.y + 1]));
        if (poll.x + 1 < matrix.length) frontier.add(new Cell(poll.x + 1, poll.y, matrix[poll.x + 1][poll.y]));

        if (poll.value > min) {
            min = poll.value;
            k--;
        }

    }

    return min;

}
1

As people mentioned previously the easiest way is to build a min heap. Here's a Java implementation using PriorityQueue:

private int kthSmallestUsingHeap(int[][] matrix, int k) {

    int n = matrix.length;

    // This is not necessary since this is the default Int comparator behavior
    Comparator<Integer> comparator = new Comparator<Integer>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
            return o1 - o2;
        }
    };

    // building a minHeap
    PriorityQueue<Integer> pq = new PriorityQueue<>(n*n, comparator);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
            pq.add(matrix[i][j]);
        }
    }

    int ans = -1;
    // remove the min element k times
    for (int i = 0; i < k; i++) {
        ans = pq.poll();
    }

    return ans;
}
0

Seems this just uses the feature: every row is sorted, but not use its column-wise sorted feature.

0

Kth smallest element in the matrix :

The problem can be narrowed down as below.

if k is 20, then take k*k matrix (where answer will definitely lie.)

Now you can merge the rows in pair repeatedly to build a sorted array and then find the kth smallest number.

-1
//int arr[][] = {{1, 5, 10, 14},
//        {2, 7, 12, 16},
//        {4, 10, 15, 20},
//        {6, 13, 19, 22}
//};
// O(k) Solution
public static int myKthElement(int arr[][], int k) {
    int lRow = 1;
    int lCol = 0;
    int rRow = 0;
    int rCol = 1;
    int count = 1;

    int row = 0;
    int col = 0;

    if (k == 1) {
        return arr[row][col];
    }

    int n = arr.length;
    if (k > n * n) {
        return -1;
    }

    while (count < k) {
        count++;

        if (arr[lRow][lCol] < arr[rRow][rCol]) {
            row = lRow;
            col = lCol;

            if (lRow < n - 1) {
                lRow++;
            } else {
                if (lCol < n - 1) {
                    lCol++;
                }

                if (rRow < n - 1) {
                    lRow = rRow + 1;
                }
            }
        } else {
            row = rRow;
            col = rCol;

            if (rCol < n - 1) {
                rCol++;
            } else {
                if (rRow < n - 1) {
                    rRow++;
                }
                if (lCol < n - 1) {
                    rCol = lCol + 1;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return arr[row][col];
}
  • Please add some content to your answer to elaborate your approach or solution in addition to the code so that it would make better sense to anyone who is going through the answers. – kabirbaidhya Mar 22 '17 at 6:00

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