11

A few times in my program, I've had to check if a variable was one of many options. For example

if (num = (<1 or 2 or 3>)) { DO STUFF }

I've messed around with 'OR's, but nothing seems to be right. I've tried

if (num == (1 || 2 || 3))

but it does nothing. Please help! Thanks in advance.

P.S. I need to distinguish between several groups. For example...

if (num = (1,2,3))

else if (num = (4,5,6))

else if (num = (7,8,9))
  • 2
    Is if (num == 1 || num == 2 || num == 3) or if (num >= 1 && num <= 3) too much typing? If it's longer, you can always make some sort of array and use std::find. – chris Mar 3 '13 at 1:49
  • 1
  • Thanks for the quick responses. @Chris, I was just looking for something a little more elegant. – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 1:53
  • @Seth, thanks! I'll give it a try! – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 1:53
11

If the values you want to check are sufficiently small, you could create a bit mask of the values that you seek and then check for that bit to be set.

Suppose, you care about a couple of groups.

static const unsigned values_group_1 = (1 << 1) | (1 << 2) | (1 << 3);
static const unsigned values_group_2 = (1 << 4) | (1 << 5) | (1 << 6);
static const unsigned values_group_3 = (1 << 7) | (1 << 8) | (1 << 9);    
if ((1 << value_to_check) & values_group_1) {
  // You found a match for group 1
}
if ((1 << value_to_check) & values_group_2) {
  // You found a match for group 2
}
if ((1 << value_to_check) & values_group_3) {
  // You found a match for group 3
}

This approach works best for values that don't exceed the natural size your CPU likes to work with. This would typically be 64 in modern times, but may vary depending upon the specifics of your environment.

  • Cool. That makes thing easy. If I wanted to see "if 1; else if 2, else if 3;" how would I do that? Would I need a new bit mask, or could I just add in "(2 << n)"? – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 12:37
  • If you want to check values 1, 2 and 3, then your bit mask would become this instead values_i_like = (1<<1) | (1<<2) | (1<<3);. – Eric Johnson Mar 3 '13 at 12:48
  • no, you misunderstand. I want to be able to differ from (1,2,3) and (4,5,6) – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 12:51
  • values_i_like = (1<<1) | (1<<2) | (1<<3) | (1<<4) | (1<<5) | (1<<6); – Eric Johnson Mar 3 '13 at 12:54
  • but how would you distinguish from (1,2,3) and (4,5,6)? – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 12:55
30

Here's a way in C++11, using std::initializer_list:

#include <algorithm>
#include <initializer_list>

template <typename T>
bool is_in(const T& v, std::initializer_list<T> lst)
{
    return std::find(std::begin(lst), std::end(lst), v) != std::end(lst);
}

with that, you can do:

if (is_in(num, {1, 2, 3})) { DO STUFF }

It is not very efficient though when not used with built-in types. int will work fine, but if you compare std::string variables for example, the produced code is just awful.

In C++17 however, you can instead use a much more efficient solution that works well with any type:

template<typename First, typename ... T>
bool is_in(First &&first, T && ... t)
{
    return ((first == t) || ...);
}

// ...

// s1, s2, s3, s4 are strings.
if (is_in(s1, s2, s3, s4)) // ...

The C++11 version would be very inefficient here, while this version should produce the same code as hand-written comparisons.

  • That looks convenient, but I'm not using 11. I'm just in plain ol' C++. – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 12:24
  • 1
    std::initializer_list<T> can be passed by value. – Evg Aug 4 '18 at 7:13
  • @Evgeny Indeed. – Nikos C. Aug 4 '18 at 7:38
  • 4
    +1 for the stupendously good way to do this in C++17. I would +2 if I could because you bothered to come back 5.5 years later and add that! – underscore_d Sep 19 '18 at 21:19
  • 4
    The c++17 feature is called fold expression – GetFree Oct 1 '18 at 17:29
6

I just had a similar problem and I came to these C++11 solutions:

template <class T> 
struct Is 
{ 
  T d_; 
  bool in(T a) { 
    return a == d_; 
  } 
  template <class Arg, class... Args> 
  bool in(Arg a, Args... args) { 
    return in(a) || in(args...); 
  } 
}; 

template <class T> 
Is<T> is(T d) { 
  return Is<T>{d}; 
}

Or as alternative without the recursion terminating method. Be aware that here the order of comparisons is undefined and that this does not terminate early if the first match is found. But the code is more compact.

template <class T>
struct Is {
  const T d_;
  template <class... Args>
  bool in(Args... args) {
    bool r{ false }; 
    [&r](...){}(( (r = r || d_ == args), 1)...);
    return r;
  }
};

template <class T>
Is<T> is(T d) { 
  return Is<T>{d}; 
}

So for both solutions the code would look like:

if (is(num).in(1,2,3)) {
  // do whatever needs to be done
}
4

You have to do the comparison with each value. E.g.

if (num == 1 || num == 2 || num == 3) { stuff }

You may also want to consider a switch and intentionally falling through cases (although I don't think it's the best solution for what you're stating).

switch (num) {
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3:
        {DO STUFF}
        break;

    default:
        //do nothing.
}
  • Yeah, not exactly what I'm looking for. Thanks anyways! – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 2:11
  • 1
    Umm, no, you don't have to do that. – einpoklum Nov 26 '16 at 10:17
  • switch can only compare an integral or enumerator type, though, so while it does work - and often neatly - for such objects, it quickly reveals itself to be a one-trick pony, a relic of the assembler jump-table days, and not a general solution (and therefore not suitable for generic code, which is pretty important). – underscore_d Sep 19 '18 at 21:21
3

You can define a set of integers, add the desired values to it, and then use the find method to see if the value in question is in the set

std::set<int> values;
// add the desired values to your set...
if (values.find(target) != values.end())
    ...
  • That's an interesting way of doing things... I'll give it a try, thanks! – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 2:10
  • Sorry, I'm just getting a ton of errors. How exactly do you use this? Could you give an example? – Matt Reynolds Mar 3 '13 at 2:13
  • 2
    lol, genius in its simplicity! @TheWalkingCactus just use count instead with a set. – user1382306 Jun 27 '14 at 20:46
  • Simpler is to use count -- if (std::set<int>({1, 2, 3}).count(target)) {... – Chris Dodd Aug 4 '18 at 7:30
  • You can, but that's an awful lot of dynamic allocation, copying, and immediate destruction for a task so immensely transient and possibly frequent. That's compounded by how 'check if a value is in a set' is such a basic concept that it (A) arguably should be a basic feature of the language and (B) should be free to do. I guess (A) is not really needed when there are easy ways to write a helper function to do it, as others have shown, while also satisfying (B). – underscore_d Sep 19 '18 at 21:25
2

I needed to do something similar for enums. I have a variable and wish to test it against a ranges of values.

Here I've used a variadic template function. Note the specialisation for const char* type, so that is_in( my_str, "a", "b", "c") has the expected outcome for when my_str stores "a".

#include <cstring> 

template<typename T>
constexpr  bool is_in(T t, T v) {
  return t == v;
}

template<>
constexpr  bool is_in(const char* t, const char* v) {
  return std::strcmp(t,v);
}

template<typename T, typename... Args>
constexpr bool is_in(T t, T v, Args... args) {
  return  t==v || is_in(t,args...);
}

Example usage:

enum class day
{
  mon, tues, wed, thur, fri, sat, sun
};

bool is_weekend(day d)
{
  return is_in(d, day::sat, day::sun);
}
  • The specialisation for C strings is a nice touch (as it is hard to think when you would want the default behaviour of comparing pointers to that type), as is the presence of a concise and practical example! – underscore_d Sep 19 '18 at 21:27

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