12

This question already has an answer here:

x = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
y = [[1,0],[2,0],[3,0],[4,]]

I want to create a dictionary so the x and y values would correspond like this:

1: [1,0], 2: [2,0]

and etc

marked as duplicate by oefe, Jon Clements, Laurent Etiemble, Anujith, Stephan Mar 3 '13 at 13:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    Is this homework? We users of SO charge at least $400/hr for homework, with prices subject to user. – Snakes and Coffee Mar 3 '13 at 6:37
23

You can use zip function: dict(zip(x, y))

>>> x = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
... y = [[1,0],[2,0],[3,0],[4,]]
>>> dict(zip(x, y))
0: {'1': [1, 0], '2': [2, 0], '3': [3, 0], '4': [4]}
7

In python > 2.7 you can use dict comprehension:

>>> x = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
>>> y = [[1,0],[2,0],[3,0],[4,]]
>>> mydict = {key:value for key, value in zip(x,y)}
>>> mydict
{'1': [1, 0], '3': [3, 0], '2': [2, 0], '4': [4]}
>>> 

Still the best answer has already been given

dict(zip(x, y))

In python <= 2.7 you can use itertools.izip in case you work with big lists as izip returns an iterator. For small lists like yours, the use of izip would be overkilling. Note however that itertools.izip dissapeared in python 3. In python 3, the zip builtin already returns an iterator and in consequence izip was not needed anymore.

2

The quick and easy answer is dict(zip(x,y)), if you're ok with the keys being strings. otherwise, use dict(zip(map(int,x),y))

1

You can use itertools.izip to accomplish this.

from itertools import izip
x = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
y = [[1,0],[2,0],[3,0],[4,]]
dict(izip(x, y))

If your flavor of Python is 3.x, then you can use itertools.zip_longest to do the same thing.

from itertools import zip_longest
x = ['1', '2', '3', '4']
y = [[1,0],[2,0],[3,0],[4,]]
dict(zip_longest(x, y))    
  • So what's wrong with izip? – Makoto Mar 3 '13 at 6:44
  • I've already flagged this question as an exact duplicate, but I don't know why people have down-voted this answer. It's nearly identical to this highly up-voted similar answer. – Wesley Baugh Mar 3 '13 at 6:47
  • 2
    probably that 'Simple is better than complex' – joaquin Mar 3 '13 at 6:47
  • @WesleyBaugh good point. but note the answer was from 2008, five years ago. Dict comprehensions were included in py2.7, in 2010, and the dict(zip()) answer, that imho is the best, got x5 more votes and is the one selected – joaquin Mar 3 '13 at 6:54
  • 1
    @joaquin Using a dict comprehension doesn't change the fact that izip in py2.7 is still more memory efficient when dealing with large dictionaries. The down-vote tooltip says "This answer is not useful". The fact is, this answer is useful. – Wesley Baugh Mar 3 '13 at 8:01

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