5

I've made myself a game, just like Pong using SDL and OpenGL under c++:

#include "SDL.h"
#include "SDL_opengl.h"
#include <iostream>
int main(int argc, char* args[])
{
//initialize SDL
SDL_Init(SDL_INIT_EVERYTHING);

//OpenGL memory
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_RED_SIZE, 8 );
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_GREEN_SIZE, 8);
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_BLUE_SIZE, 8);
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_ALPHA_SIZE, 8);
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_BUFFER_SIZE, 32);
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_DEPTH_SIZE, 16);
SDL_GL_SetAttribute( SDL_GL_DOUBLEBUFFER, 1);

//caption of the window
SDL_WM_SetCaption( "Bine baaa", NULL );

//size
SDL_SetVideoMode(600,400,32, SDL_OPENGL);

//clearcolor
glClearColor(0,0,0,1); //RED,GREEN,BLUE,ALPHA

//portion of screen displayed
glViewport(0,0,600,400);

//for gradients
glShadeModel(GL_SMOOTH);

//2D rendering
glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity();//save

glDisable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);

bool isRunning = true;

SDL_Event event;

typedef struct player{

    float myX;
    float myY;
    float width=15;
    float height=60;
    bool up=false;
    bool down=false;
};
player player1,player2;

player1.myX=10;
player1.myY=160;
player2.myX=580;
player2.myY=160;

float ballX=300;
float ballY=200;
float vitezaX=0.5;
float vitezaY=0.5;
float latura =10;

//main loop
while(isRunning){
    //EVENTS
    while ( SDL_PollEvent(&event)){

        if( event.type == SDL_QUIT )
            isRunning=false;
        //escape button closes window
        if(event.type == SDL_KEYUP && event.key.keysym.sym == SDLK_ESCAPE)
            isRunning=false;
        if( event.type == SDL_KEYUP && event.key.keysym.sym == SDLK_r)
            glClearColor(1,0,0,1);
        if( event.type == SDL_KEYDOWN){
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_UP)
                player2.up=true;
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_DOWN)
                player2.down=true;
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_w)
                player1.up=true;
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_s)
                player1.down=true;
        }
        if( event.type == SDL_KEYUP){
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_UP)
                player2.up=false;
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_DOWN)
                player2.down=false;
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_w)
                player1.up=false;
            if(event.key.keysym.sym==SDLK_s)
                player1.down=false;
        }
    }
    //LOGIC
    if(player1.up==true)
        player1.myY-=0.3;
    if(player1.down==true)
        player1.myY+=0.3;
    if(player2.up==true)
        player2.myY-=0.3;
    if(player2.down==true)
        player2.myY+=0.3;
    if(ballY<0)
        vitezaY=-vitezaY;
    if(ballY+latura>400)
        vitezaY=-vitezaY;
    if(ballX+latura>player2.myX && ballY+latura>player2.myY && ballY<player2.myY+player2.height){
        vitezaX=-vitezaX;
        if(ballX+latura-player2.myX>=1){
                if(vitezaY>0)
                    ballY=player2.myY-latura;
                else
                    ballY=player2.myY+player2.height;
            vitezaX=-vitezaX;
            vitezaY=-vitezaY;
        }
    }
    if(ballX<player1.myX+player1.width && ballY+latura>player1.myY && ballY<player1.myY+player1.height){
        vitezaX=-vitezaX;
        if((player1.myX+player1.width)-ballX>=1){
            if(vitezaY>0)
                ballY=player1.myY-latura;
            else
                ballY=player1.myY+player1.height;
            vitezaX=-vitezaX;
            vitezaY=-vitezaY;
        }
    }
    if(ballX<0 || ballX>600){
         ballX=300;
         ballY=200;
         SDL_Delay(500);
    }
    ballX+=vitezaX;
    ballY+=vitezaY;

    //RENDER
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

        glPushMatrix(); //Begin Render

        glColor4ub(255,255,255,255);
        glOrtho(0,600,400,0,-1,1);

        glBegin(GL_QUADS);//GL_LINES, GL_LINE_STRIP, GL_QUADS, GL_POLIGON,GL_TRIANGLES, GL_LINE_LOOP

        glVertex2f(player1.myX,player1.myY);
        glVertex2f(player1.myX+player1.width,player1.myY);
        glVertex2f(player1.myX+player1.width,player1.myY+player1.height);
        glVertex2f(player1.myX,player1.myY+player1.height);

        glEnd();//End Draw

         glBegin(GL_QUADS);//GL_LINES, GL_LINE_STRIP, GL_QUADS, GL_POLIGON,GL_TRIANGLES, GL_LINE_LOOP

        glVertex2f(player2.myX,player2.myY);
        glVertex2f(player2.myX+player2.width,player2.myY);
        glVertex2f(player2.myX+player2.width,player2.myY+player2.height);
        glVertex2f(player2.myX,player2.myY+player2.height);

        glEnd();//End Draw

        glBegin(GL_QUADS);//GL_LINES, GL_LINE_STRIP, GL_QUADS, GL_POLIGON,GL_TRIANGLES, GL_LINE_LOOP

        glVertex2f(ballX,ballY);
        glVertex2f(ballX+latura,ballY);
        glVertex2f(ballX+latura,ballY+latura);
        glVertex2f(ballX,ballY+latura);

        glEnd();//End Draw

        glPopMatrix(); //End Render


    SDL_GL_SwapBuffers();
    SDL_Delay(2);
}
SDL_Quit();

return 0;}

NOTE: "latura" is the rectangle's width or height, "viteza" is velocity.

The problem is when i test the game on other machines, on my PC the game moves very slow even though i can say that my PC isn't that bad...(2GB RAM, 8600GT nvidia, and a quad core intel), on other machines the game is moving much faster, regardless of the code have been set at the same velocity. I just can't seem to find the logic under this issue. I want to know how to make this game to work at the same speed on different machines (i've looked for something such as time dependent animations...i don't know how much taht will help; i've also found some topics about software/hardware rendering, could this be the problem? that on my PC the game is using software rendering and on other machines is hardware base?).

2
  • Use a profiler to find out exactly where the bottleneck is before trying to optimize.
    – Cornstalks
    Mar 3, 2013 at 8:58
  • 2
    On other PCs is working fine but on yours it isn't? Then that's your problem.
    – user1944441
    Mar 3, 2013 at 9:01

3 Answers 3

11

The main problem I see is in your game loop. Why are you using a static delay of 2 milliseconds? That's your bottleneck right there. You're trying to render your game at 500 FPS on a machine that likely doesn't have hardware accelerated OpenGL drivers.

First things first, delay your game to something like 50 to 100Hz instead of the 500 you're using here. Start with a time keeping variable at the very beginning of your game loop.

Uint32 time = SDL_GetTicks();

Now we skip all the way to the very end for more code...

if(20>(SDL_GetTicks()-time))
{
    SDL_Delay(20-(SDL_GetTicks()-time)); //SDL_Delay pauses the execution.
}

It may look a bit confusing for anyone unfamiliar with SDL, but what this does is delay the code by an exact amount of time, no matter how fast the program goes through it's loop.

To explain it a bit better, let's say that the game loop takes 4 milliseconds (For the sake of argument alone, the loop is likely much faster in actuality) to make it from beginning to end. You're already adding 2 milliseconds onto it, so that makes the total delay 6 milliseconds, or ~130 FPS. Most modern computer displays only have a refresh rate of about 60Hz, or 60 frames per second.

By having the game loop as fast as it is, your game is rendering more than double the frames without even displaying most of them. It's extremely wasteful to think about, but let's look at the common solution above.

SDL_GetTicks() is a functions that tells you the current running time since initialization. You take a snapshot of this time at the very beginning of the loop to get your starting time. You then see SDL_GetTicks() again at the end and use that to compare against your starting value.

Let's say that the starting time is 15 and at the end the time returned by SDL_GetTicks() is 22. The equation compares 22 minus 15 first, 7, and compares whether that number is less than 20, which it is. It then pauses the system for 20 minus 7 milliseconds, 13.

This is useful because the framerate doesn't fluctuate wildly, and if the game loop speed takes longer than 20 milliseconds to reach the end, it doesn't delay it at all, which means you'll never waste precious processing power or frame rendering with it.

Instead of 20, you can also replace it with (1000/FPS) where FPS is the... well... FPS you want your game running at. This makes it easy to do something like 60 FPS without whipping out your calculator first. Simple division, that's all.

End result:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int FPS = 50 //Framerate
    //Setup stuff
    while(GAME_RUNNING)
    {
        Uint32 start_time = SDL_GetTicks();

        //Event handling

        //Logic stuff

        //Rendering things

        if((1000/FPS)>(SDL_GetTicks()-start_time))
        {
            SDL_Delay((1000/FPS)-(SDL_GetTicks()-start_time)) //Yay stable framerate!
        }
    }

This is pretty much the easiest way to control your game rendering. On a side note, I use a little more complicated method where I create a separate thread for screen rendering at 60Hz while I run the game loop at 100. No wasted processing power and I can have a nice, round number for my in-game calculations. Look up the SDL_CreateThread() function, it makes it extremely simple for this.

The only problem you might run into would be rendering a dynamic number of objects to the screen, however all that can be solved with static vectors, but I digress. I hope this solved most of your problems, but since this post is 3 months old, it may just be more useful for anyone else stumbling upon it asking the same questions.

5
  • 1
    Thank you very much for your time! I appreciate this very much. I'm new to SDL and Opengl so i keep stumbling upon various problems...all that i can say is to thank you. I really learned how to maintain the framerate (if i'm right) in my game, but there is a little problem. The very basic thing is that this game is working so smoothly with very high speeds on other computers. For example my cousin runs it way faster and the same code on my computer is running very slow. I have updated my video card and all and it still won't work. Same code, different results.
    – user2128436
    Jun 26, 2013 at 18:37
  • Is it still very slow even with the framerate optimization? What does your game loop look like after adjusting it as my post suggests? Jun 28, 2013 at 6:31
  • Well. What do you mean how it looks? Oh, and as an update, i've searched the net to find a solution to this problem and i've found it. It seems to be a problem with the VSYNC ( SDL_GL_SetAttribute(SDL_GL_SWAP_CONTROL, 0) to disable it), and now the game runs way too fast, and with your help with the framerate now it runs very smooth. Thank you a lot! Oh and by the way, do you know why this was necessary? Thank you again sir!
    – user2128436
    Jun 28, 2013 at 7:02
  • Ha! Yes, V-Sync can be very intensive, actually. V-Sync is short for Vertical Synchronization and keeps your game's buffer from rendering two different frames at the same time. This is known as screen tearing. V-sync is awful, however, and can create optimization bottlenecks like what you were experiencing and screen judder. Screen tearing used to be a problem on older systems, but now v-sync is just kept for legacy purposes pretty much. I've never once used it in any of my projects. Jul 8, 2013 at 18:42
  • Assuming the value of FPS is not going to change throughout the game, you could optimize this code further by pre-calculating (1000/FPS) e.g. #define VIDEO_FREQ_TICKS (1000 / 50). Feb 16, 2020 at 17:07
1

I have compiled your code on my PC, and is working smoothly (>500 fps) on an integrated graphics card (intel HD 4000).

If you want to check if openGL is running, use flags on your surface.

SDL_Surface* screen = SDL_SetVideoMode( 640, 480, 16, SDL_OPENGL );

if( screen->flags & SDL_OPENGL ) printf("using openGL");
0
1

Looking at the other answers, I'd guess that your machine does not have the h/w accelerated OpenGL driver, which is causing your game to pick up the MESA gl library.

Here's one way to confirm it. From a cmdline, type:

ldd ./program_name

If you see /usr/lib/mesa/libGL.so.1 rather than /usr/lib/libGL.so.1, you'll know why it's so slow.

4
  • How do you check on windows?
    – user1944441
    Mar 3, 2013 at 12:24
  • Thank you very much for your effort guys, but i can't seem to use the ldd command on Windows. I've updated my graphics card and it runs just the same, i can't find how to tell if my Opengl is h/w accelerated or not, and if not, what i could do to repair this. There are some other machines that the game is running very slow, and other that moves fast. Thank you again!
    – user2128436
    Mar 3, 2013 at 17:35
  • Sorry to bother you again, but i still can't find a way to make the game go faster, i think the thing is it's not going hardware rendering and it's going slow. Or maybe the code is not the problem because i did the same thing on a different computer and it runs way faster. I just can't seem to find the way to make it go faster on my computer. I don't think my computers' performance is a problem. Thanks in advance
    – user2128436
    Jun 2, 2013 at 11:29
  • If you have an NVIDIA gpu, then make sure you download their driver from their webpage (link). That should definitely give you their hardware-accelerated OpenGL driver. Jun 2, 2013 at 19:55

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