35

I'm having a hard time understanding why

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int fib(int x) {
    if (x == 1) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return fib(x-1)+fib(x-2);
    }
}

int main() {
    cout << fib(5) << endl;
}

results in a segmentation fault. Once x gets down to 1 shouldn't it eventually return?

  • 14
    The time complexity of this algorithm is O(2^n). It is very bad. For exapmle, f(30) calculation required about 1 billion operations. Use the dynamic programming in your case. – Alexey Malistov Oct 5 '09 at 8:07
  • 5
    @Alexey, I'm sure the OP just wants to learn. If performance is an issue, Meta-programming is really the way to go. – LiraNuna Oct 5 '09 at 8:11
  • 2
    @Alexey Malistov: No, use the iterative approach instead. – Gumbo Oct 5 '09 at 8:13
  • 11
    @Gumbo: No, use the force Luke! – Spoike Oct 5 '09 at 10:17
  • 20
    I like to joke (or not) that the time complexity of this algorithm is O(fib(n)). – R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 5 '09 at 13:04

13 Answers 13

150

When x==2 you call fib(1) and fib(0):

return fib(2-1)+fib(2-2);

Consider what will happen when fib(0) is evaluated...

  • 72
    +1 for not giving the answer directly but indicating where the problem is. Much better for someone who is learning. – Xetius Oct 5 '09 at 8:41
  • 4
    +1, I use the same technique with my oldest kid (9) and it stimulates his ability to solve problems. – Toon Krijthe Oct 5 '09 at 11:52
40

The reason is because Fibonacci sequence starts with two known entities, 0 and 1. Your code only checks for one of them (being one).

Change your code to

int fib(int x) {
    if (x == 0)
        return 0;

    if (x == 1)
        return 1;

    return fib(x-1)+fib(x-2);
}

To include both 0 and 1.

  • 3
    Does not the series starts from 1,1? – vpram86 Oct 5 '09 at 8:58
  • 1
    That's not what I've been taught, and not what Wikipedia suggests - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number – LiraNuna Oct 5 '09 at 9:28
  • 2
    @Aviator: Depends on how you define Fibonacci numbers. ;) – Spoike Oct 5 '09 at 9:34
  • 1
    @Spoike, @LiraNuna: Thanks :) Got it now. Have seen some implementations starting with 1,1,2 etc.,. So got confused! – vpram86 Oct 5 '09 at 11:07
  • 6
    Or about changing both lines to if (x <= 1) return x. :-) – ghostmansd Jan 24 '13 at 22:20
11

Why not use iterative algorithm?

int fib(int n)
{
    int a = 1, b = 1;
    for (int i = 3; i <= n; i++) {
        int c = a + b;
        a = b;
        b = c;
    }           
    return b;
}
  • 3
    That’s the best approach. But he asked for a recursive solution. – Gumbo Oct 5 '09 at 8:15
  • @Gumbo, the 'best' approach would be meta-programming, no doubt. – LiraNuna Oct 5 '09 at 8:16
  • @LiraNuna: That’s not meta-programming. – Gumbo Oct 5 '09 at 8:18
  • 13
    A metaprogramming approach would basically boil down to a recursive solution...the calculation would simply be transfered from runtime to compile-time. Claiming that this would be a better approach is non-sense because we don't know the OP requirements: if he just needs to run the program once, having a huge compile time and a short runtime is not better than having a short compile time and a long runtime. Similarly, if he needs to take as input the 'n' parameter, metaprogramming is not usable (except if you explicitely put an upper bound to this number). Moreover, compilers have a limited... – Luc Touraille Oct 5 '09 at 9:51
  • 6
    ...recursion depth, so this can be an issue. To sum up, metaprogramming is a really powerful tool, but should be wisely used, only when it truly fits the problem. – Luc Touraille Oct 5 '09 at 9:54
7

By definition, the first two numbers in the Fibonacci sequence are 1 and 1, or 0 and 1. Therefore, you should handle it.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int Fibonacci(int);

int main(void) {
    int number;

    cout << "Please enter a positive integer: ";
    cin >> number;
    if (number < 0)
        cout << "That is not a positive integer.\n";
    else
        cout << number << " Fibonacci is: " << Fibonacci(number) << endl;
}

int Fibonacci(int x) 
{
    if (x < 2){
     return x;
    }     
    return (Fibonacci (x - 1) + Fibonacci (x - 2));
}
3

I think this solution is short and seem looks nice:

long long fib(int n){
  return n<=2?1:fib(n-1)+fib(n-2);
}

Edit : as jweyrich mentioned, true recursive function should be:

long long fib(int n){
      return n<2?n:fib(n-1)+fib(n-2);
    }

(because fib(0) = 0. but base on above recursive formula, fib(0) will be 1)

To understand recursion algorithm, you should draw to your paper, and the most important thing is : "Think normal as often".

  • 1
    fib(0) wrongly results in 1. This would solve: return x < 2 ? x : fibonnaci(x-1) + fibonnaci(x-2);. Here an extra condition exclusively for fib(2) would just slow down the function. – jweyrich Oct 28 '13 at 17:53
  • often fibonnaci function n just runs up to about 50 with recursive call. I don't think additional condition will slow down the recursive call – hqt Oct 28 '13 at 18:04
  • 1
    My point was that your fib function returns the wrong result for fib(0). Please, ignore the rest :-) – jweyrich Oct 28 '13 at 18:13
  • @jweyrich I have edited my post :D thanks for comment :D – hqt Oct 28 '13 at 18:32
3

This is my solution to fibonacci problem with recursion.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int fibonacci(int n){
    if(n<=0)
        return 0;
    else if(n==1 || n==2)
        return 1;
    else
        return (fibonacci(n-1)+fibonacci(n-2));
}

int main() {
    cout << fibonacci(8);
    return 0;
}
2
int fib(int n) {
    if (n == 1 || n == 2) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2);
    }
}

in fibonacci sequence first 2 numbers always sequels to 1 then every time the value became 1 or 2 it must return 1

1
int fib(int x) 
{
    if (x == 0)
      return 0;
    else if (x == 1 || x == 2) 
      return 1;
    else 
      return (fib(x - 1) + fib(x - 2));
}
  • Do have an answer on the question (see why below) too? – Trinimon Apr 29 '13 at 7:28
  • 2
    if (x < 3) return (int)((bool)x); might work also – user2816674 May 19 '15 at 3:46
1
int fib(int x) 
{
    if (x < 2)
      return x;
    else 
      return (fib(x - 1) + fib(x - 2));
}
  • Perfect! I just remove the else. – Avelino Jul 2 '14 at 17:36
1
if(n==1 || n==0){
    return n;
}else{     
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

However, using recursion to get fibonacci number is bad practice, because function is called about 8.5 times than received number. E.g. to get fibonacci number of 30 (1346269) - function is called 7049122 times!

0

My solution is:

#include <iostream>


    int fib(int number);

    void call_fib(void);

    int main()
    {
    call_fib();
    return 0;
    }

    void call_fib(void)
    {
      int input;
      std::cout<<"enter a number\t";
      std::cin>> input;
      if (input <0)
      {
        input=0;
        std::cout<<"that is not a valid input\n"   ;
        call_fib();
     }
     else 
     {
         std::cout<<"the "<<input <<"th fibonacci number is "<<fib(input);
     }

    }





    int fib(int x)
    {
     if (x==0){return 0;}
     else if (x==2 || x==1)
    {
         return 1;   
    }

    else if (x>0)
   {
        return fib(x-1)+fib(x-2);
    }
    else 
     return -1;
    }

it returns fib(0)=0 and error if negitive

  • This doesn't really answer the question... – Persistence Nov 2 '16 at 21:38
0

I think it's the best solution of fibonacci using recursion.

#include<bits/stdc++.h>
typedef unsigned long long ull;
typedef long long ll;
ull FIBO[100005];
using namespace std;
ull fibo(ull n)
{
    if(n==1||n==0)
        return n;
    if(FIBO[n]!=0)
        return FIBO[n];
    FIBO[n] = (fibo(n-1)+fibo(n-2));
    return FIBO[n];
}
int main()
{
    for(long long  i =34;i<=60;i++)
        cout<<fibo(i)<<" " ;
    return 0;
}
0

I think that all that solutions are inefficient. They require a lot of recursive calls to get the result.

unsigned fib(unsigned n) {
    if(n == 0) return 0;
    if(n == 1) return 1;
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

This code requires 14 calls to get result for fib(5), 177 for fin(10) and 2.7kk for fib(30).

You should better use this approach or if you want to use recursion try this:

unsigned fib(unsigned n, unsigned prev1 = 0, unsigned prev2 = 1, int depth = 2)     
{
    if(n == 0) return 0;
    if(n == 1) return 1;
    if(depth < n) return fib(n, prev2, prev1+prev2, depth+1);
    return prev1+prev2;
}

This function requires n recursive calls to calculate Fibonacci number for n. You can still use it by calling fib(10) because all other parameters have default values.

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