12

This is probably a minor point, but I was wondering why Perl's logical operators (&&, ||, and !) take precedence over the easily understandable "English" logical operators (and, or and not). Is there any advantage of using the former set and any disadvantage of using the latter set in a script?

  • Because Larry Wall liked it that way? – mvp Mar 4 '13 at 1:51
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    If they were identical in preference, it would not be necessary to keep both versions - only one would be enough to keep. Since Larry is a linguist and liked to use plain English words across his new language, he introduced these (alongside with unless and others). And of course, he assigned meaning to these words that he liked better (and still different from C-style operators) – mvp Mar 4 '13 at 2:44
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If || and or had the same precedence, then

return some_func $test1 || $test2;

would mean

return some_func($test1) || $test2;

instead of

return some_func($test1 || $test2);

or

some_func $test1 or die;

would mean

some_func($test1 or die);

instead of

some_func($test1) or die;

Neither of those changes are desirable.

And while one could debate or is more easily understood than ||, it's harder to read. It's easier to read code when the operators don't look like their operands.

22

The original &&, || and ! operators are high precedence to match the C language.

The newer (but still old) and, or and not operators were added to simplify some common constructs. For example, compare:

open my $fh, '<', $filename || die "A horrible death!";
open my $fh, '<', $filename or die "A horrible death!";

The first of these is incorrect; the high priority || binds with $filename and die which is not what you want. The second is correct; the low priority or means that the missing parentheses do not lead to ambiguity.

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    +1 because this is the actual reason Larry Wall gives in Programming Perl. – Kyle Strand Mar 4 '13 at 3:01
-3

converting comment to an answer:

If these operators were identical in preference, it would not be necessary to keep both versions - having only one version would be enough.

But Larry Wall is a linguist, and he really liked to use plain English words across his new language. So, he introduced these English-style operators (alongside with unless and others).

To keep C-style operators and their classic meaning, he needed to make new keywords not redundant. Because of that he assigned slightly different meaning to these operators that he liked better. So that difference turned out to be operator precedence.

  • 1
    That isn't true: it is nothing to do with Larry's predilection for English words. and and or were included in addition to && and || purely to offer identical operators with a lower binding priority. They are particularly useful in Perl because function calls don't require parentheses around the parameters. – Borodin Mar 4 '13 at 3:04
  • Isn't that what I said? If they were identical in priority, and and or would not exist today. And English-style constructs certainly do offer more flexibility, I am not disputing that either – mvp Mar 4 '13 at 3:06
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    No it's not what you said. "[Larry Wall] really liked to use plain English words across his new language. So, he introduced these English-style operators...He needed to make new keywords not redundant [so] he assigned slightly different meaning to these operators that he liked better." is fairy tale nonsense. – Borodin Mar 4 '13 at 3:23
  • The only person who can tell this for certain is Larry Wall himself – mvp Mar 4 '13 at 3:27

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