190

I need to randomly shuffle the following Array:

int[] solutionArray = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1};

Is there any function to do that?

  • 3
    This is the SDK method you are looking for Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)); – Louis Hong Nov 5 '13 at 0:28
  • @Louie No, that doesn't work. That would create a List<int[]> containing one entry. See my answer for the way to achieve this using Collections.shuffle(). – Duncan Jones Jan 30 '14 at 10:52
  • 2
    Not really an answer to the original question, but MathArrays.shuffle from the commons-math3 library does the job. – sandris Oct 29 '14 at 9:24
  • 1
    This is not on-topic enough to warrant an answer, but I remember a really cool article from "Graphics Gems" book that talked about traversing an array in pseudo random order. In my mind that beats having to actually shuffle the data in the first place. The C-implementation is found here github.com/erich666/GraphicsGems/blob/master/gems/Dissolve.c – Lennart Rolland Nov 15 '15 at 21:35
  • Also see this closely related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2450954/… – Pierz Dec 2 '16 at 8:52

25 Answers 25

234

Using Collections to shuffle an array of primitive types is a bit of an overkill...

It is simple enough to implement the function yourself, using for example the Fisher–Yates shuffle:

import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadLocalRandom;

class Test
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    int[] solutionArray = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11 };

    shuffleArray(solutionArray);
    for (int i = 0; i < solutionArray.length; i++)
    {
      System.out.print(solutionArray[i] + " ");
    }
    System.out.println();
  }

  // Implementing Fisher–Yates shuffle
  static void shuffleArray(int[] ar)
  {
    // If running on Java 6 or older, use `new Random()` on RHS here
    Random rnd = ThreadLocalRandom.current();
    for (int i = ar.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
      int index = rnd.nextInt(i + 1);
      // Simple swap
      int a = ar[index];
      ar[index] = ar[i];
      ar[i] = a;
    }
  }
}
  • 25
    Extremely trivial nitpick, but you can just use println() instead of println(""). Clearer in intent I think :) – Cowan Sep 17 '10 at 2:09
  • 42
    It'd be much better to use Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)); then making a shuffle your self. – Louis Hong Nov 5 '13 at 0:12
  • 17
    @Louie Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)) doesn't work, because Arrays.asList(array) returns Collection<int[]> not Collection<Integer> as you thought. – Adam Stelmaszczyk Dec 13 '13 at 12:33
  • 14
    @exhuma Because if you have an array of thousands or millions of primitive values to sort, wrapping each one in an object just to do a sort is a bit costly, both in memory and in CPU. – PhiLho Jul 11 '14 at 11:11
  • 8
    This is not the Fisher-Yates shuffle. This is called Durstenfeld shuffle. The original fisher-yates shuffle runs in O(n^2) time which is extremely slow. – Pacerier Oct 31 '14 at 12:39
140

Here is a simple way using an ArrayList:

List<Integer> solution = new ArrayList<>();
for (int i = 1; i <= 6; i++) {
    solution.add(i);
}
Collections.shuffle(solution);
92

Here is a working and efficient Fisher–Yates shuffle array function:

private static void shuffleArray(int[] array)
{
    int index;
    Random random = new Random();
    for (int i = array.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        index = random.nextInt(i + 1);
        if (index != i)
        {
            array[index] ^= array[i];
            array[i] ^= array[index];
            array[index] ^= array[i];
        }
    }
}

or

private static void shuffleArray(int[] array)
{
    int index, temp;
    Random random = new Random();
    for (int i = array.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        index = random.nextInt(i + 1);
        temp = array[index];
        array[index] = array[i];
        array[i] = temp;
    }
}
  • 1
    Voted up because I needed a solution that did not have the high overhead of creating a Collection of Integer – mwk Sep 30 '13 at 17:27
  • 2
    Doesn't the second implementation have the potential to swap with its own index? random.nextInt(int bound) is exclusive but giving it i + 1 as an argument would allow index and i to potentially be the same. – bmcentee148 May 27 '15 at 2:42
  • 19
    @bmcentee148 Swapping an element with itself is permissible in a random ordering. Not understanding this weakened the Enigma and helped enable Alan Turing to crack it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Ellen Spertus Jun 9 '15 at 23:59
  • 4
    The xor trick is great for swapping CPU registers when the CPU has no swap instruction and there are no free registers, but for swapping array elements inside a loop, I don’t see any benefit. For the temporary local variables, there is no reason to declare them outside the loop. – Holger Jan 6 '17 at 18:46
  • 1
    It's slightly more efficient to declare the temp variable outside of the loop. The XOR trick should be faster than using a temp variable but the only way to be sure it to perform a benchmark test. – Dan Bray Jan 6 '17 at 20:08
22

Collections class has an efficient method for shuffling, that can be copied, so as not to depend on it:

/**
 * Usage:
 *    int[] array = {1, 2, 3};
 *    Util.shuffle(array);
 */
public class Util {

    private static Random random;

    /**
     * Code from method java.util.Collections.shuffle();
     */
    public static void shuffle(int[] array) {
        if (random == null) random = new Random();
        int count = array.length;
        for (int i = count; i > 1; i--) {
            swap(array, i - 1, random.nextInt(i));
        }
    }

    private static void swap(int[] array, int i, int j) {
        int temp = array[i];
        array[i] = array[j];
        array[j] = temp;
    }
}
  • so as not to depend on it? I'd much prefer to depend on it, if that were only possible. – shmosel Feb 23 '17 at 21:18
  • @shmosel Then feel free to use it. Make sure you import the required class and you have converted the array to a list with Arrays.asList. You have to convert the resulting list to an array, too – KitKat Jun 9 '18 at 16:50
  • You can't use Arrays.asList() on a primitive array. And you wouldn't need to convert it back because it's just a wrapper. – shmosel Jun 10 '18 at 4:12
12

Look at the Collections class, specifically shuffle(...).

  • 8
    How do you use this Collections class in Android ? You need to do a special import (CRTL SHIT O doesn't work) to use it ? – Hubert Oct 5 '09 at 12:23
  • 5
    @gla3dr It should be below the "ANY" key. – Madmenyo Dec 7 '14 at 15:45
  • @Hubert it should be part of the package java.util. It's part of the standard library since v1.2. – MauganRa Feb 2 '17 at 16:04
  • 2
    To make your answer more self contained, it should contain example code. IE: import java.util.Collections; shuffle(solutionArray); – Steven M. Vascellaro Apr 23 '17 at 17:49
9

Here is a complete solution using the Collections.shuffle approach:

public static void shuffleArray(int[] array) {
  List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();
  for (int i : array) {
    list.add(i);
  }

  Collections.shuffle(list);

  for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
    array[i] = list.get(i);
  }    
}

Note that it suffers due to Java's inability to smoothly translate between int[] and Integer[] (and thus int[] and List<Integer>).

9

You have a couple options here. A list is a bit different than an array when it comes to shuffling.

As you can see below, an array is faster than a list, and a primitive array is faster than an object array.

Sample Durations

List<Integer> Shuffle: 43133ns
    Integer[] Shuffle: 31884ns
        int[] Shuffle: 25377ns

Below, are three different implementations of a shuffle. You should only use Collections.shuffle if you are dealing with a collection. There is no need to wrap your array into a collection just to sort it. The methods below are very simple to implement.

ShuffleUtil Class

import java.lang.reflect.Array;
import java.util.*;

public class ShuffleUtil<T> {
    private static final int[] EMPTY_INT_ARRAY = new int[0];
    private static final int SHUFFLE_THRESHOLD = 5;

    private static Random rand;

Main Method

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Integer> list = null;
        Integer[] arr = null;
        int[] iarr = null;

        long start = 0;
        int cycles = 1000;
        int n = 1000;

        // Shuffle List<Integer>
        start = System.nanoTime();
        list = range(n);
        for (int i = 0; i < cycles; i++) {
            ShuffleUtil.shuffle(list);
        }
        System.out.printf("%22s: %dns%n", "List<Integer> Shuffle", (System.nanoTime() - start) / cycles);

        // Shuffle Integer[]
        start = System.nanoTime();
        arr = toArray(list);
        for (int i = 0; i < cycles; i++) {
            ShuffleUtil.shuffle(arr);
        }
        System.out.printf("%22s: %dns%n", "Integer[] Shuffle", (System.nanoTime() - start) / cycles);

        // Shuffle int[]
        start = System.nanoTime();
        iarr = toPrimitive(arr);
        for (int i = 0; i < cycles; i++) {
            ShuffleUtil.shuffle(iarr);
        }
        System.out.printf("%22s: %dns%n", "int[] Shuffle", (System.nanoTime() - start) / cycles);
    }

Shuffling a Generic List

    // ================================================================
    // Shuffle List<T> (java.lang.Collections)
    // ================================================================
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <T> void shuffle(List<T> list) {
        if (rand == null) {
            rand = new Random();
        }
        int size = list.size();
        if (size < SHUFFLE_THRESHOLD || list instanceof RandomAccess) {
            for (int i = size; i > 1; i--) {
                swap(list, i - 1, rand.nextInt(i));
            }
        } else {
            Object arr[] = list.toArray();

            for (int i = size; i > 1; i--) {
                swap(arr, i - 1, rand.nextInt(i));
            }

            ListIterator<T> it = list.listIterator();
            int i = 0;

            while (it.hasNext()) {
                it.next();
                it.set((T) arr[i++]);
            }
        }
    }

    public static <T> void swap(List<T> list, int i, int j) {
        final List<T> l = list;
        l.set(i, l.set(j, l.get(i)));
    }

    public static <T> List<T> shuffled(List<T> list) {
        List<T> copy = copyList(list);
        shuffle(copy);
        return copy;
    }

Shuffling a Generic Array

    // ================================================================
    // Shuffle T[]
    // ================================================================
    public static <T> void shuffle(T[] arr) {
        if (rand == null) {
            rand = new Random();
        }

        for (int i = arr.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
            swap(arr, i, rand.nextInt(i + 1));
        }
    }

    public static <T> void swap(T[] arr, int i, int j) {
        T tmp = arr[i];
        arr[i] = arr[j];
        arr[j] = tmp;
    }

    public static <T> T[] shuffled(T[] arr) {
        T[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(arr, arr.length);
        shuffle(copy);
        return copy;
    }

Shuffling a Primitive Array

    // ================================================================
    // Shuffle int[]
    // ================================================================
    public static <T> void shuffle(int[] arr) {
        if (rand == null) {
            rand = new Random();
        }

        for (int i = arr.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
            swap(arr, i, rand.nextInt(i + 1));
        }
    }

    public static <T> void swap(int[] arr, int i, int j) {
        int tmp = arr[i];
        arr[i] = arr[j];
        arr[j] = tmp;
    }

    public static int[] shuffled(int[] arr) {
        int[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(arr, arr.length);
        shuffle(copy);
        return copy;
    }

Utility Methods

Simple utility methods to copy and convert arrays to lists and vice-versa.

    // ================================================================
    // Utility methods
    // ================================================================
    protected static <T> List<T> copyList(List<T> list) {
        List<T> copy = new ArrayList<T>(list.size());
        for (T item : list) {
            copy.add(item);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    protected static int[] toPrimitive(Integer[] array) {
        if (array == null) {
            return null;
        } else if (array.length == 0) {
            return EMPTY_INT_ARRAY;
        }
        final int[] result = new int[array.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
            result[i] = array[i].intValue();
        }
        return result;
    }

    protected static Integer[] toArray(List<Integer> list) {
        return toArray(list, Integer.class);
    }

    protected static <T> T[] toArray(List<T> list, Class<T> clazz) {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        final T[] arr = list.toArray((T[]) Array.newInstance(clazz, list.size()));
        return arr;
    }

Range Class

Generates a range of values, similar to Python's range function.

    // ================================================================
    // Range class for generating a range of values.
    // ================================================================
    protected static List<Integer> range(int n) {
        return toList(new Range(n), new ArrayList<Integer>());
    }

    protected static <T> List<T> toList(Iterable<T> iterable) {
        return toList(iterable, new ArrayList<T>());
    }

    protected static <T> List<T> toList(Iterable<T> iterable, List<T> destination) {
        addAll(destination, iterable.iterator());

        return destination;
    }

    protected static <T> void addAll(Collection<T> collection, Iterator<T> iterator) {
        while (iterator.hasNext()) {
            collection.add(iterator.next());
        }
    }

    private static class Range implements Iterable<Integer> {
        private int start;
        private int stop;
        private int step;

        private Range(int n) {
            this(0, n, 1);
        }

        private Range(int start, int stop) {
            this(start, stop, 1);
        }

        private Range(int start, int stop, int step) {
            this.start = start;
            this.stop = stop;
            this.step = step;
        }

        @Override
        public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {
            final int min = start;
            final int max = stop / step;

            return new Iterator<Integer>() {
                private int current = min;

                @Override
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    return current < max;
                }

                @Override
                public Integer next() {
                    if (hasNext()) {
                        return current++ * step;
                    } else {
                        throw new NoSuchElementException("Range reached the end");
                    }
                }

                @Override
                public void remove() {
                    throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Can't remove values from a Range");
                }
            };
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    You are not timing the same things and you're timing each one only once (then their order counts & you forget the runtime optimization). You should call range, toArray and toPrimitive before any timing, and loop to be able to conclude anything (pseudo-code: do several times { generate list, arr and iarr; time shuffling list; time shuffling arr; time shuffling iarr }). My results: 1st: list: 36017ns, arr: 28262ns, iarr: 23334ns. 100th: list: 18445ns, arr: 19995ns, iarr: 18657ns. It just shows int[] is pre-optimized (by code) but they're almost equivalent with runtime optimization. – syme Jul 3 '16 at 13:05
8

Using ArrayList<Integer> can help you solving the problem of shuffling without applying much of logic and consuming less time. Here is what I suggest:

ArrayList<Integer> x = new ArrayList<Integer>();
for(int i=1; i<=add.length(); i++)
{
    x.add(i);
}
Collections.shuffle(x);
  • Probably not the latter - consuming less time. In fact this is certainly slower than the primitive implementations above. – Boris the Spider Sep 22 '14 at 9:18
  • 1
    For someone copies the code, watch the "for cycle" i=1 maybe you need i=0 – Boris Karloff Mar 7 '15 at 15:36
6

The following code will achieve a random ordering on the array.

// Shuffle the elements in the array
Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array));

from: http://www.programcreek.com/2012/02/java-method-to-shuffle-an-int-array-with-random-order/

4

You can use java 8 now:

Collections.addAll(list, arr);
Collections.shuffle(list);
cardsList.toArray(arr);
  • 1
    There is nothing Java8-specific in this code. This works since Java2. Well, it would work, once you fix the inconsistency between first using list and suddenly referring to cardsList. But since you need to create the temporary list, which you have omitted, there is no benefit over the Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(arr)); approach shown several times here. Which also works since Java2. – Holger Jan 6 '17 at 18:52
3

Here is a Generics version for arrays:

import java.util.Random;

public class Shuffle<T> {

    private final Random rnd;

    public Shuffle() {
        rnd = new Random();
    }

    /**
     * Fisher–Yates shuffle.
     */
    public void shuffle(T[] ar) {
        for (int i = ar.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
            int index = rnd.nextInt(i + 1);
            T a = ar[index];
            ar[index] = ar[i];
            ar[i] = a;
        }
    }
}

Considering that ArrayList is basically just an array, it may be advisable to work with an ArrayList instead of the explicit array and use Collections.shuffle(). Performance tests however, do not show any significant difference between the above and Collections.sort():

Shuffe<Integer>.shuffle(...) performance: 576084 shuffles per second
Collections.shuffle(ArrayList<Integer>) performance: 629400 shuffles per second
MathArrays.shuffle(int[]) performance: 53062 shuffles per second

The Apache Commons implementation MathArrays.shuffle is limited to int[] and the performance penalty is likely due to the random number generator being used.

  • 1
    It looks like you can pass new JDKRandomGenerator() to MathArrays.shuffle. I wonder how that affects the performance? – Brandon Mintern Dec 16 '16 at 21:34
  • Actually... it looks like MathArrays#shuffle has an allocation in its core loop: int targetIdx = new UniformIntegerDistribution(rng, start, i).sample();. Bizarre. – Brandon Mintern Dec 16 '16 at 21:40
3
Random rnd = new Random();
for (int i = ar.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
{
  int index = rnd.nextInt(i + 1);
  // Simple swap
  int a = ar[index];
  ar[index] = ar[i];
  ar[i] = a;
}

By the way, I've noticed that this code returns a ar.length - 1 number of elements, so if your array has 5 elements, the new shuffled array will have 4 elements. This happens because the for loop says i>0. If you change to i>=0, you get all elements shuffled.

  • Just a heads up, you may want to move this to the comment section of your question, since it will probably get flagged if it's left as its own answer. – Jason D Nov 15 '14 at 15:38
  • 1
    This seems to answer the question, so I am unsure what you are talking about @JasonD – Sumurai8 Nov 15 '14 at 16:42
  • 1
    The code is correct, the comment is wrong. If you change i>0 to i>=0, you waste time by swapping element 0 with itself. – jcsahnwaldt Mar 20 '16 at 16:33
3

Here is a solution using Apache Commons Math 3.x (for int[] arrays only):

MathArrays.shuffle(array);

http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-math/javadocs/api-3.6.1/org/apache/commons/math3/util/MathArrays.html#shuffle(int[])

Alternatively, Apache Commons Lang 3.6 introduced new shuffle methods to the ArrayUtils class (for objects and any primitive type).

ArrayUtils.shuffle(array);

http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-release/org/apache/commons/lang3/ArrayUtils.html#shuffle-int:A-

3

I saw some miss information in some answers so i decided to add a new one.

Java collections Arrays.asList takes var-arg of type T (T ...). If you pass a primitive array (int array), asList method will infer and generate a List<int[]>, which is a one element list (the one element is the primitive array). if you shuffle this one element list, it won`t change any thing.

So, first you have to convert you primitive array to Wrapper object array. for this you can use ArrayUtils.toObject method from apache.commons.lang. then pass the generated array to a List and finaly shuffle that.

  int[] intArr = {1,2,3};
  List<Integer> integerList = Arrays.asList(ArrayUtils.toObject(array));
  Collections.shuffle(integerList);
  //now! elements in integerList are shuffled!
2
  1. Box from int[] to Integer[]
  2. Wrap an array into a list with the Arrays.asList method
  3. Shuffle with Collections.shuffle method

    int[] solutionArray = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };
    
    Integer[] boxed = Arrays.stream(solutionArray).boxed().toArray(Integer[]::new);
    Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(boxed));
    
    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(boxed));
    // [1, 5, 5, 4, 2, 6, 1, 3, 3, 4, 2, 6]
    
2

Here's another way to shuffle a list

public List<Integer> shuffleArray(List<Integer> a) {
List<Integer> b = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    while (a.size() != 0) {
        int arrayIndex = (int) (Math.random() * (a.size()));
        b.add(a.get(arrayIndex));
        a.remove(a.get(arrayIndex));
    }
    return b;
}

Pick a random number from the original list and save it in another list.Then remove the number from the original list.The size of the original list will keep decreasing by one until all elements are moved to the new list.

1

I'm weighing in on this very popular question because nobody has written a shuffle-copy version. Style is borrowed heavily from Arrays.java, because who isn't pillaging Java technology these days? Generic and int implementations included.

   /**
    * Shuffles elements from {@code original} into a newly created array.
    *
    * @param original the original array
    * @return the new, shuffled array
    * @throws NullPointerException if {@code original == null}
    */
   @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
   public static <T> T[] shuffledCopy(T[] original) {
      int originalLength = original.length; // For exception priority compatibility.
      Random random = new Random();
      T[] result = (T[]) Array.newInstance(original.getClass().getComponentType(), originalLength);

      for (int i = 0; i < originalLength; i++) {
         int j = random.nextInt(i+1);
         result[i] = result[j];
         result[j] = original[i];
      }

      return result;
   }


   /**
    * Shuffles elements from {@code original} into a newly created array.
    *
    * @param original the original array
    * @return the new, shuffled array
    * @throws NullPointerException if {@code original == null}
    */
   public static int[] shuffledCopy(int[] original) {
      int originalLength = original.length;
      Random random = new Random();
      int[] result = new int[originalLength];

      for (int i = 0; i < originalLength; i++) {
         int j = random.nextInt(i+1);
         result[i] = result[j];
         result[j] = original[i];
      }

      return result;
   }
1

This is knuth shuffle algorithm.

public class Knuth { 

    // this class should not be instantiated
    private Knuth() { }

    /**
     * Rearranges an array of objects in uniformly random order
     * (under the assumption that <tt>Math.random()</tt> generates independent
     * and uniformly distributed numbers between 0 and 1).
     * @param a the array to be shuffled
     */
    public static void shuffle(Object[] a) {
        int n = a.length;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            // choose index uniformly in [i, n-1]
            int r = i + (int) (Math.random() * (n - i));
            Object swap = a[r];
            a[r] = a[i];
            a[i] = swap;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Reads in a sequence of strings from standard input, shuffles
     * them, and prints out the results.
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // read in the data
        String[] a = StdIn.readAllStrings();

        // shuffle the array
        Knuth.shuffle(a);

        // print results.
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
            StdOut.println(a[i]);
    }
}
1

There is another way also, not post yet

//that way, send many object types diferentes
public anotherWayToReciveParameter(Object... objects)
{
    //ready with array
    final int length =objects.length;
    System.out.println(length);
    //for ready same list
    Arrays.asList(objects);
}

that way more easy, depended of the context

1

The most simple solution for this Random Shuffling in an Array.

String location[] = {"delhi","banglore","mathura","lucknow","chandigarh","mumbai"};
int index;
String temp;
Random random = new Random();
for(int i=1;i<location.length;i++)
{
    index = random.nextInt(i+1);
    temp = location[index];
    location[index] = location[i];
    location[i] = temp;
    System.out.println("Location Based On Random Values :"+location[i]);
}
1

A simple solution for Groovy:

solutionArray.sort{ new Random().nextInt() }

This will sort all elements of the array list randomly which archives the desired result of shuffling all elements.

1

Simplest code to shuffle:

import java.util.*;
public class ch {
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner sc=new Scanner(System.in);
        ArrayList<Integer> l=new ArrayList<Integer>(10);
        for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
            l.add(sc.nextInt());
        Collections.shuffle(l);
        for(int j=0;j<10;j++)
            System.out.println(l.get(j));       
    }
}
0
public class ShuffleArray {
public static void shuffleArray(int[] a) {
    int n = a.length;
    Random random = new Random();
    random.nextInt();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int change = i + random.nextInt(n - i);
        swap(a, i, change);
    }
}

private static void swap(int[] a, int i, int change) {
    int helper = a[i];
    a[i] = a[change];
    a[change] = helper;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] a = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 };
    shuffleArray(a);
    for (int i : a) {
        System.out.println(i);
    }
}
}
  • Please add some related description regarding your answer. – ankit suthar Sep 26 '17 at 12:57
0
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Random;
public class shuffle {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int a[] =  {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
         ArrayList b = new ArrayList();
       int i=0,q=0;
       Random rand = new Random();

       while(a.length!=b.size())
       {
           int l = rand.nextInt(a.length);
//this is one option to that but has a flaw on 0
//           if(a[l] !=0)
//           {
//                b.add(a[l]);
//               a[l]=0;
//               
//           }
//           
// this works for every no. 
                if(!(b.contains(a[l])))
                {
                    b.add(a[l]);
                }



       }

//        for (int j = 0; j <b.size(); j++) {
//            System.out.println(b.get(j));
//            
//        }
System.out.println(b);
    }

}
-1

Another easy way to shuffle:

int LengthArray = solutionArray.lenght();
Random r = new Random();
int randomNumber = r.nextInt(LengthArray);
Integer Chosen = solutionArray.getInteger(randomNumber);

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