32
// template specialization
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

// class template:
template <class T>
class mycontainer {
    T element;
  public:
    mycontainer (T arg) {element=arg;}
    T increase () {

    //if(T.type==int)//how to do this or something similar?
    //do this if an int
    return ++element;

    //if(T.type==char)
     //if ((element>='a')&&(element<='z'))
      //element+='A'-'a';
      //return element;

    }
};

I know how to write a template specialization and do a separate whole class def just for the char type.

But what if I wanted to handle everything in just one block of code?

How can I check if T is an int or a char?

29

You could use typeid:

if (typeid(T) == typeid(int))

Or you could use the std::is_same type trait:

if (std::is_same<T, int>::value)
  • 1
    If only there was a static_if... maybe this will resolve to the same thing – David Mar 4 '13 at 11:03
  • 2
    There have been many proposals for a static_if but all have had problems. SG8 wrote an analysis of the proposals recently. – Joseph Mansfield Mar 4 '13 at 11:09
  • 4
    @JosephMansfield The link you provided has no preview. – kevin Jul 5 '16 at 2:45
  • 3
    C++17 introduces constexpr if, which is probably what you want here. – Léo Lam Aug 21 '17 at 20:27
13

What you want is probably something like a compile-time if. Unfortunately, C++11 has no native support for such a language construct.

However, if you just want to check whether two types are identical, the std::is_same<> type trait should help you:

#include <type_traits> // <== INCLUDE THIS STANDARD HEADER

// class template:
template <class T>
class mycontainer 
{
    T element;
public:
    mycontainer (T arg) {element=arg;}
    T increase () 
    {
        if (std::is_same<T, int>::value)   // <== THIS IS HOW YOU WOULD USE IT
            return ++element;

        if (std::is_same<T, char>::value)  // <== THIS IS HOW YOU WOULD USE IT
        {
            if ((element>='a') && (element<='z'))
                element+='A'-'a';
        }

        return element;
    }
};

However, keep in mind that the condition is evaluated at run-time, even though the value of is_same<T, int>::value is known at compile-time. This means that both the true and the false branch of the if statement must compile!

For instance, the following would not be legal:

if (std::is_same<T, int>::value)
{
    cout << element;
}
else if (std::is_same<T, my_class>::value)
{
    element->print();  // Would not compile when T is int!
}

Also, as Xeo correctly pointed out in the comments, the compiler will likely issue warnings because your condition will always evaluate to true or to false, so one of the two branches will contain unreachable code.

  • C++ does have compile-time if: it's called function overload resolution. – James Kanze Mar 4 '13 at 11:00
  • And this also means that you get warnings for the branches which are unused. The better form of this would be tag-dispatching, and I thought of that for my answer, but simple overloading does the job too. – Xeo Mar 4 '13 at 11:00
  • @JamesKanze: That's nothing like a true static if construct. – Andy Prowl Mar 4 '13 at 11:01
  • You might be able to do it with simple overload resolution, but it doesn't scale easily (e.g. if he wanted to do one thing for integral types, something else for all other types). – James Kanze Mar 4 '13 at 11:02
  • @AndyProwl It achieves the same ends. – James Kanze Mar 4 '13 at 11:02
7

How about a simple overload?

// in the private section
static int& do_increase(int& i){ return ++i; }
static char& do_increase(char& c){
  if(c >= 'a' && c <= 'z')
    c += 'A' - 'a';
  return c;
}
template<class U>
static U& do_increase(U& arg){
  // some default implementation?
  return arg;
}

(Note that the standard doesn't guarantee alphabetic order for the numeric values of a char.)

Then simply call that in increase as return do_increase(element);.

7

You may use explicit template specialization

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

// class template:
template <class T>
class mycontainer {
    T element;
  public:
    mycontainer (T arg) {element=arg;}
    T increase();
};


template<>
int mycontainer<int>::increase(){
    return ++element;
}

template<>
char mycontainer<char>::increase(){
    if ((element>='a')&&(element<='z'))
       element+='A'-'a';
    return element;
}

int main(){
        mycontainer<int> A(10);
        mycontainer<char> B('x');

        cout << A.increase() <<endl;
        cout << B.increase() <<endl;
        return 0;
}
  • 2
    I like this solution – Dmitri Apr 27 '17 at 21:04
  • Elegant solution which doesn't depend on any member function argument. I needed to cast *userp to T template type inside the member function such as static size_t WriteCallback(void *response, size_t size, size_t nmemb, void *userp) with strict non-modifiable signature. – Petr Javorik Jun 22 '18 at 18:18
3

The usual solution here is to forward to an overloaded function with an additional argument. Something like:

template <typename T>
class MyContainer
{
    T increase( int const* ) { /* special treatment for int */ }
    T increase( ... )        { /* default treatment         */ }
public:
    T increase()
    {
        return increase( (T const*)0 );
    }
};

With a little imagination, you can come up with all sorts of distinctions. If you make the target functions with the extra arguments templates, you can even leverage off SFINAE: design the dummy argument so that template type substitution fails, and the function will not be considered in the overload set. And since all of the functions are inline, it's probable that there will be no extra overhead, provided that you optimize.

  • The internal increase call doesn't need the template argument (in fact, it would be an error). – Xeo Mar 4 '13 at 11:02
  • @Xeo Correct. I'd orginally done something more generic, which required that the two target functions be templates (for SFINAE to come into play). I'll fix it here. – James Kanze Mar 4 '13 at 11:10
0

This is along the lines of Andy Prowls answer but is all done at compile-time using a minimal helper class with specialization.

In this instance you have a helper that actually does the specialization but you could also have the helper class just take a bool and then use something like std::is_same<T, int>::value to pass that value as a template parameter.

template <typename T>
struct myContainerHelper;
{
    // General Case
    static inline T increase(T element)
    {
        return ++element;
    }
};

template <>
struct myContainerHelper<char>
{
    // Specific case
    static inline char increase(char element)
    {
        if ((element>='a')&&(element<='z')) element+='A'-'a';
        return element;
    }
};

template <class T>
class mycontainer 
{
    T element;
public:
    mycontainer (T arg) {element=arg;}
    T increase () 
    {
        return myContainerHelper<T>::increase(element);
    }
};

This allows you to only specialize the single function instead of the entire class. I'm using a template class with statics because I'm used to VS2012 limitations with partial specialization for function templates.

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