34

In my Spring xml configuration I'm trying to get something like this to work:

<beans>

   <import resource="${file.to.import}" />

   <!-- Other bean definitions -->

</beans>

I want to decide which file to import based on a property in a properties file. I know that I can use a System property, but I can't add a property to the JVM at startup.

Note: The PropertyPlaceHolderConfigurer will not work. Imports are resolved before any BeanFactoryPostProcessors are run. The import element can only resolve System.properties.

Does anyone have a simple solution to this? I don't want to start subclassing framework classes and so on...

Thanks

3
  • 3
    Did you ever solve this? I have the exact same issue...
    – Dave
    Nov 24, 2010 at 3:13
  • I have opposite issue. Import resource works but value = ${something} doesn't work
    – Anshul
    Feb 24, 2015 at 10:45
  • 1
    You can do this using annotations as well @PropertySource("classpath:my-file.properties")
    – ug_
    Feb 24, 2017 at 7:42

10 Answers 10

15

This is, unfortunately, a lot harder than it should be. In my application I accomplished this by doing the following:

  1. A small, "bootstrap" context that is responsible for loading a PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer bean and another bean that is responsible for bootstrapping the application context.

  2. The 2nd bean mentioned above takes as input the "real" spring context files to load. I have my spring context files organized so that the configurable part is well known and in the same place. For example, I might have 3 config files: one.onpremise.xml, one.hosted.xml, one.multitenant.xml. The bean programmatically loads these context files into the current application context.

This works because the context files are specified as input the the bean responsible for loading them. It won't work if you just try to do an import, as you mentioned, but this has the same effect with slightly more work. The bootstrap class looks something like this:

 public class Bootstrapper implements ApplicationContextAware, InitializingBean {

    private WebApplicationContext context;
    private String[] configLocations;
    private String[] testConfigLocations;
    private boolean loadTestConfigurations;

    public void setConfigLocations(final String[] configLocations) {
        this.configLocations = configLocations;
    }

    public void setTestConfigLocations(final String[] testConfigLocations) {
        this.testConfigLocations = testConfigLocations;
    }

    public void setLoadTestConfigurations(final boolean loadTestConfigurations) {
        this.loadTestConfigurations = loadTestConfigurations;
    }

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(final ApplicationContext applicationContext) throws BeansException {
        context = (WebApplicationContext) applicationContext;
    }

    @Override
    public void afterPropertiesSet() throws Exception {
        String[] configsToLoad = configLocations;

        if (loadTestConfigurations) {
            configsToLoad = new String[configLocations.length + testConfigLocations.length];
            arraycopy(configLocations, 0, configsToLoad, 0, configLocations.length);
            arraycopy(testConfigLocations, 0, configsToLoad, configLocations.length, testConfigLocations.length);
        }

        context.setConfigLocations(configsToLoad);
        context.refresh();
    }
}

Basically, get the application context, set its config locations, and tell it to refresh itself. This works perfectly in my application.

Hope this helps.

6
  • Note: This code was taken from a working system, but I scrubbed it manually of some small bits and pieces related to the system itself. Apologize if there are any errors. Oct 6, 2009 at 18:08
  • Thanks, but unfortunately I don't have complete control of the startup as an EJB is the entrypoint to the application. Maybe I should just upgrade to Spring 3 and use the JavaConfig instead :)
    – nash2000
    Oct 7, 2009 at 6:37
  • I don't think you need any control other than being able to tell the EJB which spring context to load. Am I missing something? Oct 7, 2009 at 19:10
  • 3
    I'm surprised this solution wasn't accepted. It's simple and brilliant Feb 5, 2011 at 13:00
  • 1
    I would agree with Sean. @Louis smart stuff indeed.
    – Nilesh
    Mar 3, 2012 at 14:12
6

For the Spring 2.5 and 3.0, I have a similar solution to louis, however I've just read about 3.1's upcoming feature: property management, which sounds great too.

2
  • +1 for link to Spring 3.1 property management - nice new feature! Jun 12, 2012 at 17:08
  • 1
    Does somebody have a working example of that ? Couldn't make it work with 3.1.1. Jul 4, 2012 at 11:49
5

There is an old issue on the Spring JIRA for adding properties placeholder support for import (SPR-1358) that was resolved as "Won't Fix", but there has since been a proposed solution using an EagerPropertyPlaceholderConfigurer.

I've been lobbying to have SPR-1358 reopened, but no response so far. Perhaps if others added their use cases to the issue comments that would help raise awareness.

2

Why not:

  1. read your properties file on startup
  2. that will determine which Spring config to load
  3. whichever Spring config is loaded sets specific stuff, then loads a common Spring config

so you're effectively inverting your current proposed solution.

1
  • The entrypoint to the application is an EJB which loads the ApplicationContext on the first method call, so I can't really do what you're suggesting.
    – nash2000
    Oct 5, 2009 at 13:54
1

Add something similar to the following:

<bean id="propertyConfigurer" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
    <property name="ignoreResourceNotFound"><value>true</value></property>
    <property name="locations">
        <list>
            <value>classpath:propertyfile.properties</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
2
  • 4
    Thanks, but the PropertyPlaceHolderConfigurer will not work :)
    – nash2000
    Oct 6, 2009 at 6:38
  • Bummer. I see the note you added about the ordering of post processors and imports.
    – laz
    Oct 6, 2009 at 17:28
1

If what you want is to specify the imported XML file name outside applicationContext.xml so that you could replace applicationContext.xml without losing the configuration of the imported XML file path, you can just add an intermediate Spring beans XML file, say, confSelector.xml, so that applicationContext.xml imports confSelector.xml and confSelector.xml only contains an <import> element that refers to the suitable custom beans XML file.

Another means that might be of use are XML entities (defined by adding <!ENTITY ... > elements into the DTD declaration at the beginning of XML). These allow importing XML fragments from other files and provide "property placeholder"-like functionality for any XML file.

Neither of these solutions allows you to have the configuration file in Java's .properties format, though.

0

André Schuster's answer, which I bumped, helped me solve a very similar issue I was having in wanting to find a different expression of properties depending on whether I was running on my own host, by Jenkins on our build host or in "real" deployment. I did this:

<context:property-placeholder location="file:///etc/myplace/database.properties" />

followed later by

<bean id="propertyConfigurer"
      class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
    <property name="locations">
        <list>
            <value>WEB-INF/classes/resources/database.properties</value>
            ...
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>

which solved my problem because on my development host, I put a link to my own copy of database.properties in /etc/myplace/database.properties, and a slightly different one on the server running Jenkins. In real deployment, no such file is found, so Spring falls back on the "real" one in resources in my class files subdirectory. If the properties in question have already been specified by the file on /etc/myplace/database.properties, then (fortunately) they aren't redefined by the local file.

0

Another workaround which does not rely on system properties is to load the properties of all the files using a different PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer for each file and define a different placeholderPrefix for each of them. That placeholderprefix being configured by the initial property file.



Define the first property file: (containing either first or second)

global.properties

fileToUse=first


Define the files containing a property that can be switched depending on the property defined just above:

first.properties

aProperty=propertyContentOfFirst

second.properties

aProperty=propertyContentOfSecond


Then define the place holders for all the files:

<bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
    <property name="locations">
        <list>
            <value>classpath:global.properties</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
<bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
    <property name="placeholderPrefix" value="first{" />
    <property name="locations">
        <list>
            <value>classpath:first.properties</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>
<bean class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
    <property name="placeholderPrefix" value="second{" />
    <property name="locations">
        <list>
            <value>classpath:second.properties</value>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>


Use the property defined in global to identify the resource to use from the other file:

${fileToUse}{aProperty}
0

If I add the JVM argument below and have the file myApplicationContext.dev.xml, spring does load

-DmyEnvironment=dev

<context:property-placeholder />

<import resource="classpath:/resources/spring/myApplicationContext.${myEnvironment}.xml"/>
-2

I'm using Spring 3 and load a properties like that:

<context:property-placeholder location="/WEB-INF/my.properties" />
2
  • But that has nothing to do with the question. The <import> tag does not work with property placeholders. Feb 5, 2011 at 12:55
  • I would agree with Sean. property placeholder is a beanfactorypostprocessor.
    – Nilesh
    Mar 3, 2012 at 14:10

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