471

I am looking for a CSS selector for the following table:

Peter    | male    | 34
Susanne  | female  | 12

Is there any selector to match all TDs containing "male"?

  • 1
    The problem is that this would be very hard to implement in a performant way. – Ms2ger Oct 6 '09 at 13:11
  • 7
    An XPath selector can do it with the .text() method (if you prefer not to use JavaScript executor). – djangofan Feb 3 '13 at 20:46
  • 9
    Here's an exemple of how you can do it using xpath : //h1[text()='Session'] and you can test xpath in Chrome by typing $x("//h1[text()='Session']") in the console – VinnyG Jun 11 '13 at 17:53
  • 1
    This would be so convenient. For example, a table cell containing a checkmark or the string "Yes", "Pass", "OK" etc. could be green. – Andreas Rejbrand Dec 13 '14 at 0:34
  • the $x answers the question. for the original question, $x("//td[text()='male']") does the trick – Jeff Xiao Jan 6 '17 at 19:15

17 Answers 17

362

If I read the specification correctly, no.

You can match on an element, the name of an attribute in the element, and the value of a named attribute in an element. I don't see anything for matching content within an element, though.

152

Using jQuery:

$('td:contains("male")')
  • 6
    Ended up needing the opposite of this, which is: jQuery(element).not(":contains('string')") – Jazzy Nov 6 '13 at 22:58
  • 267
    Except that is not CSS, that is JavaScript. – Synetech Jul 6 '15 at 22:00
  • 8
    Agreed - that's why my answer said I was using jQuery, not CSS. But that part of my answer was edited out. =) – moettinger Jul 7 '15 at 1:22
  • 17
    but the word female itself also contains the word 'male' no? is it working just 'cos male is first? Bug waiting to happen if they are re-ordered? – Michael Durrant Mar 26 '16 at 22:56
  • 5
    @Michael Durrant: You jest, but cross-element string matching (which is an even bigger problem than regular substring matches within the same element) is in fact one of the biggest reasons :contains() was dropped. – BoltClock Jun 17 '16 at 5:19
146

Looks like they were thinking about it for the CSS3 spec but it didn't make the cut.

:contains() CSS3 selector http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-selectors/#content-selectors

  • 8
    Looks like they were thinking about it for the CSS3 spec but it didn't make the cut. And for good reason, it would violate the whole premise of separating styling, content, structure, and behavior. – Synetech Jul 6 '15 at 22:01
  • 47
    @Synetech It can actually help the separation of styling from content, as it means that the content doesn't need to know about its client is going to consider as important to base styling on. Right now our html content typically is tightly paired to the css by including classes that we know the styler cares about. They are already shifting towards letting CSS at the content, as evidenced by attribute value selectors in CSS3. – DannyMeister Jul 16 '15 at 23:23
  • 6
    @Synetech and how is it "behaviour", exactly? To me it is a matter of presentation. It doesn't do anything – it presents certain types of content in a certain way. – BarbaraKwarc Feb 28 '17 at 4:27
  • 3
    @DannyMeister, oh you don't have to convince me. A couple of years on and I find myself back here while trying to look for exactly this functionality, and upset that not only does it not exist, but it was rejected. 😒 eBay just changed their UI and made their site very hard to use. I'm trying to fix it with a user stylesheet, but their markup doesn't distinguish between auctions and BIN listings, so the only way to highlight the number of bids in a list is by matching the element by its textual content. All it takes to convince someone is for them to experience a use-case scenario first hand. – Synetech Jul 21 '18 at 10:48
  • 4
    To ensure a good separation of content and styling, we won't have a :contains() selector. So, instead of styling a cell based on its content (eg, a "status" column of "Open", or "Resolved"), we'll duplicate the content in both the display and the class attributes, and then select on that. Excellent! – Jon Kloske Jun 17 '19 at 6:31
113

You'd have to add a data attribute to the rows called data-gender with a male or female value and use the attribute selector:

HTML:

<td data-gender="male">...</td>

CSS:

td[data-gender="male"] { ... }
  • 10
    It's perfectly okay to use custom data attributes with Javascript and CSS. See MDN Using Data Attributes – Michael_B Oct 2 '15 at 0:00
  • 1
    I agree the data attribute is how it should be handled, BUT, a CSS rule like td.male is often much easier to set up, especially with angular which could look something like: <td class="{{person.gender}}"> – DJDaveMark Dec 4 '17 at 9:28
  • Gender is of course a typical example where classes would work. But what if the data is more varied than just male or female? The fact that class is filled with other classes, order of them is not guaranteed, there may be collissions with other class names etc makes class a worse place for this kind of stuff. A dedicated data-* attribute isolates your data from all that stuff and makes it easier to do partial matching etc on it using attribute selectors. – Stijn de Witt Dec 8 '18 at 14:17
  • There's another answer with a working code snippet which uses data attributes in a similar manner. – Josh Habdas Jan 9 '19 at 14:54
64

There is actually a very conceptual basis for why this hasn't been implemented. It is a combination of basically 3 aspects:

  1. The text content of an element is effectively a child of that element
  2. You cannot target the text content directly
  3. CSS does not allow for ascension with selectors

These 3 together mean that by the time you have the text content you cannot ascend back to the containing element, and you cannot style the present text. This is likely significant as descending only allows for a singular tracking of context and SAX style parsing. Ascending or other selectors involving other axes introduce the need for more complex traversal or similar solutions that would greatly complicate the application of CSS to the DOM.

  • 4
    This is true. This is what XPath is for. If you can execute the selector in JS/jQuery or a parsing library (as opposed to CSS-only), then it would be possible to use XPath's text() function. – Mark Thomas Jun 7 '13 at 13:25
27

You could set content as data attribute and then use attribute selectors, as shown here:

/* Select every cell containing word "male" */
td[data-content="male"] {
  color: red;
}

/* Select every cell starting on "p" case insensitive */
td[data-content^="p" i] {
  color: blue;
}

/* Select every cell containing "4" */
td[data-content*="4"] {
  color: green;
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <td data-content="Peter">Peter</td>
    <td data-content="male">male</td>
    <td data-content="34">34</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td data-conten="Susanne">Susanne</td>
    <td data-content="female">female</td>
    <td data-content="14">14</td>
  </tr>
</table>

You can also use jQuery to easily set the data-content attributes:

$(function(){
  $("td").each(function(){
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.attr("data-content", $this.text());
  });
});
  • 3
    note that .text() and .textContent are pretty heavy, try to avoid them in long lists or large texts when possible. .html() and .innerHTML are fast. – oriadam Jul 18 '17 at 14:09
  • @JoshHabdas can you make a jsbin/jsfiddle example of your change? – Buksy Jan 9 '19 at 7:18
  • 1
    If you are going to use jQuery, use the contains selector: $("td:contains(male)") – huwiler Sep 23 '19 at 20:04
11

As CSS lacks this feature you will have to use JavaScript to style cells by content. For example with XPath's contains:

var elms = document.evaluate( "//td[contains(., 'male')]", node, null, XPathResult.UNORDERED_NODE_SNAPSHOT_TYPE, null )

Then use the result like so:

for ( var i=0 ; i < elms.snapshotLength; i++ ){
   elms.snapshotItem(i).style.background = "pink";
}

https://jsfiddle.net/gaby_de_wilde/o7bka7Ls/9/

  • this is javascript, How is this related to the question? – rubo77 Aug 11 '16 at 1:27
  • 3
    As you cant select by content in css you will have to use js to do that. While you are right where you point out that this isn't css, the use of a data attribute isn't selecting by content. We can only guess why the reader wants to select cells by content, what kind of access she has to the html, how many matches, how big the table is etc. etc – user40521 Sep 7 '16 at 16:00
7

I'm afraid this is not possible, because the content is no attribute nor is it accessible via a pseudo class. The full list of CSS3 selectors can be found in the CSS3 specification.

4

For those who are looking to do Selenium CSS text selections, this script might be of some use.

The trick is to select the parent of the element that you are looking for, and then search for the child that has the text:

public static IWebElement FindByText(this IWebDriver driver, string text)
{
    var list = driver.FindElement(By.CssSelector("#RiskAddressList"));
    var element = ((IJavaScriptExecutor)driver).ExecuteScript(string.Format(" var x = $(arguments[0]).find(\":contains('{0}')\"); return x;", text), list);
    return ((System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<IWebElement>)element)[0];
}

This will return the first element if there is more than one since it's always one element, in my case.

  • You can use TD:contains('male') if you're using Selenium: imho only use it if you cannot update the source to add classes. e.g. if you are testing legacy code or your company wont let you speak to the devs (eurgh!) because your tests will be brittle and will break if someone changes the text later to masculine or changes language. SauceLabs docs shows use of contains here (saucelabs.com/resources/articles/selenium-tips-css-selectors) +cc @matas vaitkevicius have I missed something? – snowcode Nov 14 '19 at 9:10
3

I agree the data attribute (voyager's answer) is how it should be handled, BUT, CSS rules like:

td.male { color: blue; }
td.female { color: pink; }

can often be much easier to set up, especially with client-side libs like angularjs which could be as simple as:

<td class="{{person.gender}}">

Just make sure that the content is only one word! Or you could even map to different CSS class names with:

<td ng-class="{'masculine': person.isMale(), 'feminine': person.isFemale()}">

For completeness, here's the data attribute approach:

<td data-gender="{{person.gender}}">
  • Template bindings are a great solution. But it feels a bit ick to create classnames based on the markup structure (though that's pretty much what BEM does in practice). – Josh Habdas Jan 9 '19 at 14:50
2

@voyager's answer about using data-* attribute (e.g. data-gender="female|male" is the most effective and standards compliant approach as of 2017:

[data-gender='male'] {background-color: #000; color: #ccc;}

Pretty much most goals can be attained as there are some albeit limited selectors oriented around text. The ::first-letter is a pseudo-element that can apply limited styling to the first letter of an element. There is also a ::first-line pseudo-element besides obviously selecting the first line of an element (such as a paragraph) also implies that it is obvious that CSS could be used to extend this existing capability to style specific aspects of a textNode.

Until such advocacy succeeds and is implemented the next best thing I could suggest when applicable is to explode/split words using a space deliminator, output each individual word inside of a span element and then if the word/styling goal is predictable use in combination with :nth selectors:

$p = explode(' ',$words);
foreach ($p as $key1 => $value1)
{
 echo '<span>'.$value1.'</span>;
}

Else if not predictable to, again, use voyager's answer about using data-* attribute. An example using PHP:

$p = explode(' ',$words);
foreach ($p as $key1 => $value1)
{
 echo '<span data-word="'.$value1.'">'.$value1.'</span>;
}
1

Most of the answers here try to offer alternative to how to write the HTML code to include more data because at least up to CSS3 you cannot select an element by partial inner text. But it can be done, you just need to add a bit of vanilla JavaScript, notice since female also contains male it will be selected:

      cells = document.querySelectorAll('td');
    	console.log(cells);
      [].forEach.call(cells, function (el) {
    	if(el.innerText.indexOf("male") !== -1){
    	//el.click(); click or any other option
    	console.log(el)
    	}
    });
 <table>
      <tr>
        <td>Peter</td>
        <td>male</td>
        <td>34</td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>Susanne</td>
        <td>female</td>
        <td>14</td>
      </tr>
    </table>

<table>
  <tr>
    <td data-content="Peter">Peter</td>
    <td data-content="male">male</td>
    <td data-content="34">34</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td data-conten="Susanne">Susanne</td>
    <td data-content="female">female</td>
    <td data-content="14">14</td>
  </tr>
</table>
1

If you're using Chimp / Webdriver.io, they support a lot more CSS selectors than the CSS spec.

This, for example, will click on the first anchor that contains the words "Bad bear":

browser.click("a*=Bad Bear");
0

You could also use content with attr() and style table cells that are :not :empty:

th::after { content: attr(data-value) }
td::after { content: attr(data-value) }
td[data-value]:not(:empty) {
  color: fuchsia;
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <th data-value="Peter"></th>
    <td data-value="male">&#x0200B;</td>
    <td data-value="34"></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <th data-value="Susanne"></th>
    <td data-value="female"></td>
    <td data-value="12"></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <th data-value="Lucas"></th>
    <td data-value="male">&#x0200B;</td>
    <td data-value="41"></td>
  </tr>
</table>

A ZeroWidthSpace is used to change the color and may be added using vanilla JavaScript:

const hombres = document.querySelectorAll('td[data-value="male"]');
hombres.forEach(hombre => hombre.innerHTML = '&#x0200B;');

Although the <td>s end tag may be omitted doing so may cause it to be treated as non-empty.

0

If you don't create the DOM yourself (e.g. in a userscript) you can do the following with pure JS:

for ( td of document.querySelectorAll('td') ) {
  console.debug("text:", td, td.innerText)
  td.setAttribute('text', td.innerText)
}
for ( td of document.querySelectorAll('td[text="male"]') )
  console.debug("male:", td, td.innerText)
<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Peter</td>
    <td>male</td>
    <td>34</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Susanne</td>
    <td>female</td>
    <td>12</td>
  </tr>
</table>

Console output

text: <td> Peter
text: <td> male
text: <td> 34
text: <td> Susanne
text: <td> female
text: <td> 12
male: <td text="male"> male
-2

Doing small Filter Widgets like this:

    var searchField = document.querySelector('HOWEVER_YOU_MAY_FIND_IT')
    var faqEntries = document.querySelectorAll('WRAPPING_ELEMENT .entry')

    searchField.addEventListener('keyup', function (evt) {
        var testValue = evt.target.value.toLocaleLowerCase();
        var regExp = RegExp(testValue);

        faqEntries.forEach(function (entry) {
            var text = entry.textContent.toLocaleLowerCase();

            entry.classList.remove('show', 'hide');

            if (regExp.test(text)) {
                entry.classList.add('show')
            } else {
                entry.classList.add('hide')
            }
        })
    })
-2

The syntax of this question looks like Robot Framework syntax. In this case, although there is no css selector that you can use for contains, there is a SeleniumLibrary keyword that you can use instead. The Wait Until Element Contains.

Example:

Wait Until Element Contains  | ${element} | ${contains}
Wait Until Element Contains  |  td | male

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