120

I have the following method:

namespace ListHelper
{
    public class ListHelper<T>
    {
        public static bool ContainsAllItems(List<T> a, List<T> b)
        {
            return b.TrueForAll(delegate(T t)
            {
                return a.Contains(t);
            });
        }
    }
}

The purpose of which is to determine if a List contains all the elements of another list. It would appear to me that something like this would be built into .NET already, is that the case and am I duplicating functionality?

Edit: My apologies for not stating up front that I'm using this code on Mono version 2.4.2.

2

6 Answers 6

209

If you're using .NET 3.5, it's easy:

public class ListHelper<T>
{
    public static bool ContainsAllItems(List<T> a, List<T> b)
    {
        return !b.Except(a).Any();
    }
}

This checks whether there are any elements in b which aren't in a - and then inverts the result.

Note that it would be slightly more conventional to make the method generic rather than the class, and there's no reason to require List<T> instead of IEnumerable<T> - so this would probably be preferred:

public static class LinqExtras // Or whatever
{
    public static bool ContainsAllItems<T>(this IEnumerable<T> a, IEnumerable<T> b)
    {
        return !b.Except(a).Any();
    }
}
9
  • 1
    This is untested, but wouldn't return b.Except(a).Empty(); be much more readable ?
    – Nils
    Commented Oct 5, 2009 at 15:13
  • 7
    Except that Empty() doesn't return a boolean. It returns an IEnumerable<T> with no items. Commented Oct 5, 2009 at 15:27
  • 2
    You can use LINQ to Objects in Mono, I believe... but it would be helpful if you'd state the requirements in the question to start with. Which version of Mono are you using?
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Oct 5, 2009 at 16:37
  • 1
    If the lists are length n and m, what's the time complexity of this algorithm? Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 16:50
  • 1
    @ColonelPanic: Assuming no hash collisions, O(n+m).
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Jan 5, 2016 at 16:52
51

Included in .NET 4: Enumerable.All

public static bool ContainsAll<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, IEnumerable<T> values)
{
    return values.All(value => source.Contains(value));
}
1
36

Just for fun, @JonSkeet's answer as an extension method:

/// <summary>
/// Does a list contain all values of another list?
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>Needs .NET 3.5 or greater.  Source:  https://stackoverflow.com/a/1520664/1037948 </remarks>
/// <typeparam name="T">list value type</typeparam>
/// <param name="containingList">the larger list we're checking in</param>
/// <param name="lookupList">the list to look for in the containing list</param>
/// <returns>true if it has everything</returns>
public static bool ContainsAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> containingList, IEnumerable<T> lookupList) {
    return ! lookupList.Except(containingList).Any();
}
2
  • 2
    similarly: Contains Any = public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle) { return haystack.Intersect(needle).Count() > 0; }. I tried some quick performance comparisons to haystack.Count() - 1 >= haystack.Except(needle).Count(); and Intersect seemed to do better most of the time.
    – drzaus
    Commented May 23, 2013 at 16:21
  • 4
    sheesh...use Any() not Count() > 0: public static bool ContainsAny<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle) { return haystack.Intersect(needle).Any(); }
    – drzaus
    Commented Jun 4, 2013 at 14:34
3

I know a way using LinQ methods. It's a bit weird to read, but works pretty well

var motherList = new List<string> { "Hello", "World", "User };
var sonList = new List<string> { "Hello", "User" };

You want to check if sonList is totally in motherList

To do so:

sonList.All(str => moterList.Any(word => word == str));

// Reading literally, would be like "For each of all items 
// in sonList, test if it's in motherList

Please check it on and see if works there too. Hope it helps ;-)

1
  • This works. But please correct the typo in this line: bool result = sonList.All(str => motherList.Any(word => word == str));
    – Shubhjot
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 18:07
-1

You could also use another way. Override equals and use this

public bool ContainsAll(List<T> a,List<T> check)
{
   list l = new List<T>(check);
   foreach(T _t in a)
   {
      if(check.Contains(t))
      {
         check.Remove(t);
         if(check.Count == 0)
         {
            return true;
         }
      }
      return false;
   }
}
1
  • 2
    list l = new List<T>(check); I dont think this would compile and if it does, its totally unecessary as check is already a list Commented Oct 7, 2015 at 11:22
-1
    public static bool ContainsAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> containingList, IEnumerable<T> lookupList)
    {
        return containingList.Intersect(lookupList).Count() == lookupList.Count();
    }
1
  • Thank you for your interest in contributing to the Stack Overflow community. This question already has quite a few answers—including one that has been extensively validated by the community. Are you certain your approach hasn’t been given previously? If so, it would be useful to explain how your approach is different, under what circumstances your approach might be preferred, and/or why you think the previous answers aren’t sufficient. Can you kindly edit your answer to offer an explanation? Commented Mar 22 at 0:19

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