31

I need to be able to build different versions of a go application; a 'debug' version and a normal version.

This is easy to do; I simply have a const DEBUG, that controls the behaviour of the application, but it's annoying to have to edit the config file every time I need to swap between build types.

I was reading about go build (http://golang.org/pkg/go/build/) and tags, I thought perhaps I could do this:

config.go:

// +build !debug
package build
const DEBUG = false

config.debug.go:

// +build debug
package build
const DEBUG = true

Then I should be able to build using go build or go build -tags debug, and the tags should exclude config.go and include config.debug.go.

...but this doesn't work. I get:

src/build/config.go:3: DEBUG redeclared in this block (<0>) previous declaration at src/build/config.debug.go:3

What am I doing wrong?

Is there another and more appropriate #ifdef style way of doing this I should be using?

1
  • See below for an update with Go 1.17
    – blackgreen
    Jul 6, 2021 at 11:22

3 Answers 3

31

See my answer to another question. You need a blank line after the // +build line.

Also, you probably want the ! in config.go, not in config.debug.go; and presumably you want one to be "DEBUG = false".

1
23

You could use compile time constants for that: If you compile your program with

go build -ldflags '-X main.DEBUG=YES' test.go

the variable DEBUG from package main will be set to the string "YES". Otherwise it keeps its declared contents.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

var DEBUG = "NO"

func main() {
    fmt.Printf("DEBUG is %q\n", DEBUG)
}

Edit: since Go 1.6(?) the switch is -X main.DEBUG=YES, before that it was -X main.DEBUG YES (without the =). Thanks to a comment from @poorva.

2
  • 1
    Is this possible for non-string data? Oct 6, 2014 at 13:59
  • @MattJoiner didn't test everything but it is possible with ints. Feb 9, 2015 at 2:18
3

As of Go 1.17, build tags can be specified with the new //go:build syntax.

As for the placement of the //go:build directive, the new design states:

Constraints may appear in any kind of source file (not just Go), but they must appear near the top of the file, preceded only by blank lines and other // and /* */ comments. These rules mean that in Go files a build constraint must appear before the package clause.

So you still need to leave a blank line between the //go:build directive and the package statement, otherwise it could be parsed as package documentation, however now:

  • the compiler will reject misplaced directives
  • running go fmt will automatically fix misplaced directives

For example running go fmt on (no blank line):

//go:build foo
package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    fmt.Println("Hello world")
}

gives (with blank line):

//go:build foo

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    fmt.Println("Hello world")
}

See also this answer for further details about what changes with the new syntax.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.