192

I have a dataset called spam which contains 58 columns and approximately 3500 rows of data related to spam messages.

I plan on running some linear regression on this dataset in the future, but I'd like to do some pre-processing beforehand and standardize the columns to have zero mean and unit variance.

I've been told the best way to go about this is with R, so I'd like to ask how can i achieve normalization with R? I've already got the data properly loaded and I'm just looking for some packages or methods to perform this task.

13 Answers 13

498

I have to assume you meant to say that you wanted a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1. If your data is in a dataframe and all the columns are numeric you can simply call the scale function on the data to do what you want.

dat <- data.frame(x = rnorm(10, 30, .2), y = runif(10, 3, 5))
scaled.dat <- scale(dat)

# check that we get mean of 0 and sd of 1
colMeans(scaled.dat)  # faster version of apply(scaled.dat, 2, mean)
apply(scaled.dat, 2, sd)

Using built in functions is classy. Like this cat:

enter image description here

  • 22
    Yes my mistake I meant 0 mean. And that is quite a classy cat – Hoser Mar 5 '13 at 3:51
  • 7
    +1 using apply can be slow also like this fat cat:) (colMeans here) – agstudy Mar 5 '13 at 3:52
  • 61
    I'm downvoting because I find the cat distasteful. -1 – Tyler Rinker Nov 6 '13 at 14:15
  • 130
    this site needs more cats +1 – LoveMeow Jul 23 '14 at 22:38
  • 32
    Warning: scale also transforms the data frame into a matrix – Julian Karls Nov 30 '16 at 11:47
79

Realizing that the question is old and one answer is accepted, I'll provide another answer for reference.

scale is limited by the fact that it scales all variables. The solution below allows to scale only specific variable names while preserving other variables unchanged (and the variable names could be dynamically generated):

library(dplyr)

set.seed(1234)
dat <- data.frame(x = rnorm(10, 30, .2), 
                  y = runif(10, 3, 5),
                  z = runif(10, 10, 20))
dat

dat2 <- dat %>% mutate_each_(funs(scale(.) %>% as.vector), 
                             vars=c("y","z"))
dat2

which gives me this:

> dat
          x        y        z
1  29.75859 3.633225 14.56091
2  30.05549 3.605387 12.65187
3  30.21689 3.318092 13.04672
4  29.53086 3.079992 15.07307
5  30.08582 3.437599 11.81096
6  30.10121 4.621197 17.59671
7  29.88505 4.051395 12.01248
8  29.89067 4.829316 12.58810
9  29.88711 4.662690 19.92150
10 29.82199 3.091541 18.07352

and

> dat2 <- dat %>% mutate_each_(funs(scale(.) %>% as.vector), 
>                              vars=c("y","z"))
> dat2
          x          y           z
1  29.75859 -0.3004815 -0.06016029
2  30.05549 -0.3423437 -0.72529604
3  30.21689 -0.7743696 -0.58772361
4  29.53086 -1.1324181  0.11828039
5  30.08582 -0.5946582 -1.01827752
6  30.10121  1.1852038  0.99754666
7  29.88505  0.3283513 -0.94806607
8  29.89067  1.4981677 -0.74751378
9  29.88711  1.2475998  1.80753470
10 29.82199 -1.1150515  1.16367556

EDIT 1 (2016): Addressed Julian's comment: the output of scale is Nx1 matrix so ideally we should add an as.vector to convert the matrix type back into a vector type. Thanks Julian!

EDIT 2 (2019): Quoting Duccio A.'s comment: For the latest dplyr (version 0.8) you need to change dplyr::funcs with list, like dat %>% mutate_each_(list(~scale(.) %>% as.vector), vars=c("y","z"))

  • This method works perfectly, specially when I have combination of categorical and numerical variables. I just have one question what does this operator means "%>%"? – weber85 Jun 24 '15 at 5:52
  • 8
    @weber85, it is a "pipe" operator (from functional programming). Instead of writing f(g(x)) it would look nicer if one writes x %>% g %>% f. In other words, dat %>% mutate_each_(funs(scale),vars=c("y","z")) is just mutate_each_(dat,funs(scale),vars=c("y","z")). The operator helps a lot when a chain is very long since f(g(h(i(j(x))))) can be very hard to read. – akhmed Jun 24 '15 at 18:32
  • Using this approach the columns on which scale is applied to are transferred from vector (class numeric) to Nx1 matrices. This might (and in my case did) cause some errors in packages that assume each column of a data.frame is a vector. – Julian Karls Nov 30 '16 at 11:49
  • 2
    For the latest dplyr (version 0.8) you need to change dplyr::funcs with list, like dat %>% mutate_each_(list(~scale(.) %>% as.vector), vars=c("y","z")) – Duccio A Mar 26 '19 at 15:48
  • 2
    mutate_each_() is now deprecated. You can use mutate_at() instead. The new way to do it would be: dat2 <- dat %>% mutate_at(c("y", "z"), scale) – mj_whales Oct 16 '19 at 6:34
58

This is 3 years old. Still, I feel I have to add the following:

The most common normalization is the z-transformation, where you subtract the mean and divide by the standard deviation of your variable. The result will have mean=0 and sd=1.

For that, you don't need any package.

zVar <- (myVar - mean(myVar)) / sd(myVar)

That's it.

  • Totally a simple way to perform this. Thanks – Pedro Neves Oct 11 '16 at 17:42
  • And makes using it dplyr much easier: mutate(var = (var - mean(var))/sd(var)). – RobertMyles Jun 2 '17 at 17:41
  • But can this be used to get the z-score for two variables? – lf_araujo Jul 11 '17 at 20:42
  • to denormalize myVar <- (zVar * sd(zVar)) + mean(zVar), right? – Artur_Indio Aug 14 '17 at 20:52
  • 3
    @Artur_Indio Almost: newVar <- (zVar * sd(myVar)) + mean(myVar). You have to use the original mean/sd. As you wrote it, you'll multiply by sd(zVar)=1 and add mean(zVar)=0, so nothing will change :) – random_forest_fanatic Apr 24 '18 at 17:08
22

'Caret' package provides methods for preprocessing data (e.g. centering and scaling). You could also use the following code:

library(caret)
# Assuming goal class is column 10
preObj <- preProcess(data[, -10], method=c("center", "scale"))
newData <- predict(preObj, data[, -10])

More details: http://www.inside-r.org/node/86978

16

When I used the solution stated by Dason, instead of getting a data frame as a result, I got a vector of numbers (the scaled values of my df).

In case someone is having the same trouble, you have to add as.data.frame() to the code, like this:

df.scaled <- as.data.frame(scale(df))

I hope this is will be useful for ppl having the same issue!

13

You can easily normalize the data also using data.Normalization function in clusterSim package. It provides different method of data normalization.

    data.Normalization (x,type="n0",normalization="column")

Arguments

x
vector, matrix or dataset type
type of normalization: n0 - without normalization

n1 - standardization ((x-mean)/sd)

n2 - positional standardization ((x-median)/mad)

n3 - unitization ((x-mean)/range)

n3a - positional unitization ((x-median)/range)

n4 - unitization with zero minimum ((x-min)/range)

n5 - normalization in range <-1,1> ((x-mean)/max(abs(x-mean)))

n5a - positional normalization in range <-1,1> ((x-median)/max(abs(x-median)))

n6 - quotient transformation (x/sd)

n6a - positional quotient transformation (x/mad)

n7 - quotient transformation (x/range)

n8 - quotient transformation (x/max)

n9 - quotient transformation (x/mean)

n9a - positional quotient transformation (x/median)

n10 - quotient transformation (x/sum)

n11 - quotient transformation (x/sqrt(SSQ))

n12 - normalization ((x-mean)/sqrt(sum((x-mean)^2)))

n12a - positional normalization ((x-median)/sqrt(sum((x-median)^2)))

n13 - normalization with zero being the central point ((x-midrange)/(range/2))

normalization
"column" - normalization by variable, "row" - normalization by object

  • this package is not available for R version 3.4.3 – JdP Jan 25 '18 at 7:28
10

With dplyr v0.7.4 all variables can be scaled by using mutate_all():

library(dplyr)
#> 
#> Attaching package: 'dplyr'
#> The following objects are masked from 'package:stats':
#> 
#>     filter, lag
#> The following objects are masked from 'package:base':
#> 
#>     intersect, setdiff, setequal, union
library(tibble)

set.seed(1234)
dat <- tibble(x = rnorm(10, 30, .2), 
              y = runif(10, 3, 5),
              z = runif(10, 10, 20))

dat %>% mutate_all(scale)
#> # A tibble: 10 x 3
#>         x      y       z
#>     <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl>
#>  1 -0.827 -0.300 -0.0602
#>  2  0.663 -0.342 -0.725 
#>  3  1.47  -0.774 -0.588 
#>  4 -1.97  -1.13   0.118 
#>  5  0.816 -0.595 -1.02  
#>  6  0.893  1.19   0.998 
#>  7 -0.192  0.328 -0.948 
#>  8 -0.164  1.50  -0.748 
#>  9 -0.182  1.25   1.81  
#> 10 -0.509 -1.12   1.16

Specific variables can be excluded using mutate_at():

dat %>% mutate_at(scale, .vars = vars(-x))
#> # A tibble: 10 x 3
#>        x      y       z
#>    <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl>
#>  1  29.8 -0.300 -0.0602
#>  2  30.1 -0.342 -0.725 
#>  3  30.2 -0.774 -0.588 
#>  4  29.5 -1.13   0.118 
#>  5  30.1 -0.595 -1.02  
#>  6  30.1  1.19   0.998 
#>  7  29.9  0.328 -0.948 
#>  8  29.9  1.50  -0.748 
#>  9  29.9  1.25   1.81  
#> 10  29.8 -1.12   1.16

Created on 2018-04-24 by the reprex package (v0.2.0).

8

Again, even though this is an old question, it is very relevant! And I have found a simple way to normalise certain columns without the need of any packages:

normFunc <- function(x){(x-mean(x, na.rm = T))/sd(x, na.rm = T)}

For example

x<-rnorm(10,14,2)
y<-rnorm(10,7,3)
z<-rnorm(10,18,5)
df<-data.frame(x,y,z)

df[2:3] <- apply(df[2:3], 2, normFunc)

You will see that the y and z columns have been normalised. No packages needed :-)

7

Scale can be used for both full data frame and specific columns. For specific columns, following code can be used:

trainingSet[, 3:7] = scale(trainingSet[, 3:7]) # For column 3 to 7
trainingSet[, 8] = scale(trainingSet[, 8]) # For column 8 

Full data frame

trainingSet <- scale(trainingSet)
2

The dplyr package has two functions that do this.

> require(dplyr)

To mutate specific columns of a data table, you can use the function mutate_at(). To mutate all columns, you can use mutate_all.

The following is a brief example for using these functions to standardize data.

Mutate specific columns:

dt = data.table(a = runif(3500), b = runif(3500), c = runif(3500))
dt = data.table(dt %>% mutate_at(vars("a", "c"), scale)) # can also index columns by number, e.g., vars(c(1,3))

> apply(dt, 2, mean)
            a             b             c 
 1.783137e-16  5.064855e-01 -5.245395e-17 

> apply(dt, 2, sd)
        a         b         c 
1.0000000 0.2906622 1.0000000 

Mutate all columns:

dt = data.table(a = runif(3500), b = runif(3500), c = runif(3500))
dt = data.table(dt %>% mutate_all(scale))

> apply(dt, 2, mean)
            a             b             c 
-1.728266e-16  9.291994e-17  1.683551e-16 

> apply(dt, 2, sd)
a b c 
1 1 1 
1

Before I happened to find this thread, I had the same problem. I had user dependant column types, so I wrote a for loop going through them and getting needed columns scale'd. There are probably better ways to do it, but this solved the problem just fine:

 for(i in 1:length(colnames(df))) {
        if(class(df[,i]) == "numeric" || class(df[,i]) == "integer") {
            df[,i] <- as.vector(scale(df[,i])) }
        }

as.vector is a needed part, because it turned out scale does rownames x 1 matrix which is usually not what you want to have in your data.frame.

0

Use the package "recommenderlab". Download and install the package. This package has a command "Normalize" in built. It also allows you to choose one of the many methods for normalization namely 'center' or 'Z-score' Follow the following example:

## create a matrix with ratings
m <- matrix(sample(c(NA,0:5),50, replace=TRUE, prob=c(.5,rep(.5/6,6))),nrow=5, ncol=10, dimnames = list(users=paste('u', 1:5, sep=&rdquo;), items=paste('i', 1:10, sep=&rdquo;)))

## do normalization
r <- as(m, "realRatingMatrix")
#here, 'centre' is the default method
r_n1 <- normalize(r) 
#here "Z-score" is the used method used
r_n2 <- normalize(r, method="Z-score")

r
r_n1
r_n2

## show normalized data
image(r, main="Raw Data")
image(r_n1, main="Centered")
image(r_n2, main="Z-Score Normalization")
  • This answer doesn't address the question. – f0nzie Dec 26 '17 at 19:31
0

The normalize function from the BBMisc package was the right tool for me since it can deal with NA values.

Here is how to use it:

Given the following dataset,

    ASR_API     <- c("CV",  "F",    "IER",  "LS-c", "LS-o")
    Human       <- c(NA,    5.8,    12.7,   NA, NA)
    Google      <- c(23.2,  24.2,   16.6,   12.1,   28.8)
    GoogleCloud <- c(23.3,  26.3,   18.3,   12.3,   27.3)
    IBM     <- c(21.8,  47.6,   24.0,   9.8,    25.3)
    Microsoft   <- c(29.1,  28.1,   23.1,   18.8,   35.9)
    Speechmatics    <- c(19.1,  38.4,   21.4,   7.3,    19.4)
    Wit_ai      <- c(35.6,  54.2,   37.4,   19.2,   41.7)
    dt     <- data.table(ASR_API,Human, Google, GoogleCloud, IBM, Microsoft, Speechmatics, Wit_ai)
> dt
   ASR_API Human Google GoogleCloud  IBM Microsoft Speechmatics Wit_ai
1:      CV    NA   23.2        23.3 21.8      29.1         19.1   35.6
2:       F   5.8   24.2        26.3 47.6      28.1         38.4   54.2
3:     IER  12.7   16.6        18.3 24.0      23.1         21.4   37.4
4:    LS-c    NA   12.1        12.3  9.8      18.8          7.3   19.2
5:    LS-o    NA   28.8        27.3 25.3      35.9         19.4   41.7

normalized values can be obtained like this:

> dtn <- normalize(dt, method = "standardize", range = c(0, 1), margin = 1L, on.constant = "quiet")
> dtn
   ASR_API      Human     Google GoogleCloud         IBM  Microsoft Speechmatics      Wit_ai
1:      CV         NA  0.3361245   0.2893457 -0.28468670  0.3247336  -0.18127203 -0.16032655
2:       F -0.7071068  0.4875320   0.7715885  1.59862532  0.1700986   1.55068347  1.31594762
3:     IER  0.7071068 -0.6631646  -0.5143923 -0.12409420 -0.6030768   0.02512682 -0.01746131
4:    LS-c         NA -1.3444981  -1.4788780 -1.16064578 -1.2680075  -1.24018782 -1.46198764
5:    LS-o         NA  1.1840062   0.9323361 -0.02919864  1.3762521  -0.15435044  0.32382788

where hand calculated method just ignores colmuns containing NAs:

> dt %>% mutate(normalizedHuman = (Human - mean(Human))/sd(Human)) %>% 
+ mutate(normalizedGoogle = (Google - mean(Google))/sd(Google)) %>% 
+ mutate(normalizedGoogleCloud = (GoogleCloud - mean(GoogleCloud))/sd(GoogleCloud)) %>% 
+ mutate(normalizedIBM = (IBM - mean(IBM))/sd(IBM)) %>% 
+ mutate(normalizedMicrosoft = (Microsoft - mean(Microsoft))/sd(Microsoft)) %>% 
+ mutate(normalizedSpeechmatics = (Speechmatics - mean(Speechmatics))/sd(Speechmatics)) %>% 
+ mutate(normalizedWit_ai = (Wit_ai - mean(Wit_ai))/sd(Wit_ai))
  ASR_API Human Google GoogleCloud  IBM Microsoft Speechmatics Wit_ai normalizedHuman normalizedGoogle
1      CV    NA   23.2        23.3 21.8      29.1         19.1   35.6              NA        0.3361245
2       F   5.8   24.2        26.3 47.6      28.1         38.4   54.2              NA        0.4875320
3     IER  12.7   16.6        18.3 24.0      23.1         21.4   37.4              NA       -0.6631646
4    LS-c    NA   12.1        12.3  9.8      18.8          7.3   19.2              NA       -1.3444981
5    LS-o    NA   28.8        27.3 25.3      35.9         19.4   41.7              NA        1.1840062
  normalizedGoogleCloud normalizedIBM normalizedMicrosoft normalizedSpeechmatics normalizedWit_ai
1             0.2893457   -0.28468670           0.3247336            -0.18127203      -0.16032655
2             0.7715885    1.59862532           0.1700986             1.55068347       1.31594762
3            -0.5143923   -0.12409420          -0.6030768             0.02512682      -0.01746131
4            -1.4788780   -1.16064578          -1.2680075            -1.24018782      -1.46198764
5             0.9323361   -0.02919864           1.3762521            -0.15435044       0.32382788

(normalizedHuman is made a list of NAs ...)

regarding the selection of specific columns for calculation, a generic method can be employed like this one:

data_vars <- df_full %>% dplyr::select(-ASR_API,-otherVarNotToBeUsed)
meta_vars <- df_full %>% dplyr::select(ASR_API,otherVarNotToBeUsed)
data_varsn <- normalize(data_vars, method = "standardize", range = c(0, 1), margin = 1L, on.constant = "quiet")
dtn <- cbind(meta_vars,data_varsn)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.