35

What I mean is the following:

  double d1 =555;
  double d2=55.343

I want to be able to tell that d1 is an integer while d2 is not. Is there an easy way to do it in c/c++?

  • There are hacks to make it work, but the way that a double represents it's value means that it is quite possibly not storing an integer as you think it would. It may store 555 as 554.99999998 or something funny like that. There is no way to tell really, unless you have the original source values and figure it out from there. float and double are limited precision. – Ape-inago Oct 5 '09 at 18:30
  • 5
    @Ape-inago: Actually, a double which is assigned an integer value will actually equal that value. And adding, subtracting, and multiplying by integral-valued doubles also yields an integral-valued double. However, once you multiply by an arbitrary double or divide by a double, all bets are off. – rlbond Oct 5 '09 at 18:51
  • 3
    rlbond, assuming the integer in question is sufficiently small. – avakar Oct 5 '09 at 18:56
  • 2
    What do you want d3 = 3.0 * (1.0 / 3.0) to return? Integer or not? As rlbond pointed out, multiplying by a non-integral double or dividing by anything is likely to result in something that may be extremely close to an integer, but may not be represented as a floating-point integer. – David Thornley Oct 5 '09 at 19:39
  • 1
    @Jamie: 53 bits – Stephen Canon Oct 6 '09 at 14:56

13 Answers 13

69

Use std::modf:

double intpart;
modf(value, &intpart) == 0.0

Don't convert to int! The number 1.0e+300 is an integer too you know.

Edit: As Pete Kirkham points out, passing 0 as the second argument is not guaranteed by the standard to work, requiring the use of a dummy variable and, unfortunately, making the code a lot less elegant.

  • 18
    I had no idea modf existed util now. – GManNickG Oct 5 '09 at 18:35
  • 2
    Agreed. +1 for nuggets in the C standard library. Though I would use NULL instead of 0 but I understand that's a rather contentious issue in C++ for no good reason. – Chris Lutz Oct 5 '09 at 18:44
  • 3
    In fact, passing 0 as the second argument is not only not guaranteed to work, but will crash on many platforms. – Stephen Canon Oct 6 '09 at 3:59
  • 6
    I think you better compare modf return value to epsilon rather than zero – qrdl Oct 6 '09 at 7:51
  • 3
    Any vaguely competent implementation of modf on a host with IEEE-754 arithmetic will always produce an exact fractional part. If your platform doesn't have a vaguely competent implementation of the math library, you should either stick to integer or (better) find a new platform. – Stephen Canon Oct 6 '09 at 12:43
9

Assuming you have the cmath <math.h> library, you can check the number against it's floor. If the number might be negative, make sure you get the absolute first.

bool double_is_int(double trouble) {
   double absolute = abs( trouble );
   return absolute == floor(absolute);
}
  • 7
    For sanity's sake, I recommend rethinking your choice of parameter name. – Alan Oct 5 '09 at 18:44
  • @Alan, good looking out. Changed it. – tj111 Oct 5 '09 at 18:49
  • 1
    I think there is no need to turn to absolute value first. – updogliu Feb 26 '12 at 3:31
  • I slightly smirked when I saw your chosen name for the parameter. Thanks, this worked for me. +1 – Charles Dec 24 '15 at 0:35
5

Assuming a c99 and IEEE-754 compliant environment,

(trunc(x) == x)

is another solution, and will (on most platforms) have slightly better performance than modf because it needs only to produce the integer part. Both are completely acceptable.

Note that trunc produces a double-precision result, so you don't need to worry about out of range type conversions as you would with (int)x.


Edit: as @pavon points out in a comment, you may need to add another check, depending on whether or not you care about infinity, and what result you want to get if x is infinite.

  • Note that this test will consider +/- infinity to be integers. – pavon Jul 18 '17 at 23:10
  • 1
    @pavon: It is almost reasonable to say that infinity is an even integer in IEEE 754 (in the sense that all sufficiently large floating-point numbers are even integers, so infinity "should be", too; this is nonsense, but appealing nonsense). – Stephen Canon Jul 24 '17 at 14:52
  • Well, all the tests on this page will consider a ±∞ to be an integer. – Константин Ван Mar 8 '18 at 1:14
  • 1
    @K._ No check for NaN is needed (unless you want to treat NaN as an integer), because NaN is not equal to itself. – Stephen Canon Mar 8 '18 at 14:09
  • Oh, really? I'm sorry; removed that one. Then I think this method would be the best among these answers. – Константин Ван Mar 8 '18 at 14:14
4

avakar was almost right - use modf, but the detail was off.

modf returns the fractional part, so the test should be that the result of modf is 0.0.

modf takes two arguments, the second of which should be a pointer of the same type as the first argument. Passing NULL or 0 causes a segmentation fault in the g++ runtime. The standard does not specify that passing 0 is safe; it might be that it happens to work on avakar's machine but don't do it.

You could also use fmod(a,b) which calculates the a modulo b passing 1.0. This also should give the fractional part.

#include<cmath>
#include<iostream>

int main ()
{
    double d1 = 555;
    double d2 = 55.343;

    double int_part1;
    double int_part2;

    using namespace std;

    cout << boolalpha;
    cout << d1 << " " << modf ( d1, &int_part1 ) << endl;
    cout << d1 << " " << ( modf ( d1, &int_part1 ) == 0.0 ) << endl;
    cout << d2 << " " << modf ( d2, &int_part2 ) << endl;
    cout << d1 << " " << ( modf ( d2, &int_part2 ) == 0.0 ) << endl;
    cout << d2 << " " << modf ( d2, &int_part2 ) << endl;
    cout << d1 << " " << ( modf ( d2, &int_part2 ) == 0.0 ) << endl;

    cout << d1 << " " << fmod ( d1, 1.0 ) << endl;
    cout << d1 << " " << ( fmod ( d1, 1.0 ) == 0 ) << endl;
    cout << d2 << " " << fmod ( d2, 1.0 ) << endl;
    cout << d2 << " " << ( fmod ( d2, 1.0 ) == 0 ) << endl;


    cout.flush();

    modf ( d1, 0 ); // segfault

}
  • +1, I've checked the standard and indeed it does require a pointer to an object as the second argument to modf. Thanks. – avakar Oct 5 '09 at 19:35
  • Oh, and you don't have to flush, passing endl does that for you. :-) – avakar Oct 5 '09 at 19:40
  • +1 causes a bus error on GCC on OS X too. If only the standards were clearer! – Chris Lutz Oct 5 '09 at 19:41
3

How about

if (abs(d1 - (round(d1))) < 0.000000001) {
   printf "Integer\n"; /* Can not use "==" since we are concerned about precision */
}

Fixed up to work using rounding to reflect bug Anna found

Alternate solutions:

if ((d1 - floor(d1) < 0.000000001) || (d1 - floor(d1) > 0.9999999999)) {
   /* Better store floor value in a temp variable to speed up */
   printf "Integer\n"; /* Can not use "==" since we are concerned about precision */
}

Theres also another one with taking floor, subtracting 0.5 and taking abs() of that and comparing to 0.499999999 but I figure it won't be a major performance improvement.

  • 6
    Integers (at least up to a certain size) are represented exactly in any real implementation of floating point numbers I can think of, so I don't think there's a need to worry about precision for this particular problem. – Laurence Gonsalves Oct 5 '09 at 18:26
  • 3
    What about the case where d1 = 0.999999999999999 ? – Anna Oct 5 '09 at 18:26
  • 1
    The only problem is that floor goes the wrong way for negative numbers. you should use trunc() – Martin York Oct 5 '09 at 18:35
  • 1
    @Jacob: You don't want to use the minimum value. You need a value that represents the accuracy you need for the application. – Martin York Oct 5 '09 at 18:38
  • 1
    I must apologize. I was fixated on numbers that were exactly integers, not close to integer, and round is a better choice for the solution you provided. – Mark Ransom Oct 6 '09 at 2:36
3
int iHaveNoFraction(double d){
    return d == trunc(d);
}

Now, it wouldn't be C if it didn't have about 40 years of language revisions...

In C, == returns int but in C++ it returns bool. At least on my Linux distro (Ubuntu) you need to either declare double trunc(double); or you could compile with -std=c99, or declare the level macro, all in order to get <math.h> to declare it.

  • 3
    Maybe make the return type bool, since this returns a boolean? – Daniel Bingham Oct 5 '09 at 18:31
  • trunc() is better than floor(). It works for negative numbers. – Martin York Oct 5 '09 at 18:36
  • Alcon, good point, it might be C++. Of course, in C, it is int. I've clarified things... – DigitalRoss Oct 5 '09 at 18:42
  • 1
    There is no trunc in C++ (except for ios::trunc). – avakar Oct 5 '09 at 18:44
  • 1
    But, of course, C++ standard refers to C89. – avakar Oct 5 '09 at 20:53
2

How about this?

if ((d1 - (int)d1) == 0)
    // integer
0

try:

bool isInteger(double d, double delta)
{
   double absd = abs(d);

   if( absd - floor(absd) > 0.5 )
      return (ceil(absd) - absd) < delta;

   return (d - floor(absd)) < delta;
}
0
#include <math.h>
#include <limits>

int main()
{
  double x, y, n;
  x = SOME_VAL;
  y = modf( x, &n ); // splits a floating-point value into fractional and integer parts
  if ( abs(y) < std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon() )
  {
    // no floating part
  }
}
0

Below you have the code for testing d1 and d2 keeping it very simple. The only thing you have to test is whether the variable value is equal to the same value converted to an int type. If this is not the case then it is not an integer.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    void checkType(double x);
    double d1 = 555;
    double d2 = 55.343;        
    checkType(d1);
    checkType(d2);
    system("Pause");
    return 0; 
}
void checkType(double x)
{
     if(x != (int)x)
     {
          cout<< x << " is not an integer "<< endl;
     }
     else 
     {
         cout << x << " is an integer " << endl;
     }
};
  • 1
    Please use SO code formatting. If a line begins with four spaces, SO will format it as code. – Chris Lutz Oct 5 '09 at 19:42
0

In many calculations you know that your floating point results will have a small numerical error that can result from a number of multiplications.

So what you may really want to find is the question is this number within say 1e-5 of an integer value. In that case I think this works better:

bool isInteger( double value )
{
    double flr = floor( value + 1e-5 );
    double diff = value - flr;
    return diff < 1e-5;
}
0

I faced a similar questions. As I needed to round the double anyway, that's what I find working:

double d = 2.000000001;
int i = std::round(d);
std::fabs(d-i) < 10 * std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon()
-1

A sample code snipped that does it:

if (  ABS( ((int) d1) - (d1)) )< 0.000000001) 

 cout <<"Integer" << endl;

else

 cout <<"Flaot" << endl;

EDIT: Changed it to reflect correct code.

  • 1
    What about 100.01? – Calyth Oct 5 '09 at 18:23
  • if the # is 1.0000000001 (as can be returned, for exampleDB backend) it will not work. – DVK Oct 5 '09 at 18:24
  • 2
    That is wrong since you can't use % on the double d1 – Jacob Oct 5 '09 at 18:24

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