I want to know how we identify the primary key duplication error from SQL Server error code in C#.

As a example, I have a C# form to enter data into a SQL Server database, when an error occurs while data entry, how can I identify the reason for the error from the exception?

up vote 49 down vote accepted

If you catch SqlException then see its number, the number 2627 would mean violation of unique constraint (including primary key).

try
{
    // insertion code
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    if (ex.Number == 2627)
    {
        //Violation of primary key. Handle Exception
    }
    else throw;
}

MSSQL_ENG002627

This is a general error that can be raised regardless of whether a database is replicated. In replicated databases, the error is typically raised because primary keys have not been managed appropriately across the topology.

  • 3
    @Roshan You have to use SqlException, not System.Exception, if you use them both, make sure that more specific exception has its catch block above the less specific exception (in this case catch block of SqlException has to be above the catch block of Exception). – Ivan G Mar 5 '13 at 7:20
  • 3
    I believe 2601 can also be a unique index violation – Brain2000 Jul 14 '15 at 16:06
  • 1
    also worth noting that you can use exception filtering so you end up with: try{ //insertion code } catch(SqlException ex) when (ex.Number == 2627){ //do something } – MJJames Oct 26 '16 at 10:51

This is an old thread but I guess it's worth noting that since C#6 you can:

try
{
    await command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancellation);
}
catch (SqlException ex) when (ex.Number == 2627)
{
    // Handle unique key violation
}

And with C#7 and a wrapping exception (like Entity Framework Core):

try
{
    await _context.SaveChangesAsync(cancellation);
}
catch (DbUpdateException ex) 
   when ((ex.InnerException as SqlException)?.Number == 2627)
{
    // Handle unique key violation
}

The biggest advantage of this approach in comparison with the accepted answer is:

In case the error number is not equal to 2627 and hence, it's not a unique key violation, the exception is not caught.

Without the exception filter (when) you'd better remember re-throwing that exception in case you can't handle it. And ideally not to forget to use ExceptionDispatchInfo so that the original stack is not lost.

In case of Entity Framework, the accepted answer won't work and the error will end up not being caught. Here is a test code, only the entity catch statement will be hit or of course the generic exception if entity statement removed:

try
{
    db.InsertProcedureCall(id);
}
catch (SqlException e0)
{
   // Won't catch
}
catch (EntityCommandExecutionException e1)
{
    // Will catch
    var se = e1.InnerException as SqlException;
    var code = se.Number;
}
catch (Exception e2)
{
   // if the Entity catch is removed, this will work too
    var se = e2.InnerException as SqlException;
    var code = se.Number;
}

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