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What is the object used in Python to specify date (and time) in Python?

For instance, to create an object that holds a given date and time, (let's say '05/10/09 18:00').

As per S.Lott's request, so far I have:

class Some:
    date =

I stop there. After the "=" sign for, I realize I didn't knew what the right object was ;)

4 Answers 4

102

Simple example:

>>> import datetime
# 05/10/09 18:00
>>> d = datetime.datetime(2009, 10, 5, 18, 00)
>>> print d.year, d.month, d.day, d.hour, d.second
2009 10 5 18 0
>>> print d.isoformat(' ')
2009-10-05 18:00:00
>>> 
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  • 2
    Documentation on datetime: docs.python.org/3/library/datetime.html. Note that only year, month, day are mandatory when calling datetime.datetime(). Ex: d = datetime.datetime(year, month, day) Commented Aug 30, 2018 at 18:12
  • In MicroPython, datetime is not existing, you can use utime instead
    – Bruno L.
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 8:47
8

Nick D has the official way of handling your problem. If you want to pass in a string like you did in your question, the dateutil module (http://labix.org/python-dateutil) has excellent support for that kind of thing.

For examples, I'm going to copy and paste from another answer I gave a while back now:

Simple example:

>>> parse("Thu Sep 25 2003")
datetime.datetime(2003, 9, 25, 0, 0)

>>> parse("Sep 25 2003")
datetime.datetime(2003, 9, 25, 0, 0)

>>> parse("Sep 2003", default=DEFAULT)
datetime.datetime(2003, 9, 25, 0, 0)

>>> parse("Sep", default=DEFAULT)
datetime.datetime(2003, 9, 25, 0, 0)

>>> parse("2003", default=DEFAULT)
datetime.datetime(2003, 9, 25, 0, 0)

To ambigous:

>>> parse("10-09-2003")
datetime.datetime(2003, 10, 9, 0, 0)

>>> parse("10-09-2003", dayfirst=True)
datetime.datetime(2003, 9, 10, 0, 0)

>>> parse("10-09-03")
datetime.datetime(2003, 10, 9, 0, 0)

>>> parse("10-09-03", yearfirst=True)
datetime.datetime(2010, 9, 3, 0, 0)

To all over the board:

>>> parse("Wed, July 10, '96")
datetime.datetime(1996, 7, 10, 0, 0)

>>> parse("1996.07.10 AD at 15:08:56 PDT", ignoretz=True)
datetime.datetime(1996, 7, 10, 15, 8, 56)

>>> parse("Tuesday, April 12, 1952 AD 3:30:42pm PST", ignoretz=True)
datetime.datetime(1952, 4, 12, 15, 30, 42)

>>> parse("November 5, 1994, 8:15:30 am EST", ignoretz=True)
datetime.datetime(1994, 11, 5, 8, 15, 30)

>>> parse("3rd of May 2001")
datetime.datetime(2001, 5, 3, 0, 0)

>>> parse("5:50 A.M. on June 13, 1990")
datetime.datetime(1990, 6, 13, 5, 50)

Take a look at the documentation for it here:

http://labix.org/python-dateutil#head-c0e81a473b647dfa787dc11e8c69557ec2c3ecd2

0
4

Look at the datetime module; there are datetime, date and timedelta class definitions.

3
  • 2
    I looked at that already but didn't knew where to start, the doc in too large
    – OscarRyz
    Commented Oct 5, 2009 at 19:28
  • 3
    @Oscar Reyes: with a vague, open-ended question like yours, it's really hard to pinpoint the exact line of documentation that's relevant. You could, for example, provide a code-snippet that shows what you wish to do. You could provide a more detailed question.
    – S.Lott
    Commented Oct 5, 2009 at 19:44
  • I was more telling you what I've got so far than updating my question. Anyway, I've posted my current code in the question, as you see there was not much to show. :( Thanks for the link anyway.
    – OscarRyz
    Commented Oct 5, 2009 at 21:19
2
>>> import datetime
>>> datetime.datetime.strptime('05/10/09 18:00', '%d/%m/%y %H:%M')
datetime.datetime(2009, 10, 5, 18, 0)
>>> datetime.datetime.today()
datetime.datetime(2009, 10, 5, 21, 3, 55, 827787)

So, you can either use format string to convert to datetime.datetime object or if you're particularly looking at today's date could use today() function.

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