28

How can I store an array of doubles to database using Entity Framework Code-First with no impact on the existing code and architecture design?

I've looked at Data Annotation and Fluent API, I've also considered converting the double array to a string of bytes and store that byte to the database in it own column.

I cannot access the public double[] Data { get; set; } property with Fluent API, the error message I then get is:

The type double[] must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T'.

The class where Data is stored is successfully stored in the database, and the relationships to this class. I'm only missing the Data column.

6
  • What does the data represent? Maybe there's a way to tweak your code to make everything work without changing the architecture too much. – Nathan White Mar 5 '13 at 10:05
  • Or, for a simple fix, could you not make a comma-separated string with all of the double values when writing to the database, then parse the string when you need the values? – Nathan White Mar 5 '13 at 10:06
  • @NathanWhite going with this comma separated string approach is something we're actually considering. But we would like something more automated from EF. Considering the answers to this tells me that there is no way to automatically say array of doubles to the database with EF. Correct? – jonas Mar 5 '13 at 10:22
  • 2
    Unfortunately, in EF, an array of primitives is not possible. Consider it if you were to apply an SQL statement to map your database... how would you store an array of doubles anyway? Mapping List<> of objects is possible because EF creates a resolved many-to-many relationship table set. With primitives, this is unfortunately not possible. It would be possible, however, if you created a class specifically to hold a double (with an ID because EF expects it) and have a List<class> in your model. – Nathan White Mar 5 '13 at 10:37
  • 1
    Some RDBMSes, like PostgreSQL, support arrays. This very issue is what stops me from using Entity Framework with PostgreSQL. – NathanAldenSr Sep 3 '16 at 22:57
48

You can do a thing like this :

    [NotMapped]
    public double[] Data
    {
        get
        {
            string[] tab = this.InternalData.Split(',');
            return new double[] { double.Parse(tab[0]), double.Parse(tab[1]) };
        }
        set
        {
            this.InternalData = string.Format("{0},{1}", value[0], value[1]);
        }
    }

    [EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
    public string InternalData { get; set; }
0
28

Thank you all for your inputs, due to your help I was able to track down the best way to solve this. Which is:

 public string InternalData { get; set; }
 public double[] Data
 {
    get
    {
        return Array.ConvertAll(InternalData.Split(';'), Double.Parse);                
    }
    set
    {
        _data = value;
        InternalData = String.Join(";", _data.Select(p => p.ToString()).ToArray());
    }
 }

Thanks to these stackoverflow posts: String to Doubles array and Array of Doubles to a String

2
  • 3
    In case anyone is wondering, InternalData has to be public, or it will not be part of the database schema. It may also be a good idea to add [NotMapped] to the Data attribute, even though it is unnecessary. This makes it clear that the attribute is not part of the database schema. – Florian Winter Oct 2 '17 at 11:37
  • The setter can be simplified to set => InternalData = string.Join(";", value); – Rudey Jan 8 at 15:33
5

I know it is a bit expensive, but you could do this

class Primitive
{
    public int PrimitiveId { get; set; }
    public double Data { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Reference ReferenceClass { get; set; }
}

// This is the class that requires an array of doubles
class Reference
{
    // Other EF stuff

    // EF-acceptable reference to an 'array' of doubles
    public virtual List<Primitive> Data { get; set; }
}

This will now map a single entity (here 'Reference') to a 'list' of your Primitive class. This is basically to allow the SQL database to be happy, and allow you to use your list of data appropriately.

This may not suit your needs, but will be a way to make EF happy.

4

It would be far easier if you use List<double> rather then double[]. You already have a table that stores your Data values. You probably have foreign key from some table to the table where your double values are stored. Create another model that reflects the table where doubles are stored and add foreign key mappings in the mappings class. That way you will not need to add some complex background logic which retrieves or stores values in a class property.

2

Nathan White has the best answer (got my vote).

Here is a small improvement over Joffrey Kern's answer to allow lists of any length (untested):

    [NotMapped]
    public IEnumerable<double> Data
    {
        get
        {
            var tab = InternalData.Split(',');
            return tab.Select(double.Parse).AsEnumerable();
        }
        set { InternalData = string.Join(",", value); }
    }

    [EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]
    public string InternalData { get; set; }
1

Don't use double[] use List insted.

Like this.

public class MyModel{
    ...
    public List<MyClass> Data { get; set; }
    ...
}

public class MyClass{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public double Value { get; set; }
}

All that solution that I see there are bad, because:

  1. If you create table, you don't want to store data like this: "99.5,89.65,78.5,15.5" that's not valid! Firstly its a string that means if you can type letter into it and at the moment when your ASP.NET server call double.Parse it will result in FormatException and that you really don't want!

  2. It's slower, because your server must parse the string. Why parse the string instead getting almost ready data from SQL Server to use?

2
  • 1
    You are not wrong. At the time though, I couldn't change the datatype. Today I would create a new model just for the database layer, and either store it as a List, or just put the raw json/xml inside a data property. I wrote this question 5 years ago, so my memory of the situation is a little dusty. – jonas May 29 '18 at 7:55
  • I wonder if it string parsing is really slower than your solution, which involves SQL joins. – Rudey Jan 8 at 15:28
1

If your collection can be null, and you want this to be preserved, do this:

[NotMapped]
public double[] Data
{
    get => InternalData != null ? Array.ConvertAll(Data.Split(';'), double.Parse) : null;
    set => InternalData = value != null ? string.Join(";", value) : null;
}

Also, specify [Column(TypeName = "varchar")] on the string property for a more efficient storage data type.

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