47

I am not familiar with Less. In my understanding, I think Less can transform the less format file to standard css file(if I am wrong, please correct me). Now I have a question below.

Say you would generate 100 CSS classes like below(from .span1 to .span100) in a single CSS file. I want to know whether less can generate a CSS file like it?

...
.span5 {
  width: 5%;
}

.span4 {
  width: 4%;
}

.span3 {
  width: 3%;
}

.span2 {
  width: 2%;
}

.span1 {
  width: 1%;
}
1
  • 8
    This is a perfectly legitimate question and is exactly the one I had. Please re-open this.
    – anushr
    Nov 17, 2013 at 5:32

4 Answers 4

64

Update, 3/28/2022:

Requires Less v3.9.0

each(range(1%, 100%, 1), {
  .span-@{index} {
    width: @value;
  }
});

Output

.span-1 {
  width: 1%;
}
.span-2 {
  width: 2%;
}
.span-3 {
  width: 3%;
}
.
.
.
.span-98 {
  width: 98%;
}
.span-99 {
  width: 99%;
}
.span-100 {
  width: 100%;
}

Quoting the docs:

Creating a for loop using range and each

Requires Less v3.9.0

You can emulate a for loop simply by generating a numerical list and using each to expand it to a ruleset.

Notes:

  • range(1%, 100%, 1): makes a list starting from 1% to 100%, with step value of 1, that is:

    1% 2% 3% ... 100%

  • each(list, rules): Bind the evaluation of a ruleset to each member of a list.

    • @value: each value in the list, i.e. 1%, 2%, ...
    • @index: index of each value, starting from 1 (numerical position, 1-based)

Original Answer:

Try this:

@iterations: 5;
.span-loop (@i) when (@i > 0) {
    .span-@{i} {
        width: ~"@{i}%";
    }
    .span-loop(@i - 1);
}
.span-loop (@iterations);

Output:

.span-5 {
  width: 5%;
}
.span-4 {
  width: 4%;
}
.span-3 {
  width: 3%;
}
.span-2 {
  width: 2%;
}
.span-1 {
  width: 1%;
}

You can try it out on less2css.

Update, 4/3/2014

Here is a more flexible version with more options:

.custom-loop( @base-value:@n ; @n ; @unit : px; @j : 1 ;@_s:0 ; @step-size:1  ; @selector:~".span-"; @property : width)
when not(@n=0)  {
  
  @size : @base-value+@_s;
  @{selector}@{j}{
    @{property} : ~"@{size}@{unit}";
  }
  .custom-loop(@base-value ,  (@n - 1), @unit , (@j + 1) ,  (@_s+@step-size) , @step-size,  @selector, @property);
}

You can call this by only @n which is the required argument:

.custom-loop(@n:3);

Which will output:

.span-1 {
  width: 3px;
}
.span-2 {
  width: 4px;
}
.span-3 {
  width: 5px;
}

But if you want to have control over each parameter, here is an example using all custom parameters:

.custom-loop( @n: 3 , @base-value:1, @unit: '%', @property:font-size, @selector: ~".fs-", @step-size: 2);

This will output:

.fs-1 {
  font-size: 1%;
}
.fs-2 {
  font-size: 3%;
}
.fs-3 {
  font-size: 5%;
}

Parameter descriptions

  1. @n : integer, The number of iterations.

  2. @base-value (optional): integer, The starting value for the loop to be assigned to the property. Default value is the same is the value assigned for the number of iterations @n.

  3. @unit (optional): string, The unit for the property. Default value is px.

  4. @property (optional): non-string or string The CSS property. Default value is width

  5. @selector (optional): escaped string, The selector used for the loop. Could be anything as long as it is passed in as a escaped string.

  6. @step-size (optional): integer, The value by which the loop increments by.

NOTES

Note 1: The custom selector is passed in as a escaped string. If it is not escaped, it is not going to work as expected.

Note 2: The mixin is called by explicitly using the parameter name. This has some advantages and disadvantages:

Note 3: The unit is passed in as a string.

Advantages

  1. It is clear what parameter is called
  2. You don't have to rely on the order of parameters and remember which parameter comes first, second, …

Disadvantages

  1. I guess it looks a bit ugly ?
  2. (add to the list and/or change the implementation if you know a better one)
3
  • Only this syntax works with less.php (leafo), thanks !
    – nicolast
    Jan 22, 2014 at 15:20
  • One small critique. I prefer @j:@base-value and (@j+@step-size) so that I get meaningful class names instead of an index without context. In your solution, the class name is not matching the value that's set in the property when base-value != step-size != 1. Jun 14, 2021 at 20:47
  • you are god bro
    – myworldbox
    Mar 27, 2022 at 17:36
23

All, I found a way to output css in loop. pleae review it .thanks.

@iterations: 100;

// helper class, will never show up in resulting css
// will be called as long the index is above 0
.loopingClass (@index) when (@index > 0) {

    // create the actual css selector, example will result in
    // .myclass_30, .myclass_28, .... , .myclass_1
    (~".span@{index}") {
        // your resulting css
        width: percentage((@index - 1) *0.01);
    }

    // next iteration
    .loopingClass(@index - 1);
}

// end the loop when index is 0
.loopingClass (0) {}

// "call" the loopingClass the first time with highest value
.loopingClass (@iterations);
4
  • 1
    Please refer to the Less source code of Bootstrap (namely mixins.less). Search for ".spanX" string, I hope that it's next to what you mean to get at.
    – menjaraz
    Apr 5, 2013 at 18:25
  • You use guard along with a recursive mixin as did the authors of Bootstrap.
    – menjaraz
    Apr 8, 2013 at 18:36
  • 3
    Please head to this post: Do a loop with LESS css.
    – menjaraz
    Apr 13, 2013 at 11:08
  • @Joe.wang code was not working in less2css.org. So, I played and got this:` @iterations: 100; .loopingClass (@index) when (@index > 0) { .span@{index} { width: percentage((@index ) *0.01); } .loopingClass(@index - 5); } .loopingClass (0) {} .loopingClass (@iterations);` @iterations: 100; .loopingClass (@index) when (@index > 0) { .span@{index} { width: percentage((@index ) *0.01); } .loopingClass(@index - 5); } .loopingClass (0) {} .loopingClass (@iterations); ` Oct 29, 2013 at 14:07
13

Please note, that since version 3.7 Less has an each() function, which can be easily used with the range() function to produce the wanted code - like this:

each(range(100),{
    .span@{value} { width: @value * 1%; }
});
1

It is impossible to do within given methods.

But possible like this:

.loopingClass (@index) when (@index > 0){
  .span_@{index}{
    width: @index px;
  }
  .loopingClass(@index - 1);
}
.loopingClass(5);

Resilt will be like this:

.span_100 {
  width: 100 px;
}
.span_99 {
  width: 99 px;
}
.span_98 {
  width: 98 px;
}
.span_97 {
  width: 97 px;
}
.span_96 {
  width: 96 px;
}
.span_95 {
  width: 95 px;
}

and e.t.c.
2
  • Please add answer with code or fiddle. picture on code is consider bad answer
    – Miller
    Feb 19, 2014 at 13:10
  • Isn't this answer a duplicate of @Amin answer? Feb 19, 2014 at 17:44

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