When I tried to run

git push origin master --force

I just got

Counting objects: 2649, done.
Delta compression using up to 2 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (1280/1280), done.
error: RPC failed; result=22, HTTP code = 413 | 116 KiB/s   
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly
Writing objects: 100% (2504/2504), 449.61 MiB | 4.19 MiB/s, done.
Total 2504 (delta 1309), reused 2242 (delta 1216)
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly
Everything up-to-date

Is it something to do with not being secure? I tried creating a public key as in the answer for Fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly and running it again, but it still doesn't work. Am I not actually using the key? If so, how do I use it?

  • please show output of git remote -v – CharlesB Mar 6 '13 at 6:59
  • possible duplicate of Git fails when pushing commit to github – CharlesB Mar 6 '13 at 7:01
  • 12
    git config http.postBuffer 524288000 # it works for me – Hari Das Oct 25 '14 at 14:37
  • if you get error: could not lock config file .git/config: No such file or directory see stackoverflow.com/a/32329453/827525 – niksmac Sep 16 '15 at 4:03
  • I could not get any of the suggested solutions to work. Then I tried GitKraken. It is one of the few Git programs that doesn't use git.exe. GitKraken could do it. After GitKraken had pushed the repository I could switch back to git.exe and sync without any issues. – lars pehrsson Feb 26 '17 at 10:53

21 Answers 21

up vote 61 down vote accepted

This looks similar to How do I get github to default to ssh and not https for new repositories. Probably it's worth trying to switch from http protocol to ssh:

$ git remote add origin git@github.com:username/project.git
  • Why can't I just switch from http to https? – DanielLC Mar 7 '13 at 2:58
  • 7
    bash-3.2$ git remote add origin git@github.com:xxx/xx.git fatal: remote origin already exists. WHY ? – almaruf Nov 3 '14 at 10:36
  • 7
    @almaruf it is because the remote origin is already there and you are trying to replace it. git doesn't allow that. So you have to first do git remote rm origin then try again. It would work – Alfie Apr 25 '15 at 11:28
  • make sure you initialise the project if it's a new fresh clone with git init – Raul Jul 21 '16 at 9:29
  • you can use either the git protocol over ssh (which requires ssh keys) or the https protocol which requires username and password through a personal access token – I prefer the later – Raul Jul 21 '16 at 9:30

The problem is due to git/https buffer settings. In order to solve it (taken from Git fails when pushing commit to github)

git config http.postBuffer 524288000

And run the command again

  • 1
    I need the buffer to be higher than 500MB - is that possible? It doesn't seem to make a difference if I make the postBuffer number any higher... – jowie Sep 11 '13 at 13:45
  • 2
    @jowie Have you tried : github.com/gitlabhq/gitlabhq/issues/3099 – Roman M Sep 29 '13 at 8:46
  • Thanks for the link - I sorted the issue by splitting the push into smaller chunks. If I have a problem again I know where to look! – jowie Sep 30 '13 at 8:13
  • your answer solved my issue, thanks!! – Sithu Mar 12 '14 at 11:45
  • 11
    Would it be a good idea to use this with --global? I deal with large repositories regularly. – DaAwesomeP Feb 2 '15 at 20:55

Cause : The default file post size for Git has been exceeded.

Solution :

Navigate to repo.

Run the following command to increase the buffer to 500MB after navigating to the repository:

git config http.postBuffer 524288000
  • 2
    Please format your code using the code tags. Also explain what the code does because this is an old post, make your answer as good as possible. – Dan Grahn Sep 9 '13 at 11:23
  • 17
    You can also use git config ssh.postBuffer 524288000 if posting over ssh instead of http. – John M May 11 '15 at 21:01
  • when I got "fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly" and this command is working for me. – JimiOr2 May 16 at 8:48

You might get an error like this

error: could not lock config file .git/config: No such file or directory

that is because you dont have a local .git/config file You can get it working by this command

git config --global http.postBuffer 524288000

  • this helped me when trying to clone on a very slow PC inside cygwin - it continued to remote end hung up - until I used this command – serup Apr 5 '17 at 21:52
  • This help me to resolve the "fatal: The remote end hung up upon initial contact" issue. – Karthic.K Jun 5 '17 at 4:53

Other solutions didn't work in my case, doing a garbage collection fixed it for me:

git gc --aggressive

  • 11
    This fixed my problem, but it also squashed the detached HEAD changes into a state where merging them became obnoxious (everything was converted to an ADD). I wish I had researched this one more before running it. – MatrixManAtYrService Jul 1 '16 at 3:40

Just to add this (because this was the first entry when I googled):

This error can also be thrown by missing writing access for the repository.

In my case I created the repo with the root account of my server and actually forgot about that later so the git user couldn't write the pushes into the directory.

In our case, the problem was a clone that wrote a .git/config file which contained a url entry that was a read only access method. Changing the url from the :// method to the @ method fixed the problem.

Running git remote -v illuminated the issue some.

You probably did clone the repository within an existing one, to solve the problem can simply clone of the repository in another directory and replicate the changes to this new directory and then run the push.

  • we have a beta ansible workflow and rebuilding the site caused exactly this, cloning the repo on top of the other one. Ansible thing to fix but casing a git problem. Thanks :-) – Alejandro Moreno Mar 24 '16 at 10:33

Contrary to one of the other answers - I had the problem on push using ssh - I switched to https and it was fixed.

git remote remove origin
git remote add origin https://github..com/user/repo
git push --set-upstream origin master

If you are using git for windows (and you likely are, if you are doing this on a windows machine), and none of the other fixes here worked for you, try going to https://github.com/git-for-windows/git/releases, and getting a version on or after version 2.4.5. Fixed it right up for me.

Another addition, since I encountered this error a different way and Google took me here.

My problem was a mismatch of case; one camelCase and one not. Apparently, GIT stops you doing this without telling you why. So if your branches are different from the remote only in the capitalization, try changing them to be identical.

See: Git: 'Master cannot be resolved to branch' after merge

  • I thought I included all relevant info - it's caused by a case mismatch. I've added a sentence to be more explicit, but this isn't really about the link. Sorry if that wasn't clear. – Thomas Dec 3 '15 at 11:08

This may occur after updating your OSX platform.

Open Terminal and navigate to your .ssh-folder, and enter ssh-add -K ~/.ssh/id_rsa

I happened to have the same error at pull.
I have done the "http.postBuffer" trick. It solved it, but when I wanted to push, I encountered the error again.

What solved my problem:
1. Cloned it to an other folder with an other virtual machine. (Linux).
2. I've done my changes.
3. Pushed it with the original virtual machine where I initially couldn't push. (Windows)

  • this is not a solution buddy! – ray pixar Jul 10 '16 at 6:38
  • 2
    I know this is not an ideal solution, but it solved the problem in my case. It can be still lifesaver when all the other answer fails, as they did in my case. – nopara73 Jul 11 '16 at 6:13

I got this error when I had incorrect keypair in .ssh. Adding the pubkey to github (in settings) fixed this issue for me.

I have the same problem. I noticed from the git web page that the SSH clone URL have the next structure:

git@github.com:user/project.git

I could resolve my problem just changing the ":" by "/", as follows:

git@github.com/user/project.git

may be this can be helpful.

Seems like it can be one of a thousand things.

For me, I was initially pushing master and develop (master had no changes) via SourceTree. Changing this to develop only worked.

I got this error when I had misspelt my remote branch name

I was able to get around this issue using Git Shell.

Each repository within github.com gives you HTTPS/SSH/Subversion URL's that you can use to download using Shell, see here: http://prntscr.com/8ydguv.
Based on GitHub's recent changes, SSH seems to be the best method.

Command to use in Shell:

git clone "URL of repo goes here w/ no quotes"
  • What do you mean by "Git Shell"? Using git in a terminal? – Karl Richter Feb 18 '17 at 19:42

Seems almost pointless to add an answer, but I was fighting this for ages when I finally discovered it was Visual Studio Online that was suffering a sporadic outage. That became apparent when VS kept prompting for creds and the VSO website sometimes gave a 500.

Counting objects: 138816, done.
Delta compression using up to 8 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (38049/38049), done.
error: unable to rewind rpc post data - try increasing http.postBuffer
error: RPC failed; curl 56 SSL read: error:00000000:lib(0):func(0):reason(0), errno 10054
The remote end hung up unexpectedly/138816), 33.30 MiB | 3.00 KiB/s
Writing objects: 100% (138816/138816), 50.21 MiB | 3.00 KiB/s, done.
Total 138816 (delta 100197), reused 134574 (delta 96515)
fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly
Everything up-to-date

I set my HTTP post buffer back to 2Mb afterwards, since I actually think it works better with many smaller posts.

Luke

Do this to see the key you're using; ssh -vT git@github.digitalglobe.com

Then make sure in your build you have this run at the start. eval "$(ssh-agent -s)" ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa

1) cd to the project dir

2) git status

3) git checkout -f HEAD

4) confirm success by pulling down master again to make sure you're up to date if your repo looked incomplete

This works if you get the error in question from Visual Studio's Git when cloning a repo from Bitbucket

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