5
#include<stdio.h>
#define macro(a) a=a<<4;
main()
{
 int a=0x59;
 printf("%x",a);
 printf("\n");
 macro(a)
 printf("%x",a);            
}

For the above code , i am getting the below output:

59 590

And now my question is why i am not getting the below output as left shift operation:

59 90

  • 1
    So could you please tell me what should i do so as to get the output as 90..i need to shift the last 4 bits to the first 4 bits adding 0's at the end. – rvp Mar 6 '13 at 9:00
  • 1
    Try changing a to unsigned char instead of int if you want it to be just 2 hexadecimal numbers. – Klas Lindbäck Mar 6 '13 at 9:00
  • 90 in base 16 or 10? – user1944441 Mar 6 '13 at 9:00
  • Left shift by 4 is equivalent to multiplying the number by 2, 4 times. That is, 59 * 2 * 2 * 2 * 2 = 590 (base 16). Your output is correct. – Anish Ramaswamy Mar 6 '13 at 9:02
  • #define macro(a) a=a<<4; <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EVIL SEMICOLON. I tried writing a macro for doing that, but failed. Why not just used a <<= 4? – Dmitry Mar 6 '13 at 9:07
8

Left shifts does NOT truncate the number to fit the length of the original one. To get 90, use:

(a<<4) & 0xff

0x59 is an int and probably on your platform it has sizeof(int)==4. Then it's a 0x00000059. Left shifting it by 4 gives 0x00000590.

Also, form a good habit of using unsigned int types when dealing with bitwise operators, unless you know what you are doing. They have different behaviours in situations like a right shift.

  • Thanks a lot ! :) – rvp Mar 6 '13 at 9:13
6

You shifted a hexadecimal number by 4 places to left so you get 590, which is correct.

you had

000001011001    

shifted to left by 4 bits

010110010000

is 590 in hex

10010000

is 90 in hex so you might want to remove 0101 as is shown by phoeagon

4

In your printf if you change %x to %d you get a =89 and after left shifting you will get a = 1424

Generally for decimal (base 10) numbers

a = a<< n  is  a = a*2^n
a = a>> n  is  a = a/2^n

For Hexadecimal (base 16) numbers ,

Any shift by n (left or right) , can be considered , as a corresponding shift of the digits of the binary equivalent. But this depends on sizeof(int) , used for a given compiler.

1

You are using int so you have :

 000001011001  

If you shift it by 4 to the left you get :

010110010000

If you only want to have only the first 8 bits you don't have to use "int" but unsigned char (or char)

#include<stdio.h>
#define macro(a) a=a<<4;
main()
{
   unsigned char a=0x59;
   printf("%x",a);
   printf("\n");
   macro(a)
   printf("%x",a);            
}

if you still want to use int but only keep the first 8 bits you can use a mask :

#define macro(a) a=(a<<4) & 0xFF
  • 1
    #define macro(a) a=(a<<4) & 0xFF; <<<< evil semicolon, please kill it with fire. I dont think that macro would work even if you tried. I tried, it didnt work. :| – Dmitry Mar 6 '13 at 9:11
  • My mistake. Sure you can't !!!!! (I guess everyone has done this mistake on time :D) – Joze Mar 6 '13 at 9:14
-1

So could you please tell me what should i do so as to get the output as 90..i need to shift the last 4 bits to the first 4 bits adding 0's at the end

The only way you can shift the 4 last bit 4 bit to the left AND get it in the place of the first 4 bit is if your type have just 8 bit. Usually this is the case of unsigned char, not int. You expect 90 for

unsigned char a=0x59;
macro(a)

but for int is 590 The error is not with the use of the << is with the selection of the type. (or a missuse of macro?)

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