88

How do you underline html text so that the line beneath the text is dotted rather than the standard underline? Preferably, I would like to do this without using a separate CSS file. I'm a novice at html.

  • 12
    Why why can you not use CSS? Maybe create the page as one image and add the line with mspaint? – epascarello Mar 6 '13 at 16:20
  • I don't think it can be done without CSS – Cfreak Mar 6 '13 at 16:21
  • You have to use css, but it could be done using background images, border bottom is the best approach – kingdomcreation Mar 6 '13 at 16:22
  • 4
    Dudes. I think he said "without using a separate CSS file", not "without CSS". Worship the newbies. – Stefan Reich May 29 '17 at 13:38
133

It's impossible without CSS. In fact, the <u> tag is simply adding text-decoration:underline to the text with the browser's built-in CSS.

Here's what you can do:

<html>
<head>
<!-- Other head stuff here, like title or meta -->

<style type="text/css">
u {    
    border-bottom: 1px dotted #000;
    text-decoration: none;
}
</style>
</head>
<!-- Body, content here -->
</html>
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19

Use the following CSS codes...

text-decoration:underline;
text-decoration-style: dotted;
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  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer. Following the box model, using a dotted border will be placed outside of padding and will thus be distant from the text. – Ryan Walker Mar 25 at 22:38
15

Without CSS, you basically are stuck with using an image tag. Basically make an image of the text and add the underline. That basically means your page is useless to a screen reader.

With CSS, it is simple.

HTML:

<u class="dotted">I like cheese</u>

CSS:

u.dotted{
  border-bottom: 1px dashed #999;
  text-decoration: none; 
}

Running Example

Example page

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
    <style>
        u.dotted{
          border-bottom: 1px dashed #999;
          text-decoration: none; 
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <u class="dotted">I like cheese</u>
</body>
</html>
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7

HTML5 element can give dotted underline so the beneath text will have dotted line rather than regular underline. And the title attribute creates a tool tip for the user when they hover their cursor over the element:

NOTE: The dotted border/underline is shown by default in Firefox and Opera, but IE8, Safari, and Chrome need a line of CSS:

<abbr title="Hyper Text Markup Language">HTML</abbr>
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  • This is the correct answer. Short and CSS-free. Thanks. – Saeed Ahadian Jan 14 at 13:36
4

If the content has more than 1 line, adding a bottom border won't help. In that case you'll have to use,

text-decoration: underline;
text-decoration-style: dotted;

If you want more breathing space in between the text and the line, simply use,

text-underline-position: under;
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3

Reformatted the answer by @epascarello:

u.dotted {
  border-bottom: 1px dashed #999;
  text-decoration: none;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<u class="dotted">I like cheese</u>

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0

You can use border bottom with dotted option.

border-bottom: 1px dotted #807f80;
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0

You can try this method:

<h2 style="text-decoration: underline; text-underline-position: under; text-decoration-style: dotted">Hello World!</h2>

Please note that without text-underline-position: under; you still will have a dotted underline but this property will give it more breathing space.

This is assuming you want to embed everything inside an HTML file using inline styling and not to use a separate CSS file or tag.

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-2

It's not impossible without CSS. For example as a list item:

<li style="border-bottom: 1px dashed"><!--content --></li>
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  • 6
    It is impossible without CSS. The style attribute is simply a way of applying CSS properties directly to an element. See the MDN docs on the style attribute. – mirichan Sep 1 '15 at 7:31
  • Adding CSS in this way is a way of effectively thinking about html styling. Of course you can argue there's no such thing but for an easy to describe method this is a possible solution. – Davington III Sep 18 '15 at 14:58
  • It's still CSS though, and the real preference given was to not have a separate file. The best way to go about solving the problem with that restriction is <style>. Inline styles should be used pretty sparingly. – mirichan Sep 18 '15 at 15:46
  • Well at the time I created that post it was because I had to use inline styles. It seemed worthwhile noting that possibility to others imo just incase they might not have thought of it, It's not really an appropriate topic for war & peace... They presumably found what they needed and our suggestions are there for those and any others that might need them, when I post from work I don't take into account someone pointing out something already obvious about the suggestion when it is a suggestion not a "you must do it this way" so yeah take a chill pill bro :) – Davington III Sep 21 '15 at 13:18
  • 1
    You mistake my intentions. I was making a technical observation relevant to the question asked. I had no intention of calling you out, and I apologise for it coming across that way. – mirichan Sep 21 '15 at 13:41

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