74

Is there any algorithm to compute the nth fibonacci number in sub linear time?

  • 4
    One could argue that it's related to algorithms, since the OP makes a vague reference to algorithmic complexity... I'd still be curious what algorithm though. – Matthew Scharley Oct 6 '09 at 13:24
  • 2
    The two answers below have the correct formula. On whether this question is programming-related: it's part of computer science. The apparatus used to derive the formula is known as "generating functions" and has an important role in algorithm analysis. – azheglov Oct 6 '09 at 13:37
  • 1
    @azheglov: While generating functions are useful, they are not needed to derive the closed-form expression for the Fibonacci sequence. – jason Oct 6 '09 at 14:37
  • 6
    You have a problem that you want to solve for whatever reason, and you want to do it efficiently. Sometimes the required insight will be a new implementation, sometime an algorithm, and sometimes mathematics. There is no need to decry the situation as "not programming related" every time the latter happens. – ShreevatsaR Oct 6 '09 at 15:39
  • 6
    The size of the result is linear in n. Therefore there is no such algorithm. Of course that doesn't invalidate any of the nice answers below that compute Fibonacci numbers using O(log n) arithmetic operations. – Accipitridae Oct 6 '09 at 17:06

14 Answers 14

64

The nth Fibonacci number is given by

f(n) = Floor(phi^n / sqrt(5) + 1/2) 

where

phi = (1 + sqrt(5)) / 2

Assuming that the primitive mathematical operations (+, -, * and /) are O(1) you can use this result to compute the nth Fibonacci number in O(log n) time (O(log n) because of the exponentiation in the formula).

In C#:

static double inverseSqrt5 = 1 / Math.Sqrt(5);
static double phi = (1 + Math.Sqrt(5)) / 2;
/* should use 
   const double inverseSqrt5 = 0.44721359549995793928183473374626
   const double phi = 1.6180339887498948482045868343656
*/

static int Fibonacci(int n) {
    return (int)Math.Floor(Math.Pow(phi, n) * inverseSqrt5 + 0.5);
}
  • 6
    @Json I have not downvoted you, but others may be doing so because your answer suggests that the Nth fibonacci number can be computed in O(log n) time, which is false. Your code is computing an approximation. Your code would be at least O(n) in arbitrary precision, because the length of the answer is O(n). – PeterAllenWebb Oct 13 '09 at 18:52
  • 9
    @PeterAllenWebb: The formula provided is not an approximation. The nth Fibonacci number is equal to the floor of phi^n / sqrt(5) + 1/2 where phi = (1 + sqrt(5)) / 2. This is a fact. Second, I understand the point that others are making about the length of the answer being O(n) but I have added a remark to my answer assuming that the primitive mathematical operations take constant time (I know they are not unless you bound the inputs). My point is that we can find the nth Fibonacci number in O(log n) arithmetic operations. – jason Oct 13 '09 at 19:28
  • 4
    @Jason: Assuming that exponentiation is O(1) too makes the whole algorithm O(1). That would be nice, however, exponentiation is not O(1) and neither are the other primitive mathematical operations. So in short, the formula is nice, but it doesn't calculate the result in sub-linear time. – yairchu Oct 13 '09 at 20:36
  • 10
    @Jason: The formula is not an approximation, but the code is an approximation (except on an imaginary C# implementation in which Math.Pow(…) has infinite precision, in which case the code is O(n)). – ShreevatsaR Oct 24 '11 at 3:07
  • 13
    @Jason: Nope. Run your code on n=1000 (for which the Fibonacci number 43466...849228875 has a measly 209 digits) and tell me if you get all digits right. For Math.Floor to get the integer part right, those many digits have to be accurately calculated by Math.Pow. In fact, on my C++ implementation, even the 16-digit F_{74} = 130496954492865 is calculated incorrectly, even though the integer 130496954492865 can be represented exactly (with long long), and I'd be surprised if C# gets much more digits than that. – ShreevatsaR Oct 24 '11 at 9:57
98

Following from Pillsy's reference to matrix exponentiation, such that for the matrix

M = [1 1] 
    [1 0] 

then

fib(n) = Mn1,2

Raising matrices to powers using repeated multiplication is not very efficient.

Two approaches to matrix exponentiation are divide and conquer which yields Mn in O(ln n) steps, or eigenvalue decomposition which is constant time, but may introduce errors due to limited floating point precision.

If you want an exact value greater than the precision of your floating point implementation, you have to use the O ( ln n ) approach based on this relation:

Mn = (Mn/2)2 if n even
   = M·Mn-1 if n is odd

The eigenvalue decomposition on M finds two matrices U and Λ such that Λ is diagonal and

 M  = U Λ U-1 
 Mn = ( U Λ U-1) n
    = U Λ U-1 U Λ U-1 U Λ U-1 ... n times
    = U Λ Λ Λ ... U-1 
    = U Λ n U-1 
Raising a the diagonal matrix Λ to the nth power is a simple matter of raising each element in Λ to the nth, so this gives an O(1) method of raising M to the nth power. However, the values in Λ are not likely to be integers, so some error will occur.

Defining Λ for our 2x2 matrix as

Λ = [ λ1 0 ]
  = [ 0 λ2 ]

To find each λ, we solve

 |M - λI| = 0

which gives

 |M - λI| = -λ ( 1 - λ ) - 1

λ² - λ - 1 = 0

using the quadratic formula

λ    = ( -b ± √ ( b² - 4ac ) ) / 2a
     = ( 1 ± √5 ) / 2
 { λ1, λ2 } = { Φ, 1-Φ } where Φ = ( 1 + √5 ) / 2

If you've read Jason's answer, you can see where this is going to go.

Solving for the eigenvectors X1 and X2:

if X1 = [ X1,1, X1,2 ]

 M.X1 1 = λ1X1

 X1,1 + X1,2 = λ1 X1,1
 X1,1      = λ1 X1,2

=>
 X1 = [ Φ,   1 ]
 X2 = [ 1-Φ, 1 ]

These vectors give U:

U = [ X1,1, X2,2 ]
    [ X1,1, X2,2 ]

  = [ Φ,   1-Φ ]
    [ 1,   1   ]

Inverting U using

A   = [  a   b ]
      [  c   d ]
=>
A-1 = ( 1 / |A| )  [  d  -b ]
                   [ -c   a ]

so U-1 is given by

U-1 = ( 1 / ( Φ - ( 1 - Φ ) )  [  1  Φ-1 ]
                               [ -1   Φ  ]
U-1 = ( √5 )-1  [  1  Φ-1 ]
               [ -1   Φ  ]

Sanity check:

UΛU-1 = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   1-Φ ] . [ Φ   0 ] . [ 1  Φ-1 ] 
                     [ 1   1  ]   [ 0  1-Φ ]   [ -1   Φ ]

let Ψ = 1-Φ, the other eigenvalue

as Φ is a root of λ²-λ-1=0 
so  -ΨΦ = Φ²-Φ = 1
and Ψ+Φ = 1

UΛU-1 = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   Ψ ] . [ Φ   0 ] . [  1  -Ψ ] 
                 [ 1   1 ]   [ 0   Ψ ]   [ -1   Φ ]

       = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   Ψ ] . [ Φ   -ΨΦ ] 
                 [ 1   1 ]   [ -Ψ  ΨΦ ]

       = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   Ψ ] . [ Φ    1 ] 
                 [ 1   1 ]   [ -Ψ  -1 ]

       = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ²-Ψ²  Φ-Ψ ] 
                  [ Φ-Ψ      0 ]

       = [ Φ+Ψ   1 ]    
         [ 1     0 ]

       = [ 1     1 ] 
         [ 1     0 ]

       = M 

So the sanity check holds.

Now we have everything we need to calculate Mn1,2:

Mn = UΛnU-1
   = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   Ψ ] . [ Φn  0 ] . [  1  -Ψ ] 
              [ 1   1 ]   [ 0   Ψn ]   [ -1   Φ ]

   = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   Ψ ] . [  Φn  -ΨΦn ] 
              [ 1   1 ]   [ -Ψn   ΨnΦ ]

   = ( √5 )-1 [ Φ   Ψ ] . [  Φn   Φn-1 ] 
              [ 1   1 ]   [ -Ψnn-1 ] as ΨΦ = -1

   = ( √5 )-1 [ Φn+1n+1      Φnn ]
              [ Φnn      Φn-1n-1 ]

so

 fib(n) = Mn1,2
        = ( Φn - (1-Φ)n ) / √5

Which agrees with the formula given elsewhere.

You can derive it from a recurrance relation, but in engineering computing and simulation calculating the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large matrices is an important activity, as it gives stability and harmonics of systems of equations, as well as allowing raising matrices to high powers efficiently.

  • +1 - Awesome stuff, as usual. What did you use to typeset it? LaTeX? – duffymo Oct 9 '09 at 0:44
  • 49
    no, just patience and a text editor – Pete Kirkham Oct 9 '09 at 8:00
  • It is copy-pasted from the book of Algebra of Gilbert Strang, or from other good book of Linear Algebra. – alinsoar Aug 20 '14 at 19:33
  • 1
    @alinsoar it was not 'copy pasted', but done as an exercise to check I could still remember my lin a, with some reference to Open University course notes and wikipedia. – Pete Kirkham Aug 21 '14 at 8:19
  • I took the course of L Algebra with Gilbert Strang, and there it was identical. Quite so, the problem of expressing recursion via matrix decomposition is classical, and can be found in any good text book / course. – alinsoar Aug 21 '14 at 8:31
54

If you want the exact number (which is a "bignum", rather than an int/float), then I'm afraid that

It's impossible!

As stated above, the formula for Fibonacci numbers is:

fib n = floor (phin/√5 + 1/2)

fib n ~= phin/√5

How many digits is fib n?

numDigits (fib n) = log (fib n) = log (phin/√5) = log phin - log √5 = n * log phi - log √5

numDigits (fib n) = n * const + const

it's O(n)

Since the requested result is of O(n), it can't be calculated in less than O(n) time.

If you only want the lower digits of the answer, then it is possible to calculate in sub-linear time using the matrix exponentiation method.

  • 17
    This is the only fully correct answer that has been posted. – PeterAllenWebb Oct 13 '09 at 18:49
  • 2
    @yairchu: Let me rephrase this, if I understand it correctly. In theory calculating fib_n requires calculating n digits so for any arbitrary n it will take O(n) time. However, if fib_n < sizeof(long long) then we can calculate fib_n in O(log n) time since the machine architecture is providing a parallel mechanism of setting the bits. (For example, int i = -1; requires setting 32-bits but on a 32-bit machine all the 32 bits can be set in constant time. – Sumit Aug 20 '12 at 0:02
  • 6
    @Sumit: If you only want to support results that fit in 32-bits, then you can also have a lookup table for these first 48 results of the series. That's obviously O(1), but: Doing big-O analysis for a bounded N is silly, as you can always incorporate anything into the constant factor. So my answer refers to unbounded input. – yairchu Aug 22 '12 at 12:31
  • 1
    @yairchu: Could you demonstrate your logic for a well-known example such as O(n*log n) for comparison-based sorting of a sequence of n numbers where each number has O(log n) digits? – jfs Oct 19 '14 at 19:32
  • 4
    Integers will indeed have a finite representation in base sqrt(2), but it will just be zero on odd digits, i.e. equivalent to base 2. If any of the odd digits in base sqrt(2) is nonzero, you have an irrational number. One case where you may want base phi is in ADCs when converting continuous signals to analog. Afaik this is the "industrial" application of base phi, where it is used to reduce coarse graining when rounding the signal. Personally though, I used base phi and fibonacci encodings as a notationally convenient way to work with Fibonacci anyon representations of the braid group. – saolof Jun 5 '17 at 23:02
33

One of the exercises in SICP is about this, which has the answer described here.

In the imperative style, the program would look something like

Function Fib(count)
    a ← 1
    b ← 0
    p ← 0
    q ← 1

    While count > 0 Do
        If Even(count) Then
             pp² + q²
             q ← 2pq + q²
             countcount ÷ 2
        Else
             abq + aq + ap
             bbp + aq
             countcount - 1
        End If
    End While

    Return b
End Function
24

You can do it by exponentiating a matrix of integers as well. If you have the matrix

    / 1  1 \
M = |      |
    \ 1  0 /

then (M^n)[1, 2] is going to be equal to the nth Fibonacci number, if [] is a matrix subscript and ^ is matrix exponentiation. For a fixed-size matrix, exponentiation to an positive integral power can be done in O(log n) time in the same way as with real numbers.

EDIT: Of course, depending on the type of answer you want, you may be able to get away with a constant-time algorithm. Like the other formulas show, the nth Fibonacci number grows exponentially with n. Even with 64-bit unsigned integers, you'll only need a 94-entry lookup table in order to cover the entire range.

SECOND EDIT: Doing the matrix exponential with an eigendecomposition first is exactly equivalent to JDunkerly's solution below. The eigenvalues of this matrix are the (1 + sqrt(5))/2 and (1 - sqrt(5))/2.

  • 3
    Use the eigen decomposition of M to calculate M^n efficiently. – Pete Kirkham Oct 6 '09 at 14:25
  • 1
    Proposed method is fine for calculations in integers (probably with long arithmetic). Approach with eigen decomposition is not interesting: if you don't need integer calculations, then use formula from Jason's answer. – Konstantin Tenzin Oct 6 '09 at 14:56
  • 1
    @Konstantin The formula from Jason's answer is the result given by eigen decomposition, so you're contradicting yourself. – Pete Kirkham Oct 7 '09 at 7:57
  • @Pete Kirkham That formula can be obtained by several methods: characteristics equation, eigen decomposition, proof by induction. I'm not sure, that eigen decomposition is the easiest one. In any case it is well-known, and it is easier to use it immediately – Konstantin Tenzin Oct 7 '09 at 9:20
5

Wikipedia has a closed form solution http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number

Or in c#:

    public static int Fibonacci(int N)
    {
        double sqrt5 = Math.Sqrt(5);
        double phi = (1 + sqrt5) / 2.0;
        double fn = (Math.Pow(phi, N) - Math.Pow(1 - phi, N)) / sqrt5;
        return (int)fn;
    }
  • 2
    You can avoid the need to compute to two exponentials by using the fact that |1 - phi|^n / sqrt(5) < 1/2 when n is a nonnegative integer. – jason Oct 6 '09 at 13:28
  • Didn't know that adjustment always have used the other form, but that is a nice optimisation – JDunkerley Oct 6 '09 at 13:32
  • 1
    Approximation of the result the correct solution involves matrix multiplication. – cerkiewny Aug 19 '14 at 14:52
3

For really big ones, this recursive function works. It uses the following equations:

F(2n-1) = F(n-1)^2 + F(n)^2
F(2n) = (2*F(n-1) + F(n)) * F(n)

You need a library that lets you work with big integers. I use the BigInteger library from https://mattmccutchen.net/bigint/.

Start with an array of of fibonacci numbers. Use fibs[0]=0, fibs[1]=1, fibs[2]=1, fibs[3]=2, fibs[4]=3, etc. In this example, I use an array of the first 501 (counting 0). You can find the first 500 non-zero Fibonacci numbers here: http://home.hiwaay.net/~jalison/Fib500.html. It takes a little editing to put it in the right format, but that is not too hard.

Then you can find any Fibonacci number using this function (in C):

BigUnsigned GetFib(int numfib)
{
int n;
BigUnsigned x, y, fib;  

if (numfib < 501) // Just get the Fibonacci number from the fibs array
    {
       fib=(stringToBigUnsigned(fibs[numfib]));
    }
else if (numfib%2) // numfib is odd
    {
       n=(numfib+1)/2;
       x=GetFib(n-1);
       y=GetFib(n);
       fib=((x*x)+(y*y));
    }
else // numfib is even
    {
       n=numfib/2;
       x=GetFib(n-1);
       y=GetFib(n);
       fib=(((big2*x)+y)*y);
   }
return(fib);
}

I've tested this for the 25,000th Fibonacci number and the like.

  • Oops, forgot to mention that "big2" is a BigUnsigned variable with value 2... – user3137939 Dec 26 '13 at 22:46
  • This code isn't so efficient. Imagine that the fibs[] array is only size 10 and you call Fib(101). Fib(101) calls Fib(51) and Fib(50). Fib(51) calls Fib(26) and Fib(25). Fib(50) calls Fib(25) and Fib(24). So Fib(25) was called twice, which is a waste. Even with fibs up to 500, you will have the same problem with Fib(100000). – Eyal Jun 10 '14 at 13:41
3

Here's my recursive version that recurses log(n) times. I think that it's easiest to read in the recursive form:

def my_fib(x):
  if x < 2:
    return x
  else:
    return my_fib_helper(x)[0]

def my_fib_helper(x):
  if x == 1:
    return (1, 0)
  if x % 2 == 1:
    (p,q) = my_fib_helper(x-1)
    return (p+q,p)
  else:
    (p,q) = my_fib_helper(x/2)
    return (p*p+2*p*q,p*p+q*q)

It works because you can compute fib(n),fib(n-1) using fib(n-1),fib(n-2) if n is odd and if n is even, you can compute fib(n),fib(n-1) using fib(n/2),fib(n/2-1).

The base case and the odd case are simple. To derive the even case, start with a,b,c as consecutive fibonacci values (eg, 8,5,3) and write them in a matrix, with a = b+c. Notice:

[1 1] * [a b]  =  [a+b a]
[1 0]   [b c]     [a   b]

From that, we see that a matrix of the first three fibonacci numbers, times a matrix of any three consecutive fibonacci numbers, equals the next. So we know that:

      n
[1 1]   =  [fib(n+1) fib(n)  ]
[1 0]      [fib(n)   fib(n-1)]

So:

      2n                        2
[1 1]    =  [fib(n+1) fib(n)  ]
[1 0]       [fib(n)   fib(n-1)]

Simplifying the right hand side leads to the even case.

  • I want to stress here that you want to compute F(2n) and F(2n+1) in function of F(n) and F(n-1). You did not indicate what you want to do. – alinsoar Aug 21 '14 at 8:33
1

using R

l1 <- (1+sqrt(5))/2
l2 <- (1-sqrt(5))/2

P <- matrix(c(0,1,1,0),nrow=2) #permutation matrix
S <- matrix(c(l1,1,l2,1),nrow=2)
L <- matrix(c(l1,0,0,l2),nrow=2)
C <- c(-1/(l2-l1),1/(l2-l1))

k<-20 ; (S %*% L^k %*% C)[2]
[1] 6765
1

Apart from fine-tuning by mathematical approaches, one of the best optimum solution (I believe) is using a dictionary in order to avoid repetitive calculations.

import time

_dict = {1:1, 2:1}

def F(n, _dict):
    if n in _dict.keys():
        return _dict[n]
    else:
        result = F(n-1, _dict) + F(n-2, _dict)
        _dict.update({n:result})
        return result

start = time.time()

for n in range(1,100000):
    result = F(n, _dict) 

finish = time.time()

print(str(finish - start))

We start with trivial dictionary (first two values of Fibonacci sequence) and constantly adding Fibonacci values to the dictionary.

It took about 0.7 seconds for the first 100000 Fibonacci values (Intel Xeon CPU E5-2680 @ 2.70 GHz, 16 GB RAM, Windows 10-64 bit OS)

  • This is in linear time though, the question specifically asks how to achieve sublinear time (which is possible using a sort of closed-form solution). – Romeo Valentin Jul 21 at 12:24
0

see divide and conquer algorithm here

The link has pseudocode for the matrix exponentiation mentioned in some of the other answers for this question.

0

Fixed point arithmetic is inaccurate. Jason's C# code gives incorrect answer for n = 71 (308061521170130 instead of 308061521170129) and beyond.

For correct answer, use a computational algebra system. Sympy is such a library for Python. There's an interactive console at http://live.sympy.org/ . Copy and paste this function

phi = (1 + sqrt(5)) / 2
def f(n):
    return floor(phi**n / sqrt(5) + 1/2)

Then calculate

>>> f(10)
55

>>> f(71)
308061521170129

You might like to try inspecting phi.

0

You can use the weird square rooty equation to get an exact answer. The reason is that the $\sqrt(5)$ falls out at the end, you just have to keep track of the coefficients with your own multiplication format.

def rootiply(a1,b1,a2,b2,c):
    ''' multipy a1+b1*sqrt(c) and a2+b2*sqrt(c)... return a,b'''
    return a1*a2 + b1*b2*c, a1*b2 + a2*b1

def rootipower(a,b,c,n):
    ''' raise a + b * sqrt(c) to the nth power... returns the new a,b and c of the result in the same format'''
    ar,br = 1,0
    while n != 0:
        if n%2:
            ar,br = rootiply(ar,br,a,b,c)
        a,b = rootiply(a,b,a,b,c)
        n /= 2
    return ar,br

def fib(k):
    ''' the kth fibonacci number'''
    a1,b1 = rootipower(1,1,5,k)
    a2,b2 = rootipower(1,-1,5,k)
    a = a1-a2
    b = b1-b2
    a,b = rootiply(0,1,a,b,5)
    # b should be 0!
    assert b == 0
    return a/2**k/5

if __name__ == "__main__":
    assert rootipower(1,2,3,3) == (37,30) # 1+2sqrt(3) **3 => 13 + 4sqrt(3) => 39 + 30sqrt(3)
    assert fib(10)==55
0

Here's a one-liner that computes F(n), using integers of size O(n), in O(log n) arithmetic operations:

for i in range(1, 50):
    print(i, pow(2<<i, i, (4<<2*i)-(2<<i)-1)//(2<<i))

Using integers of size O(n) is reasonable, since that's comparable to size of the answer.

To understand this, let phi be the golden ratio (the largest solution to x^2=x+1) and F(n) be the n'th Fibonacci number, where F(0)=0, F(1)=F(2)=1

Now, phi^n = F(n-1) + F(n)phi.

Proof by induction: phi^1 = 0 + 1*phi = F(0) + F(1)phi. And if phi^n = F(n-1) + F(n)phi, then phi^(n+1) = F(n-1)phi + F(n)phi^2 = F(n-1)phi + F(n)(phi+1) = F(n) + (F(n)+F(n-1))phi = F(n) + F(n+1)phi. The only tricky step in this calculation is the one that replaces phi^2 by (1+phi), which follows because phi is the golden ratio.

Also numbers of the form (a+b*phi), where a, b are integers are closed under multiplication.

Proof: (p0+p1*phi)(q0+q1*phi) = p0q0 + (p0q1+q1p0)phi + p1q1*phi^2 = p0q0 + (p0q1+q1p0)phi + p1q1*(phi+1) = (p0q0+p1q1) + (p0q1+q1p0+p1q1)*phi.

Using this representation, one can compute phi^n in O(log n) integer operations using exponentiation by squaring. The result will be F(n-1)+F(n)phi, from which one can read off the n'th Fibonacci number.

def mul(p, q):
    return p[0]*q[0]+p[1]*q[1], p[0]*q[1]+p[1]*q[0]+p[1]*q[1]

def pow(p, n):
    r=1,0
    while n:
        if n&1: r=mul(r, p)
        p=mul(p, p)
        n=n>>1
    return r

for i in range(1, 50):
    print(i, pow((0, 1), i)[1])

Note that the majority of this code is a standard exponentiation-by-squaring function.

To get to the one-liner that starts this answer, one can note that representing phi by a large enough integer X, one can perform (a+b*phi)(c+d*phi) as the integer operation (a+bX)(c+dX) modulo (X^2-X-1). Then the pow function can be replaced by the standard Python pow function (which conveniently includes a third argument z which calculates the result modulo z. The X chosen is 2<<i.

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