24

I just recently made the switch from R to python and have been having some trouble getting used to data frames again as opposed to using R's data.table. The problem I've been having is that I'd like to take a list of strings, check for a value, then sum the count of that string- broken down by user. So I would like to take this data:

   A_id       B    C
1:   a1    "up"  100
2:   a2  "down"  102
3:   a3    "up"  100
3:   a3    "up"  250
4:   a4  "left"  100
5:   a5 "right"  102

And return:

   A_id_grouped   sum_up   sum_down  ...  over_200_up
1:           a1        1          0  ...            0
2:           a2        0          1                 0
3:           a3        2          0  ...            1
4:           a4        0          0                 0
5:           a5        0          0  ...            0

Before I did it with the R code (using data.table)

>DT[ ,list(A_id_grouped, sum_up = sum(B == "up"),
+  sum_down = sum(B == "down"), 
+  ...,
+  over_200_up = sum(up == "up" & < 200), by=list(A)];

However all of my recent attempts with Python have failed me:

DT.agg({"D": [np.sum(DT[DT["B"]=="up"]),np.sum(DT[DT["B"]=="up"])], ...
    "C": np.sum(DT[(DT["B"]=="up") & (DT["C"]>200)])
    })

Thank you in advance! it seems like a simple question however I couldn't find it anywhere.

4 Answers 4

28

To complement unutbu's answer, here's an approach using apply on the groupby object.

>>> df.groupby('A_id').apply(lambda x: pd.Series(dict(
    sum_up=(x.B == 'up').sum(),
    sum_down=(x.B == 'down').sum(),
    over_200_up=((x.B == 'up') & (x.C > 200)).sum()
)))
      over_200_up  sum_down  sum_up
A_id                               
a1              0         0       1
a2              0         1       0
a3              1         0       2
a4              0         0       0
a5              0         0       0
14

There might be a better way; I'm pretty new to pandas, but this works:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

df = pd.DataFrame({'A_id':'a1 a2 a3 a3 a4 a5'.split(),
                   'B': 'up down up up left right'.split(),
                   'C': [100, 102, 100, 250, 100, 102]})

df['D'] = (df['B']=='up') & (df['C'] > 200)
grouped = df.groupby(['A_id'])

def sum_up(grp):
    return np.sum(grp=='up')
def sum_down(grp):
    return np.sum(grp=='down')
def over_200_up(grp):
    return np.sum(grp)

result = grouped.agg({'B': [sum_up, sum_down],
                      'D': [over_200_up]})
result.columns = [col[1] for col in result.columns]
print(result)

yields

      sum_up  sum_down  over_200_up
A_id                               
a1         1         0            0
a2         0         1            0
a3         2         0            1
a4         0         0            0
a5         0         0            0
3

An old question; I feel a better way, and avoiding the apply, would be to create a new dataframe, before grouping and aggregating:


df = df.set_index('A_id')

outcome = {'sum_up' : df.B.eq('up'),
           'sum_down': df.B.eq('down'),
           'over_200_up' : df.B.eq('up') & df.C.gt(200)}

outcome = pd.DataFrame(outcome).groupby(level=0).sum()

outcome
 
      sum_up  sum_down  over_200_up
A_id                               
a1         1         0            0
a2         0         1            0
a3         2         0            1
a4         0         0            0
a5         0         0            0

Another option would be to unstack before grouping; however, I feel it is a longer, unnecessary process:

(df
  .set_index(['A_id', 'B'], append = True)
  .C
  .unstack('B')
  .assign(gt_200 = lambda df: df.up.gt(200))
  .groupby(level='A_id')
  .agg(sum_up=('up', 'count'), 
       sum_down =('down', 'count'), 
       over_200_up = ('gt_200', 'sum')
      )
)

      sum_up  sum_down  over_200_up
A_id                               
a1         1         0            0
a2         0         1            0
a3         2         0            1
a4         0         0            0
a5         0         0            0
1
  • 1
    nice! I haven't done extensive data munging but I stumbled across your answer again and it is definitely much cleaner. I've updated this to be the accepted answer! It would be cool if you added a small comment on how apply is going to save some memory if folks have a very large dataframe (as I did, back in the day), but this should definitely be the first attempt for anyone coming to this question.
    – stites
    Dec 20, 2023 at 2:46
1

Here, what I have recently learned using df assign and numpy's where method:

df3=

A_id       B    C
1:   a1    "up"  100
2:   a2  "down"  102
3:   a3    "up"  100
3:   a3    "up"  250
4:   a4  "left"  100
5:   a5 "right"  102
df3.assign(sum_up= np.where(df3['B']=='up',1,0),sum_down= np.where(df3['B']=='down',1,0),
          over_200_up= np.where((df3['B']=='up') & (df3['C']>200),1,0)).groupby('A_id',as_index=False).agg({'sum_up':sum,'sum_down':sum,'over_200_up':sum})

outcome=

   A_id  sum_up   sum_down  over_200_up
0   a1    1        0         0
1   a2    0        1         0
2   a3    2        0         1
3   a4    0        0         0
4   a5    0        0         0

This also resembles with if you are familiar with SQL case and want to apply the same logic in pandas

select a,
       sum(case when B='up' then 1 else 0 end) as sum_up
       ....
from   table
group by a
1
  • You do not need np.where as the comparison returns booleans, which are 1s and 0s
    – sammywemmy
    Dec 5, 2021 at 10:28

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