2

I am trying to create a CSV file for a file share that has deep folder structure.

I want the CSV to look like:

filename, filepath, file type, folderStructure

So far I have the following:

#Get-ChildItem -Path D:\ -Recurse
$directory="d:\"
gci $directory -recurse |
where {$_.psiscontainer} |
foreach {
    get-childitem $_.fullname |
    sort creationtime |
    select -expand fullname -last 1
}
2
  • Can you fake what you want the output to look like? For example: image.png, D:\images, .png, D:\images lister.csv, D:\images\Lists\, .csv, D:\images\Lists Mar 7, 2013 at 1:05
  • I understand, but can you make some data(Fake is OK for format) so I confirm what you want? Especially the folderstructure. Do you want something like D:\ +images ++image1.jpg +lists ++Exports +++export1.xlsx +++Export4.csv Mar 7, 2013 at 1:14

3 Answers 3

8

You don't need to recurse a recursive in Powershell. It will automatically go through all of the subdirectories of subdirectories.

I am also a little unsure of some of the information you wanted, but here is a script that does what you want mostly I believe and is IMO a little better to read.

Get-ChildItem -Path X:\Test -Recurse |`
foreach{
$Item = $_
$Type = $_.Extension
$Path = $_.FullName
$Folder = $_.PSIsContainer
$Age = $_.CreationTime

$Path | Select-Object `
    @{n="Name";e={$Item}},`
    @{n="Created";e={$Age}},`
    @{n="filePath";e={$Path}},`
    @{n="Extension";e={if($Folder){"Folder"}else{$Type}}}`
}| Export-Csv X:\Test\Results.csv -NoTypeInformation 

You will need to change your path, as I created this for a test. My results look like this in Excel:

+-------------------------------+----------------+-------------------------------------+-----------+
|             Name              |    Created     |              filePath               | Extension |
+-------------------------------+----------------+-------------------------------------+-----------+
|         test2                 | 3/6/2013 19:21 | X:\Test\test2                       | Folder    |
|         Results.csv           | 3/6/2013 19:51 | X:\Test\Results.csv                 | .csv      |
|         test3                 | 3/6/2013 19:21 | X:\Test\test2\test3                 | Folder    |
|         New Text Document.txt | 3/6/2013 19:21 | X:\Test\test2\New Text Document.txt | .txt      |
+-------------------------------+----------------+-------------------------------------+-----------+

Where it says "Folder" for the Extension just it returning that it is a directory instead of a blank (No extension).

5
  • That attribute is Parent, So if you change $_.Fullname to $_.Parent it would work, but for readability you can also change the variable name to $Parent, and then update the line @{n="filePath";e={$Path}},` to @{n="Folder Name";e={$Parent}},` Mar 7, 2013 at 3:00
  • Whoops, short sighted on that. Because you will be at a root "D:\" you need to populate that too. Otherwise you will end up with no exports on D:\ So change your select-object to @{n="Folder Name";e={if($Parent){$Parent}else{"Root"}}},` Mar 7, 2013 at 3:08
  • Get-ChildItem -Path d:\ -Recurse |` foreach{ $Item = $_ $Type = $_.Extension $Path = $_.FullName $FolderPath = $_.Parent $Folder = $_.PSIsContainer $Age = $_.CreationTime $Path | Select-Object ` @{n="Name";e={$Item}},` @{n="Created";e={$Age}},` @{n="filePath";e={$Path}},` @{n="Folder Name";e={$FolderPath}},` @{n="Extension";e={if($Folder){"Folder"}else{$Type}}}` }| Export-Csv d:\Results.csv -NoTypeInformation
    – torres
    Mar 7, 2013 at 3:20
  • What are you parsing? How many files are missing? Or is it entire directories? Any errors in the PS window? Run it from PowerGUI or call it from an open PS shell so it doesn't autoclose. Mar 7, 2013 at 3:23
  • I think its not reporting root containers, add this and post the results again. Its late here too, so calling it a night. Who knows, the old brain might not be working right to begin with... @{n="Container";e={$Folder}},` Mar 7, 2013 at 4:08
1

OK, I changed the way it checks for the parent. It is no longer looking directly at the Parent attribute, and it should correct it now.

    Get-ChildItem -Path D:\ -Recurse |`
foreach{
$Item = $_
$Type = $_.Extension
$Path = $_.FullName

$ParentS = ($_.Fullname).split("\")
$Parent = $ParentS[@($ParentS.Length - 2)]

$Folder = $_.PSIsContainer
$Age = $_.CreationTime

$Path | Select-Object `
    @{n="Name";e={$Item}},`
    @{n="Created";e={$Age}},`
    @{n="Folder Name";e={if($Parent){$Parent}else{$Parent}}},`
    @{n="filePath";e={$Path}},`
    @{n="Extension";e={if($Folder){"Folder"}else{$Type}}}`
}| Export-Csv X:\Test\ResultsC.csv -NoTypeInformation 

It is now taking the path to the current item, turning it into an array by splitting on the \, and then giving you the value at ArryLength - 2

3
  • What should I do here to get the full path (minus the fileName)? $ParentS[@($ParentS.Length - 2)]
    – torres
    Mar 7, 2013 at 12:58
  • I added a new variable $ParentPath = $_.PSParentPath and it sorta works but gives me this "Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::D:\Install Files\AutoSPInstaller\SP2010\AutoSPInstaller" . The "Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\FileSystem::" is extra which I dont need.
    – torres
    Mar 7, 2013 at 13:17
  • Fullname is the attribute to return the full path like D:\Folder1\Images\Image1.jpg, $ParentS = ($_.Fullname).split("\") $Parent = $ParentS[@($ParentS.Length - 2)] That gives you the folder path - the actual filename. Mar 7, 2013 at 14:07
1

I am not sure if this is the best approach but it works. I have a feeling code could be shorten to get the full path of a file.

$myDirectory = "D:\"
Get-ChildItem -Path $myDirectory -Recurse |`
foreach{
$Item = $_
$Type = $_.Extension
$Path = $_.FullName

$ParentS = ($_.Fullname).split("\")
$Parent = $ParentS[@($ParentS.Length - 2)]
$ParentPath = $_.PSParentPath
$ParentPathSplit = ($_.PSParentPath).split("::")
$ParentPathFinal = $ParentPathSplit[@($ParentPathSplit.Length -1)]
#$ParentPath = [io.path]::GetDirectoryName($myDirectory)

$Folder = $_.PSIsContainer
$Age = $_.CreationTime

$Path | Select-Object `
    @{n="Name";e={$Item}},`
    @{n="Created";e={$Age}},`
    @{n="Folder Name";e={if($Parent){$Parent}else{$Parent}}},`
    @{n="filePath";e={$Path}},`
    @{n="Extension";e={if($Folder){"Folder"}else{$Type}}},`
    @{n="Folder Name 2";e={if($Parent){$Parent}else{$Parent}}},`
    #@{n="Folder Path";e={$ParentPath}},`
    @{n="Folder Path 2";e={$ParentPathFinal}}`

}| Export-Csv d:\ResultsC_2_F.csv -NoTypeInformation 
1
  • 1
    Yes, FullName is the fullname attribute. With PS, you can also do a DIR | FL * That will give you all the available attributes (Some do not return a value in get-childitems) and then you can $_.AttributeName to get that value. Once you know what works, you can then do string manipulation. And the code could be shorter, but why, really? Readability is more important than saving a couple of lines, the execution time and filesize difference are near none. Mar 7, 2013 at 14:13

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