50

I have a the following structure:

src/
    modules/
        module1/
            js/
                main.js
            scss/
                main.scss
            index.html
        module2/
            js/
                main.js
            scss/
                main.scss
            index.html

I'd like to run a grunt task to copy these out to the following structure:

dev/
    js/
        module1.js
        module2.js
    css/
        module1.css
        module2.css
    module1.html
    module2.html

Is there a way to do this with an existing grunt plugin? If not, how could I achieve this?

87

This can be done using the grunt-contrib-copy plugin.

The main thing to note is that you can change the destination programmatically by using a rename function (which takes in the destination and source of each file).

Here is a (somewhat brittle) sample Gruntfile.js that should copy to your desired structure:

module.exports = function(grunt) {
  // Project configuration.
  grunt.initConfig({
    copy: {
      main: {
        files: [
          {
            expand: true, 
            cwd: 'src/modules/', 
            src: ['**/*.js'], 
            dest: 'dev/js/', 
            rename: function(dest, src) {
              // use the source directory to create the file
              // example with your directory structure
              //   dest = 'dev/js/'
              //   src = 'module1/js/main.js'
              return dest + src.substring(0, src.indexOf('/')) + '.js';
            }
          },
          {
            expand: true, 
            cwd: 'src/modules/', 
            src: ['**/*.scss'], 
            dest: 'dev/css/', 
            rename: function(dest, src) {
              return dest + src.substring(0, src.indexOf('/')) + '.css';
            }
          },
          {
            expand: true, 
            cwd: 'src/modules/', 
            src: ['**/*.html'], 
            dest: 'dev/', 
            rename: function(dest, src) {
              return dest + src.substring(0, src.indexOf('/')) + '.html';
            }
          }
        ]
      }
    }
  });

  grunt.loadNpmTasks('grunt-contrib-copy');

  // Default task(s).
  grunt.registerTask('default', ['copy']);
};
| improve this answer | |
  • Got reverse situation: needed to move files to different folders from one source. Your answer solved my problem, thanks! – kibin Oct 4 '13 at 19:35
  • 4
    also very important to note here is that if you want to skip certain files while renaming, the correct return value (the default) is return dest+'/'+src - which will cause the file to be copied to the default location. – guy mograbi Jan 6 '14 at 13:06
  • So, just to do a simple command line operation like copying files, you have to install a plugin? Do you have to install a plugin for basically every operation? – Jake Wilson Feb 6 '14 at 18:39
  • @Jakobud no you can use built-in Node.js methods for filehandling, see nodejs.org/api/fs.html although they are just low level – Capaj Mar 25 '14 at 15:59
  • 1
    @Malki I believe the rename functionality is actually a feature of grunt itself (and not specific to grunt-contrib-copy). I tested with grunt@0.4.5 and grunt-contrib-copy@0.7.0 and the rename function still gets called for me. Here is the code in grunt that runs the rename function. Let me know if there is an easy way to reproduce the issue you're having! – Gloopy Feb 12 '15 at 17:37
5

There's no need to use grunt-contrib-copy just for this any more, you can now take advantage of grunt.file.expandMapping which has options to just change the file extension, or to define a function that returns the output filename.

Here's an example of a files object in a jade task for compiling .jade templates into .html files:

files: [{
    expand: true, 
    src: "**/*.jade", 
    dest: "<%= distDir %>", 
    cwd: "<%= assetsDir %>/jade", 
    rename: function(dest, matchedSrcPath, options) {
        // return the destination path and filename:
        return (dest + matchedSrcPath).replace('.jade', '.html');
    }
}]

It would have been easier to use the ext: '.html' option instead of the rename option in this case, but I'm using rename here so you can see how it works.

More info about the ext and rename (and other) options in the grunt.file docs. Some more examples here and here.

| improve this answer | |
2

You could simply use the options: expand : true, flatten: true

No need for custom rename callbacks.

| improve this answer | |
0

Not exactly an answer to your question but i made it here looking for relative dest folders with grunt so... Here is how i solved it

...
base: {
  files:
  [
    {
      expand: true,
      cwd: 'app/design/frontend/',
      src: ['**/Magento_Sales/email-src/*.html'],
      dest: '../../Magento_Sales/email/',
      rename: function(dest, src, expand) {
        src = path.parse(src)
        return path.join(expand.cwd, src.dir, dest, src.base);
      }
    },
  ],
}
...

This little bit path.join(expand.cwd, src.dir, dest, src.base); just creating the path i need.

expand.cwd = app/design/frontend/

src.dir = <DYNAMIC_FOLDERS>/Magento_Sales/email-src/

dest = ../../Magento_Sales/email/

src.base = <FILE>.html

and all together it = app/design/frontend/<COMPANY>/<MAIN-THEME>/Magento_Sales/email/<FILE>.html

and in my situation it will now compile my html emails in relative destination folders

| improve this answer | |
0

if u want to rename .coffee files to .js or similar then just adapt it ;)

sudo npm install grunt-contrib-copy

copy: {
  rename: {
    files: [{
     expand: true,
     dot: true,
     cwd: './app/scripts',
     dest: './app/scripts/',
     src: [
       '**/*.coffee'
     ],
     rename: function(dest, src) {
       console.log(dest + src);
       return dest + src.replace('.coffee','.js');
     }
   }]
  }
},
| improve this answer | |

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