My script is called by server. From server I'll receive ID_OF_MESSAGE and TEXT_OF_MESSAGE.

In my script I'll handle incoming text and generate response with params: ANSWER_TO_ID and RESPONSE_MESSAGE.

The problem is that I'm sending response to incomming "ID_OF_MESSAGE", but server which send me message to handle will set his message as delivered to me (It means I can send him response to that ID), after receiving http response 200.

One of solution is to save message to database and make some cron which will be running each minute, but I need to generate response message immediately.

Is there some solution how to send to server http response 200 and than continue executing php script?

Thank you a lot

11 Answers 11

Yes. You can do this:

ignore_user_abort(true);
set_time_limit(0);

ob_start();
// do initial processing here
echo $response; // send the response
header('Connection: close');
header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
ob_end_flush();
ob_flush();
flush();

// now the request is sent to the browser, but the script is still running
// so, you can continue...
  • 3
    Excellent!! This is the only response to this question that actually works!!! 10p+ – Martin_Lakes Aug 1 '14 at 19:13
  • 2
    Awesome answer! The only thing I changed was set_time_limit(0);. You do probably want it to run for longer than the default 30 seconds, but indefinitely could cause problems if it goes into an infinite loop! I have a longer value set in my php.ini file. – CJ Dennis Aug 21 '14 at 14:25
  • 3
    is there a reason you use ob_flush after ob_end_flush? I understand the need for the flush function there at the end but I'm not sure why you would need ob_flush with ob_end_flush being called. – ars265 May 20 '15 at 13:40
  • 4
    Please note that if a content-encoding header is set to anything else than 'none' it could render this example useless as it would still let the user wait the full execution time (until timeout?). So to be absolutely sure it will work local ánd in the production environment, set the 'content-encoding' header to 'none': header("Content-Encoding: none") – Brian Jun 25 '15 at 7:04
  • 9
    Tip: I started using PHP-FPM, so I had to add fastcgi_finish_request() at the end – vcampitelli Sep 16 '15 at 13:18

I've seen a lot of responses on here that suggest using ignore_user_abort(true); but this code is not necessary. All this does is ensure your script continues executing before a response is sent in the event that the user aborts (by closing their browser or pressing escape to stop the request). But that's not what you're asking. You're asking to continue execution AFTER a response is sent. All you need is the following:

    // Buffer all upcoming output...
    ob_start();

    // Send your response.
    echo "Here be response";

    // Get the size of the output.
    $size = ob_get_length();

    // Disable compression (in case content length is compressed).
    header("Content-Encoding: none");

    // Set the content length of the response.
    header("Content-Length: {$size}");

    // Close the connection.
    header("Connection: close");

    // Flush all output.
    ob_end_flush();
    ob_flush();
    flush();

    // Close current session (if it exists).
    if(session_id()) session_write_close();

    // Start your background work here.
    ...

If you're concerned that your background work will take longer than PHP's default script execution time limit, then stick set_time_limit(0); at the top.

  • 2
    nice code! very useful! – Amy Neville Feb 12 '16 at 10:13
  • 3
    Tried a LOT of different combinations, THIS is the one that works!!! Thanks Kosta Kontos!!! – Martin_Lakes Aug 5 '16 at 10:43
  • 1
    Doesn't work for me in nginx, php 5.6 – Dave Aug 10 '16 at 22:38

If you're using FastCGI processing or PHP-FPM, you can:

session_write_close(); //close the session
fastcgi_finish_request(); //this returns 200 to the user, and processing continues

// do desired processing ...
$expensiveCalulation = 1+1;
error_log($expensiveCalculation);

Source: http://fi2.php.net/manual/en/function.fastcgi-finish-request.php

  • Thanks for this, after spending a few hours this worked for me in nginx – Ehsan Feb 14 '17 at 8:33
  • 1
    fastcgi_finish_request(); working on iis, thank you – dian May 3 '17 at 4:22
  • 2
    dat sum expensive calculation tho :o much impressed, such expensive! – Friedrich Roell Aug 22 at 18:18

I spent a few hours on this issue and I have come with this function which works on Apache and Nginx:

/**
 * respondOK.
 */
protected function respondOK()
{
    // check if fastcgi_finish_request is callable
    if (is_callable('fastcgi_finish_request')) {
        /*
         * This works in Nginx but the next approach not
         */
        session_write_close();
        fastcgi_finish_request();

        return;
    }

    ignore_user_abort(true);

    ob_start();
    $serverProtocole = filter_input(INPUT_SERVER, 'SERVER_PROTOCOL', FILTER_SANITIZE_STRING);
    header($serverProtocole.' 200 OK');
    header('Content-Encoding: none');
    header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
    header('Connection: close');

    ob_end_flush();
    ob_flush();
    flush();
}

You can call this function before your long processing.

Modified the answer by @vcampitelli a bit. Don't think you need the close header. I was seeing duplicate close headers in Chrome.

<?php

ignore_user_abort(true);

ob_start();
echo '{}';
header($_SERVER["SERVER_PROTOCOL"] . " 202 Accepted");
header("Status: 202 Accepted");
header("Content-Type: application/json");
header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
ob_end_flush();
ob_flush();
flush();

sleep(10);
  • 1
    I mentioned this in the original answer, but I'll say it here too. You do not necessarily need to have close the connection, but then what will happen is the next asset requested on the same connection will be forced to wait. So you could deliver the HTML fast but then one of your JS or CSS files might load slowly, as the connection has to finish getting the response from PHP before it can get the next asset. So for that reason, closing the connection is a good idea so the browser doesn't have to wait for it to be freed up. – Nate Lampton Sep 17 '15 at 3:42

I asked this question to Rasmus Lerdorf in April 2012, citing these articles:

I suggested the development of a new PHP built-in function to notify the platform that no further output (on stdout?) will be generated (such a function might take care of closing the connection). Rasmus Lerdorf responded:

See Gearman. You really really don't want your frontend Web servers doing backend processing like this.

I can see his point, and support his opinion for some applications/ loading scenarios! However, under some other scenarios, the solutions from vcampitelli et al, are good ones.

For some obscure reasons, none of these solutions work when using MAMP PRO (Apache, MySQL, PHP).

  • I am starting to think that it is because both the client and the server are on the same IP/Host. I will try to assign different local IPs or Interface or in a VM installed locally and see if I can make it work. PS: It works on a remote server. – asiby Jul 4 at 20:56

I have something that can compressed and send the response and let other php code to execute.

function sendResponse($response){
    $contentencoding = 'none';
    if(ob_get_contents()){
        ob_end_clean();
        if(ob_get_contents()){
            ob_clean();
        }
    }
    header('Connection: close');
    header("cache-control: must-revalidate");
    header('Vary: Accept-Encoding');
    header('content-type: application/json; charset=utf-8');
    ob_start();
    if(phpversion()>='4.0.4pl1' && extension_loaded('zlib') && GZIP_ENABLED==1 && !empty($_SERVER["HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING"]) && (strpos($_SERVER["HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING"], 'gzip') !== false) && (strstr($GLOBALS['useragent'],'compatible') || strstr($GLOBALS['useragent'],'Gecko'))){
        $contentencoding = 'gzip';
        ob_start('ob_gzhandler');
    }
    header('Content-Encoding: '.$contentencoding);
    if (!empty($_GET['callback'])){
        echo $_GET['callback'].'('.$response.')';
    } else {
        echo $response;
    }
    if($contentencoding == 'gzip') {
        if(ob_get_contents()){
            ob_end_flush(); // Flush the output from ob_gzhandler
        }
    }
    header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
    // flush all output
    if (ob_get_contents()){
        ob_end_flush(); // Flush the outer ob_start()
        if(ob_get_contents()){
            ob_flush();
        }
        flush();
    }
    if (session_id()) session_write_close();
}

I use the php function register_shutdown_function for this.

void register_shutdown_function ( callable $callback [, mixed $parameter [, mixed $... ]] )

http://php.net/manual/en/function.register-shutdown-function.php

Edit: The above is not working. It seems I was misled by some old documentation. The behaviour of register_shutdown_function has changed since PHP 4.1 link link

  • This is not what is being asked for - this function basically just extends the script termination event and is still part of the output buffer. – fisk Jan 3 '16 at 14:48
  • @Fiskie You're right. I've added an edit. – martti Jan 8 '16 at 11:15
  • Found it worth an upvote, cause it shows what does not work. – Trendfischer Sep 9 '16 at 13:06

There is another approach and its worthwhile considering if you don't want to tamper with the response headers. If you start a thread on another process the called function wont wait for its response and will return to the browser with a finalized http code. You will need to configure pthread.

class continue_processing_thread extends Thread 
{
     public function __construct($param1) 
     {
         $this->param1 = $param1
     }

     public function run() 
     {
        //Do your long running process here
     }
}

//This is your function called via an HTTP GET/POST etc
function rest_endpoint()
{
  //do whatever stuff needed by the response.

  //Create and start your thread. 
  //rest_endpoint wont wait for this to complete.
  $continue_processing = new continue_processing_thread($some_value);
  $continue_processing->start();

  echo json_encode($response)
}

Once we execute $continue_processing->start() PHP wont wait for the return result of this thread and therefore as far as rest_endpoint is considered. It is done.

Some links to help with pthreads

Good luck.

in case of php file_get_contents use, connection close is not enough. php still wait for eof witch send by server.

my solution is to read 'Content-Length:'

here is sample :

response.php:

 <?php

ignore_user_abort(true);
set_time_limit(500);

ob_start();
echo 'ok'."\n";
header('Connection: close');
header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
ob_end_flush();
ob_flush();
flush();
sleep(30);

Note the "\n" in response to close line, if not the fget read while wait eof.

read.php :

<?php
$vars = array(
    'hello' => 'world'
);
$content = http_build_query($vars);

fwrite($fp, "POST /response.php HTTP/1.1\r\n");
fwrite($fp, "Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded\r\n");
fwrite($fp, "Content-Length: " . strlen($content) . "\r\n");
fwrite($fp, "Connection: close\r\n");
fwrite($fp, "\r\n");

fwrite($fp, $content);

$iSize = null;
$bHeaderEnd = false;
$sResponse = '';
do {
    $sTmp = fgets($fp, 1024);
    $iPos = strpos($sTmp, 'Content-Length: ');
    if ($iPos !== false) {
        $iSize = (int) substr($sTmp, strlen('Content-Length: '));
    }
    if ($bHeaderEnd) {
        $sResponse.= $sTmp;
    }
    if (strlen(trim($sTmp)) == 0) {
        $bHeaderEnd = true;
    }
} while (!feof($fp) && (is_null($iSize) || !is_null($iSize) && strlen($sResponse) < $iSize));
$result = trim($sResponse);

As you can see this script dosent wait about eof if content length is reach.

hope it will help

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