5

I have the following simple code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int j = 0;
    Func<int> f = () =>
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            j += i;
        }
        return j;
    };

    int myStr = f();
    Console.WriteLine(myStr);
    Console.WriteLine(j);
    Console.Read();
}

From what I read when closures are involved, a new type is created by the compiler so it can store the captured variable and maintain a reference to it. However, when I run the following code, both printed lines show 3. I was expecting 0 and 3, because the anonymous method has its own variable in the generated class by the compiler. So why does it also modify the outside variable?

10

The outside variable and the variable in the closure are the same variable. Your program is equivalent to:

private class Closure
{
    public int j;
    public int Method()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            this.j += i;
        }
        return this.j;
    }
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Closure closure = new Closure();
    closure.j = 0;
    Func<int> f = closure.Method;
    int myStr = f();
    Console.WriteLine(myStr);
    Console.WriteLine(closure.j);
    Console.Read();
}

Now is it clear why you get the observed result?

  • Wow, first of all, haven't seen an answer from you for a while. Second, its very clear now, altough i looked at the IL, its somewhat giberish for me. I had no ideea it acts like that. – Freeman Mar 7 '13 at 16:04
  • 1
    Eric, you said this behavior may change in a future release of C#. I know you and MS said your goodbye's. However, did this change make it into 5.0 or still think that's gonna happen? – P.Brian.Mackey Mar 7 '13 at 16:07
  • 5
    @P.Brian.Mackey: The behaviour that a lambda captures an outer variable is by design and will never change. However, we did make a change in C# 5: the loop variable of a foreach is now logically inside the loop body, not logically outside the loop body. Therefore every time you close over the loop variable of a foreach you get a fresh variable to close over in C# 5.0, not a shared variable as you do in C# 4.0. – Eric Lippert Mar 7 '13 at 16:09
  • If there were two lambda's in Main which closed over the same variables, would the compiler generate a single Closure class, but with a separate Method for each of the lambdas? I guess it has to since they're closing over the same variables. – Tim Goodman Mar 7 '13 at 18:16
  • 1
    @TimGoodman: Yes. And in fact if there are two lambdas that close over different variables, only one closure is generated! This means that the lifetime of one variable can be extended by a delegate that does not close over it. It's a know shortcoming of C# that hopefully will eventually be addressed. – Eric Lippert Mar 7 '13 at 19:32
4

This is how closures work, they capture variables, not values. So j will be changed.

If you don't want that, you can do this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int j = 0;
    Func<int> f = () =>
    {
        int k = j;
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            k += i;
        }
        return k;
    };
    int myStr = f();
    Console.WriteLine(myStr);
    Console.WriteLine(j);
    Console.Read();
}

j is still captured by the closure, but not modified. Only the copy k is modified.

Edit:

You correctly note that this won't work for reference types. In that case k = j stores a copy of a reference to an object. There's still one copy of the object being referenced, so any modifications to that object will effect both variables.

Here's an example of how you would use the closure for a reference type and not update the original variable:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Foo j = new Foo(0);
    Func<Foo> f = () =>
    {
        Foo k = new Foo(j.N); // Can't just say k = j;
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            k.N += 1;
        }
        return k;
    };

    Console.WriteLine(f().N);
    Console.WriteLine(j.N);
    Console.Read();
}

public class Foo
{
    public int N { get; set; }

    public Foo(int n) { N = n; }
}

However, strings being immutable reference types, you actually can just say k = j, unlike with arbitrary reference types. One way to think of the immutability is that every time you update the value of a string, you are actually creating a new instance. So k = k + "1" is like saying k = new String(k + "1"). At that point, it's no longer a reference to the same string as j.

  • at first it look like very strange behaviour, altough k is a value type, thus its probably a new copy of j, so thats why only k is affected – Freeman Mar 7 '13 at 15:58
  • does copying the variable offer the same behaviour for reference types?What if j was a string for example. – Freeman Mar 7 '13 at 16:00
  • You're right that being a value type matters. For reference types, you have to construct a new object for k (e.g. with the new keyword). If you just say k = j they will refer to the same object. Strings are an exception though, because they're immutable -- essentially every time you update the value of a string, you're actually creating a new instance of the String class. – Tim Goodman Mar 7 '13 at 16:10
  • I've expanded my answer to cover how things are different for reference types. – Tim Goodman Mar 7 '13 at 16:23
  • Yes but it still modifies the both... my Env is .NET 4.5 with vs 2012 – Freeman Mar 7 '13 at 16:24
3

The language specification says:

Anonymous methods are similar to lambda functions in the Lisp programming language. C# 2.0 supports the creation of “closures” where anonymous methods access surrounding local variables and parameters.

And 'j' in your case is surrounding variable.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.