260

This is just a snippet of my code:

print("Total score for %s is %s  ", name, score)

But I want it to print out:

"Total score for (name) is (score)"

where name is a variable in a list and score is an integer. This is Python 3.3 if that helps at all.

11 Answers 11

463

There are many ways to do this. To fix your current code using %-formatting, you need to pass in a tuple:

  1. Pass it as a tuple:

    print("Total score for %s is %s" % (name, score))
    

A tuple with a single element looks like ('this',).

Here are some other common ways of doing it:

  1. Pass it as a dictionary:

    print("Total score for %(n)s is %(s)s" % {'n': name, 's': score})
    

There's also new-style string formatting, which might be a little easier to read:

  1. Use new-style string formatting:

    print("Total score for {} is {}".format(name, score))
    
  2. Use new-style string formatting with numbers (useful for reordering or printing the same one multiple times):

    print("Total score for {0} is {1}".format(name, score))
    
  3. Use new-style string formatting with explicit names:

    print("Total score for {n} is {s}".format(n=name, s=score))
    
  4. Concatenate strings:

    print("Total score for " + str(name) + " is " + str(score))
    

The clearest two, in my opinion:

  1. Just pass the values as parameters:

    print("Total score for", name, "is", score)
    

    If you don't want spaces to be inserted automatically by print in the above example, change the sep parameter:

    print("Total score for ", name, " is ", score, sep='')
    

    If you're using Python 2, won't be able to use the last two because print isn't a function in Python 2. You can, however, import this behavior from __future__:

    from __future__ import print_function
    
  2. Use the new f-string formatting in Python 3.6:

    print(f'Total score for {name} is {score}')
    
  • 7
    of course, there's always the age-old disapproved method: print("Total score for "+str(name)"+ is "+str(score)) – Snakes and Coffee Mar 8 '13 at 4:46
  • 4
    @SnakesandCoffee: I'd just do print("Total score for", name, "is", score) – Blender Mar 8 '13 at 4:47
  • 4
    My +1. These days I prefer the .format() as more readable than the older % (tuple) -- even though I have seen tests that show the % interpolation is faster. The print('xxx', a, 'yyy', b) is also fine for simple cases. I recommend also to learn .format_map() with dictionary as the argument, and with 'ssss {key1} xxx {key2}' -- nice for generating texts from templates. There is also the older string_template % dictionary. But the templates do not look that clean: 'ssss %(key1)s xxx %(key2)s'. – pepr Mar 8 '13 at 13:15
  • 5
    FYI, as of Python 3.6, we get f-strings, so you can now also do print(f"Total score for {name} is {score}") with no explicit function calls (as long as name and score are in scope obviously). – ShadowRanger Dec 7 '16 at 1:41
49

There are many ways to print that.

Let's have a look with another example.

a = 10
b = 20
c = a + b

#Normal string concatenation
print("sum of", a , "and" , b , "is" , c) 

#convert variable into str
print("sum of " + str(a) + " and " + str(b) + " is " + str(c)) 

# if you want to print in tuple way
print("Sum of %s and %s is %s: " %(a,b,c))  

#New style string formatting
print("sum of {} and {} is {}".format(a,b,c)) 

#in case you want to use repr()
print("sum of " + repr(a) + " and " + repr(b) + " is " + repr(c))

EDIT :

#New f-string formatting from Python 3.6:
print(f'Sum of {a} and {b} is {c}')
  • 2
    print("sum of {0} and {1} is {2}".format(a,b,c)) is overkill, you can omit to print("sum of {} and {} is {}".format(a,b,c)) unless you want to change order. – Jean-François Fabre Oct 23 '17 at 11:50
20

Use: .format():

print("Total score for {0} is {1}".format(name, score))

Or:

// Recommended, more readable code

print("Total score for {n} is {s}".format(n=name, s=score))

Or:

print("Total score for" + name + " is " + score)

Or:

`print("Total score for %s is %d" % (name, score))`
19

In Python 3.6, f-string is much cleaner.

In earlier version:

print("Total score for %s is %s. " % (name, score))

In Python 3.6:

print(f'Total score for {name} is {score}.')

will do.

It is more efficient and elegant.

14

Keeping it simple, I personally like string concatenation:

print("Total score for " + name + " is " + score)

It works with both Python 2.7 an 3.X.

NOTE: If score is an int, then, you should convert it to str:

print("Total score for " + name + " is " + str(score))
12

Just try:

print("Total score for", name, "is", score)
9

Just follow this

idiot_type = "the biggest idiot"
year = 22
print("I have been {} for {} years ".format(idiot_type, years))

OR

idiot_type = "the biggest idiot"
year = 22
print("I have been %s for %s years."% (idiot_type, year))

And forget all others, else the brain won't be able to map all the formats.

5
print("Total score for %s is %s  " % (name, score))

%s can be replace by %d or %f

5

If score is a number, then

print("Total score for %s is %d" % (name, score))

If score is a string, then

print("Total score for %s is %s" % (name, score))

If score is a number, then it's %d, if it's a string, then it's %s, if score is a float, then it's %f

3

This is what I do:

print("Total score for " + name + " is " + score)

Remember to put a space after for and before and after is.

3

Use f-string:

print(f'Total score for {name} is {score}')

Or

Use .format:

print("Total score for {} is {}".format(name, score))

protected by Community Apr 25 '17 at 20:54

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