313

This is just a snippet of my code:

print("Total score for %s is %s  ", name, score)

But I want it to print out:

"Total score for (name) is (score)"

where name is a variable in a list and score is an integer. This is Python 3.3 if that helps at all.

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11 Answers 11

577

There are many ways to do this. To fix your current code using %-formatting, you need to pass in a tuple:

  1. Pass it as a tuple:

    print("Total score for %s is %s" % (name, score))
    

A tuple with a single element looks like ('this',).

Here are some other common ways of doing it:

  1. Pass it as a dictionary:

    print("Total score for %(n)s is %(s)s" % {'n': name, 's': score})
    

There's also new-style string formatting, which might be a little easier to read:

  1. Use new-style string formatting:

    print("Total score for {} is {}".format(name, score))
    
  2. Use new-style string formatting with numbers (useful for reordering or printing the same one multiple times):

    print("Total score for {0} is {1}".format(name, score))
    
  3. Use new-style string formatting with explicit names:

    print("Total score for {n} is {s}".format(n=name, s=score))
    
  4. Concatenate strings:

    print("Total score for " + str(name) + " is " + str(score))
    

The clearest two, in my opinion:

  1. Just pass the values as parameters:

    print("Total score for", name, "is", score)
    

    If you don't want spaces to be inserted automatically by print in the above example, change the sep parameter:

    print("Total score for ", name, " is ", score, sep='')
    

    If you're using Python 2, won't be able to use the last two because print isn't a function in Python 2. You can, however, import this behavior from __future__:

    from __future__ import print_function
    
  2. Use the new f-string formatting in Python 3.6:

    print(f'Total score for {name} is {score}')
    
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  • 7
    of course, there's always the age-old disapproved method: print("Total score for "+str(name)"+ is "+str(score)) – Snakes and Coffee Mar 8 '13 at 4:46
  • 5
    @SnakesandCoffee: I'd just do print("Total score for", name, "is", score) – Blender Mar 8 '13 at 4:47
  • 4
    My +1. These days I prefer the .format() as more readable than the older % (tuple) -- even though I have seen tests that show the % interpolation is faster. The print('xxx', a, 'yyy', b) is also fine for simple cases. I recommend also to learn .format_map() with dictionary as the argument, and with 'ssss {key1} xxx {key2}' -- nice for generating texts from templates. There is also the older string_template % dictionary. But the templates do not look that clean: 'ssss %(key1)s xxx %(key2)s'. – pepr Mar 8 '13 at 13:15
  • 6
    FYI, as of Python 3.6, we get f-strings, so you can now also do print(f"Total score for {name} is {score}") with no explicit function calls (as long as name and score are in scope obviously). – ShadowRanger Dec 7 '16 at 1:41
58

There are many ways to print that.

Let's have a look with another example.

a = 10
b = 20
c = a + b

#Normal string concatenation
print("sum of", a , "and" , b , "is" , c) 

#convert variable into str
print("sum of " + str(a) + " and " + str(b) + " is " + str(c)) 

# if you want to print in tuple way
print("Sum of %s and %s is %s: " %(a,b,c))  

#New style string formatting
print("sum of {} and {} is {}".format(a,b,c)) 

#in case you want to use repr()
print("sum of " + repr(a) + " and " + repr(b) + " is " + repr(c))

EDIT :

#New f-string formatting from Python 3.6:
print(f'Sum of {a} and {b} is {c}')
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  • 3
    print("sum of {0} and {1} is {2}".format(a,b,c)) is overkill, you can omit to print("sum of {} and {} is {}".format(a,b,c)) unless you want to change order. – Jean-François Fabre Oct 23 '17 at 11:50
42

Use: .format():

print("Total score for {0} is {1}".format(name, score))

Or:

// Recommended, more readable code

print("Total score for {n} is {s}".format(n=name, s=score))

Or:

print("Total score for" + name + " is " + score)

Or:

`print("Total score for %s is %d" % (name, score))`
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21

In Python 3.6, f-string is much cleaner.

In earlier version:

print("Total score for %s is %s. " % (name, score))

In Python 3.6:

print(f'Total score for {name} is {score}.')

will do.

It is more efficient and elegant.

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15

Keeping it simple, I personally like string concatenation:

print("Total score for " + name + " is " + score)

It works with both Python 2.7 an 3.X.

NOTE: If score is an int, then, you should convert it to str:

print("Total score for " + name + " is " + str(score))
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12

Just try:

print("Total score for", name, "is", score)
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11

Just follow this

idiot_type = "the biggest idiot"
year = 22
print("I have been {} for {} years ".format(idiot_type, years))

OR

idiot_type = "the biggest idiot"
year = 22
print("I have been %s for %s years."% (idiot_type, year))

And forget all others, else the brain won't be able to map all the formats.

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6
print("Total score for %s is %s  " % (name, score))

%s can be replace by %d or %f

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6

Use f-string:

print(f'Total score for {name} is {score}')

Or

Use .format:

print("Total score for {} is {}".format(name, score))
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5

If score is a number, then

print("Total score for %s is %d" % (name, score))

If score is a string, then

print("Total score for %s is %s" % (name, score))

If score is a number, then it's %d, if it's a string, then it's %s, if score is a float, then it's %f

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3

This is what I do:

print("Total score for " + name + " is " + score)

Remember to put a space after for and before and after is.

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