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I am changing the div content through jQuery .html() method once I get the response text from Ajax event.

Sometimes I get more response data (contains html and script and about to 4MB data). It does take more time to set the response data as div content using jQuery .html() method.

Can somebody tell me the reason? Are there any solution or alternatives?

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    I think you have a bigger problem. For instance, why do you need the browser to load 4MB of html at once? Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:38
  • We are handling ajax events through out page. So entire page data has to be updated for every event.
    – Rama Rao M
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:41
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    @RamaRaoM - that is apparently why some of these enterprise applications really suck then. It's a very bad design choice to be regularly updating 4MB of HTML. There are many other design choices.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:48
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    @jfriend00 - +100 to your comment. I am continually appalled by the quality of "enterprise" applications. To the OP; you should strongly consider a new question on to how to avoid this "need". There is a better way.
    – Tim M.
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:56
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    @RamaRaoM - we would need a LOT more information about what your application is doing to know more explicitly what to recommend. The answer probably includes, incremental updates using smaller amounts of JSON data, incremental DOM changes rather than 4MB of HTML, rethought UI that doesn't try to put 4MB of HTML on one screen or modify 4MB of data at once, etc...
    – jfriend00
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 6:17

1 Answer 1

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First off, regularly downloading and inserting 4MB of HTML is NEVER going to make for a fast, interactive application. It's going to be a network hog and a memory hog and not perform well.

There is no technical limit to the .html() method other than how much memory the browser can get access to. .html() is a shell on top of the native .innerHTML property which has no particular limits.

4MB of HTML takes a significant time to download and a significant time for the browser to parse. That's probably the delay you see. The time is probably not related to jQuery. After a little initial housekeeping which has nothing to do with the actual content you are setting, jQuery just sets the .innerHTML property and the browser handles parsing the HTML content you gave it.

Now, if you are replacing a large amount of HTML (e.g. another 4MB set of HTML), then jQuery might be a lot slower because it has to traverse every element in the old content and make sure it has cleaned up any jQuery state associated with those elements that are about to be removed.


You really ought to fix your page design/app design so that you don't have to use 4MB of HTML.

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  • Oh..ok.But can you let me know that the browser limits of IE and Chrome?
    – Rama Rao M
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:43
  • I have debugged the script where I could find that jQuery.html() method takes more time.
    – Rama Rao M
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:45
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    @RamaRaoM - there are no hardcoded browser limits that I'm aware of. It likely depends upon how much RAM and swap space you have on your given computer. Mobile browsers would typically have access to a lot less memory than desktop browsers. You really need to fix your page design or app design so you aren't using 4MB of HTML!
    – jfriend00
    Commented Mar 8, 2013 at 4:45

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