114

Within C# application code, I would like to create and then interact with one or more SQLite databases.

What is the preferred method to initialize a new SQLite database file and open it for reading and writing?

Following the database's creation, how may I execute a DDL statement to create a table?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Richard Everett, Patrick Quirk, Shankar Damodaran, Nathan A, Andy Jones Nov 4 '14 at 20:48

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

234

The next link will bring you to a great tutorial, that helped me a lot!

How to SQLITE in C#

I nearly used everything in that article to create the SQLite database for my own C# Application.

Don't forget to download the SQLite.dll, and add it as a reference to your project. This can be done using NuGet and by adding the dll manually.

After you added the reference, refer to the dll from your code using the following line on top of your class:

using System.Data.SQLite;

You can find the dll's here:

SQLite DLL's

You can find the NuGet way here:

NuGet

Up next is the create script. Creating a database file:

SQLiteConnection.CreateFile("MyDatabase.sqlite");

SQLiteConnection m_dbConnection = new SQLiteConnection("Data Source=MyDatabase.sqlite;Version=3;");
m_dbConnection.Open();

string sql = "create table highscores (name varchar(20), score int)";

SQLiteCommand command = new SQLiteCommand(sql, m_dbConnection);
command.ExecuteNonQuery();

sql = "insert into highscores (name, score) values ('Me', 9001)";

command = new SQLiteCommand(sql, m_dbConnection);
command.ExecuteNonQuery();

m_dbConnection.Close();

After you created a create script in C#, I think you might want to add rollback transactions, it is safer and it will keep your database from failing, because the data will be committed at the end in one big piece as an atomic operation to the database and not in little pieces, where it could fail at 5th of 10 queries for example.

Example on how to use transactions:

 using (TransactionScope tran = new TransactionScope())
 {
     //Insert create script here.

     //Indicates that creating the SQLiteDatabase went succesfully, so the database can be committed.
     tran.Complete();
 }

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.