24

I have always wanted to do this but every time I start thinking about the problem it blows my mind because of its exponential nature.

The problem solver I want to be able to understand and code is for the countdown maths problem:

Given set of number X1 to X5 calculate how they can be combined using mathematical operations to make Y. You can apply multiplication, division, addition and subtraction.

So how does 1,3,7,6,8,3 make 348?

Answer: (((8 * 7) + 3) -1) *6 = 348.

How to write an algorithm that can solve this problem? Where do you begin when trying to solve a problem like this? What important considerations do you have to think about when designing such an algorithm?

  • 6
    Brute force? I.e. try all combinations until you have the correct answer. – Some programmer dude Mar 8 '13 at 11:50
  • Yes, I guess brute force is the way – Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 11:50
  • I think once you have bruteforce you can add follow up questions and people will love to help. – bjedrzejewski Mar 8 '13 at 11:55
  • 2
    +1 Really cool problem. The most difficult operator is the combination operation, where you place 2 or more digits next to each other creating a double-digit (or triple- etc) number, because that operator can only be used on "raw" numbers and not on computed numbers. Example: 368 - 17 - 3 = 348. – Klas Lindbäck Mar 8 '13 at 12:32
  • 1
    This answer seems relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/14309515/… – rici Mar 8 '13 at 17:01
6

Very quick and dirty solution in Java:

public class JavaApplication1
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(1, 3, 7, 6, 8, 3);
        for (Integer integer : list) {
            List<Integer> runList = new ArrayList<>(list);
            runList.remove(integer);
            Result result = getOperations(runList, integer, 348);
            if (result.success) {
                System.out.println(integer + result.output);
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    public static class Result
    {

        public String output;
        public boolean success;
    }

    public static Result getOperations(List<Integer> numbers, int midNumber, int target)
    {
        Result midResult = new Result();
        if (midNumber == target) {
            midResult.success = true;
            midResult.output = "";
            return midResult;
        }
        for (Integer number : numbers) {
            List<Integer> newList = new ArrayList<Integer>(numbers);
            newList.remove(number);
            if (newList.isEmpty()) {
                if (midNumber - number == target) {
                    midResult.success = true;
                    midResult.output = "-" + number;
                    return midResult;
                }
                if (midNumber + number == target) {
                    midResult.success = true;
                    midResult.output = "+" + number;
                    return midResult;
                }
                if (midNumber * number == target) {
                    midResult.success = true;
                    midResult.output = "*" + number;
                    return midResult;
                }
                if (midNumber / number == target) {
                    midResult.success = true;
                    midResult.output = "/" + number;
                    return midResult;
                }
                midResult.success = false;
                midResult.output = "f" + number;
                return midResult;
            } else {
                midResult = getOperations(newList, midNumber - number, target);
                if (midResult.success) {
                    midResult.output = "-" + number + midResult.output;
                    return midResult;
                }
                midResult = getOperations(newList, midNumber + number, target);
                if (midResult.success) {
                    midResult.output = "+" + number + midResult.output;
                    return midResult;
                }
                midResult = getOperations(newList, midNumber * number, target);
                if (midResult.success) {
                    midResult.output = "*" + number + midResult.output;
                    return midResult;
                }
                midResult = getOperations(newList, midNumber / number, target);
                if (midResult.success) {
                    midResult.output = "/" + number + midResult.output;
                    return midResult
                }
            }

        }
        return midResult;
    }
}

UPDATE

It's basically just simple brute force algorithm with exponential complexity. However you can gain some improvemens by leveraging some heuristic function which will help you to order sequence of numbers or(and) operations you will process in each level of getOperatiosn() function recursion.

Example of such heuristic function is for example difference between mid result and total target result.

This way however only best-case and average-case complexities get improved. Worst case complexity remains untouched.

Worst case complexity can be improved by some kind of branch cutting. I'm not sure if it's possible in this case.

  • That source code does not compile on my machine (javac 1.6.0_41). – Arne Mar 8 '13 at 17:16
  • 3
    Yes, there is Diamond notation - List<Integer> runList = new ArrayList<>(list); you have to use Java 7 or replace Diamond notation with classic java syntax. – Ondrej Bozek Mar 8 '13 at 18:52
  • Had few free minutes. Added some explanation and suggestion for improvements. Can provide cleaner implementation later. – Ondrej Bozek Mar 10 '13 at 11:29
  • I believe this solution is not exhaustive. For the original question it returns only 5 results, whereas my version returns 500. I'm not sure that it'd find a valid solution for each possible problem if it seemingly misses some valid matches. – mitchnull Mar 12 '13 at 8:59
  • I did some tests, and this indeed fails to find a match for 382 1,3,7,6,8,3, for example. (a valid match is 382 = ((7 * ((3 + 8) * (6 - 1))) - 3)) – mitchnull Mar 12 '13 at 9:29
7

Sure it's exponential but it's tiny so a good (enough) naive implementation would be a good start. I suggest you drop the usual infix notation with bracketing, and use postfix, it's easier to program. You can always prettify the outputs as a separate stage.

Start by listing and evaluating all the (valid) sequences of numbers and operators. For example (in postfix):

1 3 7 6 8 3 + + + + + -> 28
1 3 7 6 8 3 + + + + - -> 26

My Java is laughable, I don't come here to be laughed at so I'll leave coding this up to you.

To all the smart people reading this: yes, I know that for even a small problem like this there are smarter approaches which are likely to be faster, I'm just pointing OP towards an initial working solution. Someone else can write the answer with the smarter solution(s).

So, to answer your questions:

  • I begin with an algorithm that I think will lead me quickly to a working solution. In this case the obvious (to me) choice is exhaustive enumeration and testing of all possible calculations.
  • If the obvious algorithm looks unappealing for performance reasons I'll start thinking more deeply about it, recalling other algorithms that I know about which are likely to deliver better performance. I may start coding one of those first instead.
  • If I stick with the exhaustive algorithm and find that the run-time is, in practice, too long, then I might go back to the previous step and code again. But it has to be worth my while, there's a cost/benefit assessment to be made -- as long as my code can outperform Rachel Riley I'd be satisfied.
  • Important considerations include my time vs computer time, mine costs a helluva lot more.
  • This is definitely the thing to do. The order of the problem is 4^5 operator combinations * (9 choose 4) places for operators. (The first element in the string must be a number and the last must be an operator). Other sequences may produce illegal trees. That's just about 100M combinations ? – Aki Suihkonen Mar 8 '13 at 12:10
  • Also the selection of the representation of the equation is correct -- postfix or reverse polish can represent all combinations of parenthesis in the equation, although it can result in duplicated representation. Combinatorial analysis still reveals that the task is feasible. – Aki Suihkonen Mar 8 '13 at 12:20
  • 1
    I have a feeling that placing 6! number concatenated with 4^5 operators in this order would not handle cases with parenthesis -- as that order only produces left or right-associative expressions. I don't think one can evaluate (1+2)/(3+4) with 'N N N N op op op'. – Aki Suihkonen Mar 8 '13 at 12:37
  • 1
    The simplest counterexample I can think of is (1-3)-7, which can't be calculated by permuting 1,3,7 and followed by '--'. – Aki Suihkonen Mar 8 '13 at 15:08
  • 1
    I may not understand you guys here. I do not recommend postfix expression. What I recommend is simply list of numbers and list of operations to be applied. That solves most, but the tricks like '(a+b)/(c+d)'. Since it requires 2 places in memory to store. – bjedrzejewski Mar 8 '13 at 15:16
6

A working solution in c++11 below.

The basic idea is to use a stack-based evaluation (see RPN) and convert the viable solutions to infix notation for display purposes only.

If we have N input digits, we'll use (N-1) operators, as each operator is binary.

First we create valid permutations of operands and operators (the selector_ array). A valid permutation is one that can be evaluated without stack underflow and which ends with exactly one value (the result) on the stack. Thus 1 1 + is valid, but 1 + 1 is not.

We test each such operand-operator permutation with every permutation of operands (the values_ array) and every combination of operators (the ops_ array). Matching results are pretty-printed.

Arguments are taken from command line as [-s] <target> <digit>[ <digit>...]. The -s switch prevents exhaustive search, only the first matching result is printed.

(use ./mathpuzzle 348 1 3 7 6 8 3 to get the answer for the original question)

This solution doesn't allow concatenating the input digits to form numbers. That could be added as an additional outer loop.

The working code can be downloaded from here. (Note: I updated that code with support for concatenating input digits to form a solution)

See code comments for additional explanation.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <stack>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

namespace {

enum class Op {
    Add,
    Sub,
    Mul,
    Div,
};

const std::size_t NumOps = static_cast<std::size_t>(Op::Div) + 1;
const Op FirstOp = Op::Add;

using Number = int;

class Evaluator {
    std::vector<Number> values_; // stores our digits/number we can use
    std::vector<Op> ops_; // stores the operators
    std::vector<char> selector_; // used to select digit (0) or operator (1) when evaluating. should be std::vector<bool>, but that's broken

    template <typename T>
    using Stack = std::stack<T, std::vector<T>>;

    // checks if a given number/operator order can be evaluated or not
    bool isSelectorValid() const {
        int numValues = 0;
        for (auto s : selector_) {
            if (s) {
                if (--numValues <= 0) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            else {
                ++numValues;
            }
        }
        return (numValues == 1);
    }

    // evaluates the current values_ and ops_ based on selector_
    Number eval(Stack<Number> &stack) const {
        auto vi = values_.cbegin();
        auto oi = ops_.cbegin();
        for (auto s : selector_) {
            if (!s) {
                stack.push(*(vi++));
                continue;
            }
            Number top = stack.top();
            stack.pop();
            switch (*(oi++)) {
                case Op::Add:
                    stack.top() += top;
                    break;
                case Op::Sub:
                    stack.top() -= top;
                    break;
                case Op::Mul:
                    stack.top() *= top;
                    break;
                case Op::Div:
                    if (top == 0) {
                        return std::numeric_limits<Number>::max();
                    }
                    Number res = stack.top() / top;
                    if (res * top != stack.top()) {
                        return std::numeric_limits<Number>::max();
                    }
                    stack.top() = res;
                    break;
            }
        }
        Number res = stack.top();
        stack.pop();
        return res;
    }

    bool nextValuesPermutation() {
        return std::next_permutation(values_.begin(), values_.end());
    }

    bool nextOps() {
        for (auto i = ops_.rbegin(), end = ops_.rend(); i != end; ++i) {
            std::size_t next = static_cast<std::size_t>(*i) + 1;
            if (next < NumOps) {
                *i = static_cast<Op>(next);
                return true;
            }
            *i = FirstOp;
        }
        return false;
    }

    bool nextSelectorPermutation() {
        // the start permutation is always valid
        do {
            if (!std::next_permutation(selector_.begin(), selector_.end())) {
                return false;
            }
        } while (!isSelectorValid());
        return true;
    }

    static std::string buildExpr(const std::string& left, char op, const std::string &right) {
        return std::string("(") + left + ' ' + op + ' ' + right + ')';
    }

    std::string toString() const {
        Stack<std::string> stack;
        auto vi = values_.cbegin();
        auto oi = ops_.cbegin();
        for (auto s : selector_) {
            if (!s) {
                stack.push(std::to_string(*(vi++)));
                continue;
            }
            std::string top = stack.top();
            stack.pop();
            switch (*(oi++)) {
                case Op::Add:
                    stack.top() = buildExpr(stack.top(), '+', top);
                    break;
                case Op::Sub:
                    stack.top() = buildExpr(stack.top(), '-', top);
                    break;
                case Op::Mul:
                    stack.top() = buildExpr(stack.top(), '*', top);
                    break;
                case Op::Div:
                    stack.top() = buildExpr(stack.top(), '/', top);
                    break;
            }
        }
        return stack.top();
    }

public:
    Evaluator(const std::vector<Number>& values) :
            values_(values),
            ops_(values.size() - 1, FirstOp),
            selector_(2 * values.size() - 1, 0) {
        std::fill(selector_.begin() + values_.size(), selector_.end(), 1);
        std::sort(values_.begin(), values_.end());
    }

    // check for solutions
    // 1) we create valid permutations of our selector_ array (eg: "1 1 + 1 +",
    //    "1 1 1 + +", but skip "1 + 1 1 +" as that cannot be evaluated
    // 2) for each evaluation order, we permutate our values
    // 3) for each value permutation we check with each combination of
    //    operators
    // 
    // In the first version I used a local stack in eval() (see toString()) but
    // it turned out to be a performance bottleneck, so now I use a cached
    // stack. Reusing the stack gives an order of magnitude speed-up (from
    // 4.3sec to 0.7sec) due to avoiding repeated allocations.  Using
    // std::vector as a backing store also gives a slight performance boost
    // over the default std::deque.
    std::size_t check(Number target, bool singleResult = false) {
        Stack<Number> stack;

        std::size_t res = 0;
        do {
            do {
                do {
                    Number value = eval(stack);
                    if (value == target) {
                        ++res;
                        std::cout << target << " = " << toString() << "\n";
                        if (singleResult) {
                            return res;
                        }
                    }
                } while (nextOps());
            } while (nextValuesPermutation());
        } while (nextSelectorPermutation());
        return res;
    }
};

} // namespace

int main(int argc, const char **argv) {
    int i = 1;
    bool singleResult = false;
    if (argc > 1 && std::string("-s") == argv[1]) {
        singleResult = true;
        ++i;
    }
    if (argc < i + 2) {
        std::cerr << argv[0] << " [-s] <target> <digit>[ <digit>]...\n";
        std::exit(1);
    }
    Number target = std::stoi(argv[i]);
    std::vector<Number> values;
    while (++i <  argc) {
        values.push_back(std::stoi(argv[i]));
    }
    Evaluator evaluator{values};
    std::size_t res = evaluator.check(target, singleResult);
    if (!singleResult) {
        std::cout << "Number of solutions: " << res << "\n";
    }
    return 0;
}
  • Vote up for more solutions than the excepted answer! – bjedrzejewski Mar 12 '13 at 9:28
5

Input is obviously a set of digits and operators: D={1,3,3,6,7,8,3} and Op={+,-,*,/}. The most straight forward algorithm would be a brute force solver, which enumerates all possible combinations of these sets. Where the elements of set Op can be used as often as wanted, but elements from set D are used exactly once. Pseudo code:

D={1,3,3,6,7,8,3}
Op={+,-,*,/}
Solution=348
for each permutation D_ of D:
   for each binary tree T with D_ as its leafs:
       for each sequence of operators Op_ from Op with length |D_|-1:
           label each inner tree node with operators from Op_
           result = compute T using infix traversal
           if result==Solution
              return T
return nil

Other than that: read jedrus07's and HPM's answers.

0

I think, you need to strictly define the problem first. What you are allowed to do and what you are not. You can start by making it simple and only allowing multiplication, division, substraction and addition.

Now you know your problem space- set of inputs, set of available operations and desired input. If you have only 4 operations and x inputs, the number of combinations is less than:

The number of order in which you can carry out operations (x!) times the possible choices of operations on every step: 4^x. As you can see for 6 numbers it gives reasonable 2949120 operations. This means that this may be your limit for brute force algorithm.

Once you have brute force and you know it works, you can start improving your algorithm with some sort of A* algorithm which would require you to define heuristic functions.

In my opinion the best way to think about it is as the search problem. The main difficulty will be finding good heuristics, or ways to reduce your problem space (if you have numbers that do not add up to the answer, you will need at least one multiplication etc.). Start small, build on that and ask follow up questions once you have some code.

0

I found great algorithm from Oxford's Computer Science Docs (with Java Source Code) a long time ago. And I admire it every time when read this solution. I believe it will be helpful.

0

By far the easiest approach is to intelligently brute force it. There is only a finite amount of expressions you can build out of 6 numbers and 4 operators, simply go through all of them.

How many? Since you don't have to use all numbers and may use the same operator multiple times, This problem is equivalent to "how many labeled strictly binary trees (aka full binary trees) can you make with at most 6 leaves, and four possible labels for each non-leaf node?".

The amount of full binary trees with n leaves is equal to catalan(n-1). You can see this as follows:

Every full binary tree with n leaves has n-1 internal nodes and corresponds to a non-full binary tree with n-1 nodes in a unique way (just delete all the leaves from the full one to get it). There happen to be catalan(n) possible binary trees with n nodes, so we can say that a strictly binary tree with n leaves has catalan(n-1) possible different structures.

There are 4 possible operators for each non-leaf node: 4^(n-1) possibilities The leaves can be numbered in n! * (6 choose (n-1)) different ways. (Divide this by k! for each number that occurs k times, or just make sure all numbers are different)

So for 6 different numbers and 4 possible operators you get Sum(n=1...6) [ Catalan(n-1) * 6!/(6-n)! * 4^(n-1) ] possible expressions for a total of 33,665,406. Not a lot.

How do you enumerate these trees?

Given a collection of all trees with n-1 or less nodes, you can create all trees with n nodes by systematically pairing all of the n-1 trees with the empty tree, all n-2 trees with the 1 node tree, all n-3 trees with all 2 node tree etc. and using them as the left and right sub trees of a newly formed tree.

So starting with an empty set you first generate the tree that has just a root node, then from a new root you can use that either as a left or right sub tree which yields the two trees that look like this: / and . And so on.

You can turn them into a set of expressions on the fly (just loop over the operators and numbers) and evaluate them as you go until one yields the target number.

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