8

In pre-11 C++ I had something like this:

template<class T,class U,class V>
struct Foo : T,U,V {

  bool init() {

    if(!T::init() || !U::init() || !V::init())
      return false;

    // do local init and return true/false
  }
};

I'd like to convert this to C++11 variadic syntax to get the benefit of the flexible length argument list. I understand the concept of unpacking the template arg list using recursion but I just can't seen to get the syntax right. Here's what I've tried:

template<typename... Features>
struct Foo : Features... {

  template<typename F,typename... G>
  bool recinit(F& arg,G&& ...args) {

    if(!F::init())
      return false;

    return recinit<F,G...>(args...);
  }

  bool init() {
    // how to call recinit() from here?
  }
};

I would prefer the order of the calls to the base class init() functions to be left-to-right but it's not critical.

  • 2
    Not sure what you are trying to achieve: your recinit function is infinitely recursive, or am I mistaken? how do you expect to call it from init(), with what arguments? – Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 14:14
  • 3
    Stop using an init method and use a constructor. – Nicol Bolas Mar 8 '13 at 14:21
4

This should work:

template<typename F, typename... T>
    struct recinit;

template<typename F>
    struct recinit<F> {
        static bool tinit(F *) {
            return true;
        }
    };
template<typename F, typename T, typename... G>
    struct recinit<F, T, G...> {
        static bool tinit(F *ptr)  {
            if (!ptr->T::init())
                return false;
            return recinit<F, G...>::tinit(ptr);
        }
    };

template<typename... Features>
struct Foo : Features... {

    bool init() {
        bool res = recinit<Foo, Features...>::tinit(this);
        //use res wisely
    }
};

Your problem is that you cannot write partial specializations of functions, only of classes/structs. And the auxiliary struct has to be outside of Foo or else it will get the template arguments from the enclosing struct, and that would be bad.

You don't say but I'm assuming that init is a non-static member function. If that is the case, the args arguments make little sense: all of them should be this! So just past this once and avoid the pack in the arguments. I tried passing this as a void* but that may be troublesome, so I just added an additional template argument to recinit that will be Foo.

And also, each time you do one recursive step remember to remove one parameter.

  • Even though I'm sure all the voted responses are good, this is the one that most fits my requirements. I plugged it in to my hierarchy and it works perfectly and rodrigo you were correct to assume that init() is a non-static member function. I learned something new today, and on a Friday too. Good stuff. – Andy Brown Mar 8 '13 at 15:49
  • @AndyBrown: Re-reading my answer, the static_cast is not really needed, because T must be a base class of F. Removed, code is always nicer without casts. – rodrigo Mar 8 '13 at 17:58
3

Maybe you could try something like this:

template<typename... Features>
struct Foo : Features...
{
    bool init()
    {
        // Courtesy of Xeo :-)
        auto il = {(static_cast<bool (Foo::*)()>(&Features::init))...};
        return std::all_of(il.begin(), il.end(), 
            [this] (bool (Foo::*f)()) { return (this->*f)(); }
            );
    }
};

Here is an alternative, more verbose version that uses variadic templates:

template<typename... Features>
struct Foo : Features...
{
    bool init()
    {
        return combine_and((&Features::init)...);
    }

private:

    bool combine_and()
    {
        return true;
    }

    template<typename F>
    bool combine_and(F f)
    {
        return (this->*f)();
    }

    template<typename F1, typename... Fs>
    bool combine_and(F1 f1, Fs... fs)
    {
        return ((this->*f1)() && combine_and(fs...));
    }
};

Whichever solution you pick, this is how you could use it:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct A { bool init() { cout << "Hello " << endl; return true; } };
struct B { bool init() { cout << "Template " << endl; return true; } };
struct C { bool init() { cout << "World!" << endl; return true; } };

int main()
{
    Foo<A, B, C> f;
    bool res = f.init(); // Prints "Hello Template World!"
    cout << res; // Prints 1
}
  • This doesn't collect the return values from the features' inits, though. Should be more like fold<collect_invoke_init, always_true_init, Features...>();. – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 14:20
  • @Xeo: I edited the answer. This one seems OK to me. – Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 14:33
  • 2
    auto il = {Features::init()...}; return std::all_of(il.begin(), il.end(), [](bool b){ return b;}); :) – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 14:38
  • Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the OP's code features "short circuit" evaluation of the init functions whereas your code evaluates all init functions before examining their results. I don't know if the distinction is important here but it could potentially lead to different outcomes. – Andrew Durward Mar 8 '13 at 14:40
  • 2
    Lalala~ /cc @KonradRudolph – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 15:00
2

Your code has two problems. First, the rather mundane:

return recinit<F,G...>(args...);

You’ve already handled F, leave it off from the list of arguments.

return recinit<G...>(args...);

(Additionally you should probably perfectly-forward the arguments.)

Secondly, the code won’t compile because your recursion has an anchor at runtime but not at compile time. That is, the compiler will try unpacking the argument pack G ad infinitum. In order to prevent this you need to specialise the function for an empty template argument list.

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