29

I would like to define some generic decorators to check arguments before calling some functions.

Something like:

@checkArguments(types = ['int', 'float'])
def myFunction(thisVarIsAnInt, thisVarIsAFloat)
    ''' Here my code '''
    pass

Side notes:

  1. Type checking is just here to show an example
  2. I'm using Python 2.7 but Python 3.0 whould be interesting too
  • 5
    As a note, this is generally a really bad idea - it goes against the grain of Python. Type checking is a bad thing in almost all cases. It's also worth noting that it might make more sense to use argument annotations to do this if you are in 3.x. – Gareth Latty Mar 8 '13 at 17:35
  • 4
    @Lattyware: Enforcing function arguments and return types is one of examples in the original pep for decorators – jfs Mar 8 '13 at 17:43
  • 1
    @Lattyware: it's unpythonic, but if you really want to do it, decorator and argument annotation is the best way to do it. – Lie Ryan Mar 8 '13 at 17:57
  • 2
    You guys are trolling right ? or Is it me becoming quite touchy on this philosophical point ? ;) – AsTeR Mar 8 '13 at 18:00
  • 1
    I'm not trolling, I'm just making the point that most of the time, if you are type checking, you are doing it wrong, and would be better off doing it another way. It's really common to see people on SO type checking and producing inflexible functions that don't work as well or as efficiently thanks to type checking. – Gareth Latty Mar 8 '13 at 18:00
33

From the Decorators for Functions and Methods:

Python 2

def accepts(*types):
    def check_accepts(f):
        assert len(types) == f.func_code.co_argcount
        def new_f(*args, **kwds):
            for (a, t) in zip(args, types):
                assert isinstance(a, t), \
                       "arg %r does not match %s" % (a,t)
            return f(*args, **kwds)
        new_f.func_name = f.func_name
        return new_f
    return check_accepts

Python 3

In Python 3 func_code has changed to __code__ and func_name has changed to __name__.

def accepts(*types):
    def check_accepts(f):
        assert len(types) == f.__code__.co_argcount
        def new_f(*args, **kwds):
            for (a, t) in zip(args, types):
                assert isinstance(a, t), \
                       "arg %r does not match %s" % (a,t)
            return f(*args, **kwds)
        new_f.__name__ = f.__name__
        return new_f
    return check_accepts

Usage:

@accepts(int, (int,float))
def func(arg1, arg2):
    return arg1 * arg2

func(3, 2) # -> 6
func('3', 2) # -> AssertionError: arg '3' does not match <type 'int'>

arg2 can be either int or float

  • I'm using it on some method, but it seems that f has always the value of the last defined function. Do you happen to know where this could come from ? – AsTeR Mar 9 '13 at 13:53
  • 1
    @AsTeR: Create a minimal complete code example that reproduces your problem and post it as a new question. – jfs Mar 9 '13 at 21:17
  • 3
    I recommend to use this solution, it has good readability if there are many input params. code.activestate.com/recipes/… – Andrey Nikishaev Jan 14 '14 at 11:25
  • 2
    @IAbstract In Python 3, func_code (as I know) has been replaced with the magic attribute __code__ instead. – user4447514 Apr 12 '16 at 19:58
  • 1
    @user4447514 func_name has also been replaced by __name__ – Mike Colacino Feb 13 '19 at 17:13
15

On Python 3.3, you can use function annotations and inspect:

import inspect

def validate(f):
    def wrapper(*args):
        fname = f.__name__
        fsig = inspect.signature(f)
        vars = ', '.join('{}={}'.format(*pair) for pair in zip(fsig.parameters, args))
        params={k:v for k,v in zip(fsig.parameters, args)}
        print('wrapped call to {}({})'.format(fname, params))
        for k, v in fsig.parameters.items():
            p=params[k]
            msg='call to {}({}): {} failed {})'.format(fname, vars, k, v.annotation.__name__)
            assert v.annotation(params[k]), msg
        ret = f(*args)
        print('  returning {} with annotation: "{}"'.format(ret, fsig.return_annotation))
        return ret
    return wrapper

@validate
def xXy(x: lambda _x: 10<_x<100, y: lambda _y: isinstance(_y,float)) -> ('x times y','in X and Y units'):
    return x*y

xy = xXy(10,3)
print(xy)

If there is a validation error, prints:

AssertionError: call to xXy(x=12, y=3): y failed <lambda>)

If there is not a validation error, prints:

wrapped call to xXy({'y': 3.0, 'x': 12})
  returning 36.0 with annotation: "('x times y', 'in X and Y units')"

You can use a function rather than a lambda to get a name in the assertion failure.

  • Looks interesting but really tough to understand at first glance. I'll give a look when I'll be less tired. – AsTeR Mar 8 '13 at 17:46
  • 3
    This is an incredibly obfuscatory implementation. Technically, it works. But it makes the eyes bleed. For a far more readable (albeit slightly less powerful) alternative, see sweeneyrod's concise @checkargs decorator under a similar question. – Cecil Curry Jun 15 '16 at 3:17
  • @CecilCurry: Can you elaborate why you think it is so bad? I think the checking via lambda very sensible. – Make42 Nov 26 '19 at 10:15
9

As you certainly know, it's not pythonic to reject an argument only based on its type.
Pythonic approach is rather "try to deal with it first"
That's why I would rather do a decorator to convert the arguments

def enforce(*types):
    def decorator(f):
        def new_f(*args, **kwds):
            #we need to convert args into something mutable   
            newargs = []        
            for (a, t) in zip(args, types):
               newargs.append( t(a)) #feel free to have more elaborated convertion
            return f(*newargs, **kwds)
        return new_f
    return decorator

This way, your function is fed with the type you expect But if the parameter can quack like a float, it is accepted

@enforce(int, float)
def func(arg1, arg2):
    return arg1 * arg2

print (func(3, 2)) # -> 6.0
print (func('3', 2)) # -> 6.0
print (func('three', 2)) # -> ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: 'three'

I use this trick (with proper conversion method) to deal with vectors.
Many methods I write expect MyVector class as it has plenty of functionalities; but sometime you just want to write

transpose ((2,4))
  • 1
    "As you certainly know, it's not pythonic to reject an argument only based on its type.". Do you have reference for that? – spinkus Jul 7 '16 at 10:30
  • 1
    I believe he's referencing "duck typing", if it quacks like a duck and walks like a duck then it's a duck... but then I would argue with primitive types, such as float and decimal, eg. Decimal(1.3) is not the same as Decimal('1.3') – James Lin Oct 7 '18 at 22:31
  • 1
    Doesn't this solution break if I call func(3, arg2=2)? Then, 3 is in *args and 2 is in **kwargs because the latter was provided as keyword argument. – daniel.neumann Jan 20 at 13:37
2

To enforce string arguments to a parser that would throw cryptic errors when provided with non-string input, I wrote the following, which tries to avoid allocation and function calls:

from functools import wraps

def argtype(**decls):
    """Decorator to check argument types.

    Usage:

    @argtype(name=str, text=str)
    def parse_rule(name, text): ...
    """

    def decorator(func):
        code = func.func_code
        fname = func.func_name
        names = code.co_varnames[:code.co_argcount]

        @wraps(func)
        def decorated(*args,**kwargs):
            for argname, argtype in decls.iteritems():
                try:
                    argval = args[names.index(argname)]
                except ValueError:
                    argval = kwargs.get(argname)
                if argval is None:
                    raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s' is null"
                                    % (fname, argname))
                if not isinstance(argval, argtype):
                    raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s': type is %s, must be %s"
                                    % (fname, argname, type(argval), argtype))
            return func(*args,**kwargs)
        return decorated

    return decorator
  • I ended up using this one: relatively simple, uses only standard library, and it works with variable number of *args and **kwargs. Only caveat is that func_code was renamed to __code__ in Python 3, I don't know if there's a cross-version way to do this. – astrojuanlu Jul 1 '15 at 19:19
1

All of these posts seem out of date - pint now provides this functionality built in. See here. Copied here for posterity:

Checking dimensionality When you want pint quantities to be used as inputs to your functions, pint provides a wrapper to ensure units are of correct type - or more precisely, they match the expected dimensionality of the physical quantity.

Similar to wraps(), you can pass None to skip checking of some parameters, but the return parameter type is not checked.

>>> mypp = ureg.check('[length]')(pendulum_period) 

In the decorator format:

>>> @ureg.check('[length]')
... def pendulum_period(length):
...     return 2*math.pi*math.sqrt(length/G)
0

I have a slightly improved version of @jbouwmans sollution, using python decorator module, which makes the decorator fully transparent and keeps not only signature but also docstrings in place and might be the most elegant way of using decorators

from decorator import decorator

def check_args(**decls):
    """Decorator to check argument types.

    Usage:

    @check_args(name=str, text=str)
    def parse_rule(name, text): ...
    """
    @decorator
    def wrapper(func, *args, **kwargs):
        code = func.func_code
        fname = func.func_name
        names = code.co_varnames[:code.co_argcount]
        for argname, argtype in decls.iteritems():
            try:
                argval = args[names.index(argname)]
            except IndexError:
                argval = kwargs.get(argname)
            if argval is None:
                raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s' is null"
                            % (fname, argname))
            if not isinstance(argval, argtype):
                raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s': type is %s, must be %s"
                            % (fname, argname, type(argval), argtype))
    return func(*args, **kwargs)
return wrapper
0

I think the Python 3.5 answer to this question is beartype. As explained in this post it comes with handy features. Your code would then look like this

from beartype import beartype
@beartype
def sprint(s: str) -> None:
   print(s)

and results in

>>> sprint("s")
s
>>> sprint(3)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<string>", line 13, in func_beartyped
TypeError: sprint() parameter s=3 not of <class 'str'>
0

The package typeguard provides a decorator for this, it reads the type information from type annotations, it requires Python >=3.5.2 though. I think the resulting code is quite nice.

@typeguard.typechecked
def my_function(this_var_is_an_int: int, this_var_is_a_float: float)
    ''' Here my code '''
    pass

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.