24

I have two C# winform (.NET 4.0) forms that each run separate but similar automated tasks continuously. Separate in that they are distinct processes/workflows, but similar enough in how they operate to share the same resources (methods, data models, assemblies, etc) in the project.

Both forms are complete, but now I'm not sure how to run the program so that each window opens on launch and runs independently. The program will be "always-on" when deployed.

This might seem a little basic, but most of my development experience has been web applications. Threading/etc is still a little foreign to me. I've researched but most of the answers I've found relate to user interaction and sequential use cases -- this will just be one system continuously running two distinct processes, which will need to interact with the world independently.

Potential solutions I've found might involve multi-threading, or maybe some kind of MDI, or a few folks have suggested the DockPanelSuite (although being in a super-corporate environment, downloading third party files is easier said than done).

static class Program
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);

        // Rather than specifying frmOne or frmTwo,
        // load both winforms and keep them running.
        Application.Run(new frmOne());
    }
}
9
  • 3
    Why you cannot just create two forms and show them?
    – wRAR
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:37
  • @wRAR Well, the one thing that comes to mind is that the program probably shouldn't stop until both forms are closed, rather than just one.
    – Servy
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:39
  • 1
    If you mean.... frmOne one = new frmOne(); frmTwo two = new frmTwo(); one.Show(); two.Show(); ... I tried that, but it doesn't keep the program running. The program shows both forms for a second and then ends. I'm sure there's every chance that I'm doing it wrong.
    – RJB
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:43
  • Application.Run waits until the form exits. If you just instantiate 2 forms the application will exist immediately
    – bas
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:44
  • 1
    You may want to consider splitting the code into two separate windows forms projects and putting all the common code into a third class library project.
    – StingyJack
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:03

3 Answers 3

45

You can create a new ApplicationContext to represent multiple forms:

public class MultiFormContext : ApplicationContext
{
    private int openForms;
    public MultiFormContext(params Form[] forms)
    {
        openForms = forms.Length;

        foreach (var form in forms)
        {
            form.FormClosed += (s, args) =>
            {
                //When we have closed the last of the "starting" forms, 
                //end the program.
                if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref openForms) == 0)
                    ExitThread();
            };

            form.Show();
        }
    }
}

Using that you can now write:

Application.EnableVisualStyles();
Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
Application.Run(new MultiFormContext(new Form1(), new Form2()));
12
  • 1
    +1 Interesting solution that allows the forms to be independent of each other (i.e. one form does not have to spawn and control the life of the other.)
    – Paul Sasik
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:01
  • I'm trying to test both answers right now, but this code doesn't actually open either form. Sorry, I've written it just as I see here (with the right params of course), is there something that I might be missing?
    – RJB
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:08
  • @RJB Oh, it creates the forms but doesn't show them; it's a trivial line to add.
    – Servy
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:09
  • @Servy you might have the best solution. MSDN provides something very similar (but less generic, matter of taste I guess). Here is the link to MSDN msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…. +1 for best answer
    – bas
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:29
  • 1
    @AlexanderAleksandrovičKlimov Correct, if you're not exposing the application context through another thread it'd only be accessed through the UI thread.
    – Servy
    Nov 23, 2016 at 16:32
10

If you really need two windows/forms to run on two separate UI threads, you could do something like this:

static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);

        var thread = new Thread(ThreadStart);
        // allow UI with ApartmentState.STA though [STAThread] above should give that to you
        thread.TrySetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA); 
        thread.Start(); 

        Application.Run(new frmOne());
    }

    private static void ThreadStart()
    {
        Application.Run(new frmTwo()); // <-- other form started on its own UI thread
    }
}
5
  • does that really works? it looks like trouble. that means that you have "2 main threads" or something? Would you use this yourself? (really just asking, not trying to put your answer in a negative light)
    – bas
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:46
  • Having multiple UI threads should really be avoided whenever possible. Particularly given that these forms are likely going to need to interact with each other since they have shared resources.
    – Servy
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:47
  • @bas: Yes, this does work. I would only use it very rare and specific cases. I could not tell from the OP's question if a separate UI thread is really needed.
    – Paul Sasik
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:50
  • @Servy: I completely agree about your threading statement. I'm just offering an option. If possible, two separate forms in one thread are much preferable.
    – Paul Sasik
    Mar 8, 2013 at 18:51
  • I've selected this as the answer. Due to an unrelated problem with a grumpy ActiveX control on my "frmOne", I needed to move the ThreadStart function to just after loading frmOne. Other than that, this appears to work very well. Separate UI threads were necessary in order for the forms to asynchronously interact with a database and drive separate mainframe controls, as I describe more in Servy's answer. Thank you Paul and everyone for your time! You guys rock.
    – RJB
    Mar 8, 2013 at 20:09
1

Assumption

You do not need the two different processes, you are only using the 2 processes because you want to have the two different forms and want to be able to keep the application running until both forms are exited.

Another solution

Rely on the Form.Closed event mechanism. You can add an eventhandler which allows you to specify what to do when a form closes. E.g. exit the application when both forms are closed.

In terms of some code

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _form2 = new Form2();
        _form2.Show(this);

        this.Closed += Form1Closed;
        _form2.Closed += Form2Closed;
    }

    protected override void OnFormClosing(FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Cancel = true;
        Hide();
        Form1Closed(this, new EventArgs());
        base.OnFormClosing(e);
    }

    private void Form1Closed(object sender, EventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        form1IsClosed = true;

        TryExitApplication();
    }

    private void Form2Closed(object sender, EventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        _form2IsClosed = true;

        TryExitApplication();
    }

    private void TryExitApplication()
    {
        if (form1IsClosed && _form2IsClosed)
        {
            Dispose();
            Application.Exit();
        }
    }

Note that this should be refactored to make it a better solution.


UPDATE

The comments provided by Servy made my revise this "supposed to be simple solution", which pointed out that his solution is way better then this solution. Since I am supported to leave the answer I will use this answer I will also address the issues that start arising when going for this solution:

  • cancelling close events
  • rerouting from one event to another
  • force calling Dispose.
  • as Servy pointed out: maintenance unfriendly (state to check which form is closed)
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  • 1) this is actually more code than just using an application context. 2) It forces the logic to be embedded throughout the forms, rather than located in a single logical location. 3) It doesn't currently work; you need to stop closing of the main form for this to work, which means it can't be disposed, it's resources collected, etc. 4) Nothing about this is re-usable or scalable. You need to re-do all of the work, from scratch, for each project. If you write a custom app context you write it once and you're done, forever. 5) This is rather bug prone; it's easy to leave some little bit out.
    – Servy
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:11
  • @Servy I am a bit surprised by a few of your remarks. 1) more code is irrelevant as long as it's easy to maintain and easy to understand. 2) You can refactor this out easily in a single generic piece of code. 3) you got a point there. That can be fixed. 4) Again, write working sane code first, then start to optimize and refactor. Reuse code when you need it somewhere else instead of writing generic code that people don't understand. 5) It's simplistic code, how can that be error prone.
    – bas
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:24
  • 1) But it's not easy to maintain; it's harder to maintain. To add a new startup form you need to add a new custom handler, a new boolean field, and edit the check in TryExitApplication. 2) You mean like what's done in my answer? Yes, you can, my point is you choose not to. 4) You provided this as an alternative to another solution that is already sane, working, and optimized. If there were no other solutions presented, then sure, it's better than nothing. I know I used this model once upon a time. 5) Considering you have an error in the code, and still haven't fixed it...see point #3.
    – Servy
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:29
  • @Servy yeah I'll remove my answer. I thought yours was "over doing it" but after visiting MSDN I see that you have the better solution. Will go feed the baby and remove it so that I am sure you read this comment :)
    – bas
    Mar 8, 2013 at 19:31
  • 2
    @bas That's why I make these comments. I'm glad you [and I] learned something.
    – Servy
    Mar 8, 2013 at 20:51

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