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As much as I love mysteries in 2 am, I think its best to ask.

I'm using an onblur event to pass on "this" (e.g this = input.password). for some reason the handleServerResponse does nothing unless I add a line to it, take a look:

Normal ajax function:

function ajaxFunction(obj) 
{
    var button = document.getElementById("submit");
    button.disabled = true;
    button.setAttribute("class", "test");
    var getdate = new Date();  //Used to prevent caching during ajax call
    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange  = handleServerResponse(obj);

    if(xmlhttp) 
    {
    //var input = document.forms["signup_form"].getElementsByTagName("input");
    xmlhttp.open("POST","register_ajax.php",true);

    xmlhttp.setRequestHeader('Content-Type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded');

    xmlhttp.send(obj.name +"="+ obj.value);
    };
}

handleServerResponse - Doesn't work

function handleServerResponse(obj) 
{
    if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4)
    {
        if(xmlhttp.status == 200) 
    {
            obj.value=xmlhttp.responseText; //Update the HTML Form element 
    }
    else 
    {
        alert("Error during AJAX call. Please try again");
    }
    }
}

handleServerResponse - Work's

function handleServerResponse(obj) 
{
    alert(xmlhttp.responseText);
    if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4)
    {
        if(xmlhttp.status == 200) 
    {
            obj.value=xmlhttp.responseText; //Update the HTML Form element 
    }
    else 
    {
        alert("Error during AJAX call. Please try again");
    }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

On this line

xmlhttp.onreadystatechange  = handleServerResponse(obj);

you are calling handleServerResponse rather than setting the on readystate change handler. You have to assign a function to xmlhttp.onreadystatechange what you are doing is assigning the return of handleServerResponse(obj). Try

xmlhttp.onreadystatechange  = function(){
                                  handleServerResponse(obj);
                              };

Also the reason why the second one succeeded is because the alert blocks execution an the ajax call finished before the checks were made.

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Keep forgetting that javascript behaves different. Thanks, I can finally go to sleep. –  elad.chen Mar 9 '13 at 0:15

Your "works" accidentally works, it doesn't actually work.

What happens is:

  1. xmlhttp request is sent (reply will come at a later time).
  2. you immediately try check readyState, which is not 4 yet because isn't not ready yet!

In the other case this happens:

  1. xmlhttp request is sent (reply will come at a later time).
  2. You block the browser by using alert. While the alert is open the AJAX request returns.
  3. You immediately check readyState and now it is 4.

If you closed the alert fast enough it will break again.

The proper way to deal with AJAX (and asynchronousness in general) is to use event listeners.

xmlhttprequest.addEventListener("onreadystatechange", function (event) {
    if (xmlhttprequest.readyState === 4) {
        // handle reply
    }
});
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