11

I am wondering if there is a way I could possibly pass a field name to a function template. Consider the following:

struct Type1{
    unsigned int Field1;
    unsigned int Field2;
};

struct Type2{
    unsigned int Field2;
    unsigned int Field3;
};

template <typename TYPE>
bool MyFunction(TYPE _Type){
    if(_Type.Field1==5)
        return false;
}

This works fine, however within MyFunction I am specifying .Field1, is there a way I can pass the name of this field into a template, for example:

void TestFunction(){
    Type1 mt1;
    MyFunction(mt1, Field1);
}

Clearly, I'm not templating a type here, and I'm at a loss on what this would be called (other than the obvious answer - silly!) so I'm struggling to even search for a solution.

6
  • 3
    You may want to look into the pointer-to-member concept. Commented Mar 9, 2013 at 18:46
  • Unrelated to the question you're asking, but _Type is reserved for the implementation, so you're not allowed to use it (i.e., doing so gives undefined behavior). Commented Mar 9, 2013 at 18:46
  • @n.m. Thank you I was just about to reply I'll start searching until the answers came rolling in! :)
    – R4D4
    Commented Mar 9, 2013 at 18:47
  • 2
    @R4D4 Underscore followed by a capital letter. One underscore followed by a lower-case letter is fine – provided it’s not in the global namespace. Uh, this is complicated. ;-) Just don’t use leading underscores. Commented Mar 9, 2013 at 18:49
  • 2
    Partly -- underscore followed by capital letter is always reserved. Underscore followed by something else would be reserved in global namespace, but would be allowed here (though I'd generally recommend against it anyway). Commented Mar 9, 2013 at 18:49

2 Answers 2

17

You can't pass in pure names, because names are not part of the C++ meta-model, but you can pass pointers-to-members to your function:

template <typename TYPE, typename T>
bool MyFunction(TYPE obj, T TYPE::*mp)
//                          ^^^^^^^^^
{
    if ((obj.*mp) == 5)
//          ^^^^
        return false;

    // ... <== DON'T FORGET TO RETURN SOMETHING IN THIS CASE,
    //         OTHERWISE YOU WILL GET UNDEFINED BEHAVIOR
}

Here is how you would use it in a small, complete program:

struct Type1{
    unsigned int Field1;
    unsigned int Field2;
};

struct Type2{
    unsigned int Field2;
    unsigned int Field3;
};

int main()
{
    Type1 t1;
    Type2 t2;
    MyFunction(t1, &Type1::Field1);
    MyFunction(t2, &Type2::Field3);
}

And here is a live example.

8

You can pass a pointer-to-member:

template <typename T>
bool MyFunction(T& type, int T::*field){
    if (type.*field == 5)
        return false;
}

MyFunction(mt1, &Type1::Field1);

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