9

I want to set up Gitlab with our company's LDAP as a demo. But unfortunately I have to put in an admin password in gitlab.yml to make gitlab access the LDAP service. The problem actually is the administration, as they don't want to setup another account just for Gitlab. Is there any way to circumvent this without filling in my own password? Is there a way to make Gitlab establish the LDAP connection with only the provided user credentials?

Any ideas beside logging in as anonymous?

Already posted here.

9

I haven't tried it yet, but from the things I've build so far authenticating against LDAP and the informations from the config-file this user-account seems only to be needed when your LDAP does not support anonymous binding and searching.

So I would leave the two entries bind_dn and password commented out and try whether it works or not.

UPDATE

I've implemented LDAP-Autehntication in Gitlab and it's fairly easy.

In the gitlab.yml-file there is a section called ldap.

There you have to provide the informations to connect to your LDAP. It seems that all fields have to be given, there seems to be no fallback default! If you want to use anonymous binding for retrieval of the users DN supply an empty string for bind_dn and password. Commenting them out seems not to work! At least I got a 501 Error message.

More information can be found at https://github.com/patthoyts/gitlabhq/wiki/Setting-up-ldap-auth and (more outdated but still helpful) https://github.com/intridea/omniauth-ldap

  • This does not work at my company, as there are neither set the permissions for anonymous binding nor for searching. Playing around with the parameters only lead to error messages as gitlab can not bind and thus can not verify the existance of the provided user (as far as I know gitlab tries to get the full bind_dn at this program step). – Bubu Mar 14 '13 at 7:03
  • Then you will need a user that has the privilege to bind to the LDAP to search for the Bind-DN of the user trying to log in. There is no way around when anonymous search is not enabled. Sorry. – heiglandreas Mar 14 '13 at 15:55
  • But why would I want to search for the Bind-DN if I already know it? E.g. user test@example.com wants to login; I know, that the Bind-DN is something like "uid=test@example.com, ou=people, dc=example, dc=com" - Gitlab could exploit this optionally by default and thus enable LDAP-Login without the need of an initial bind. I can't see, why this is not the default LDAP authentication strategy. – Bubu Mar 14 '13 at 20:35
  • Because it is very common that the bindDN varies depending on the organisational unit of a user. Therefore you use an LDAP-query to find the DN of a user by searching for a unique information like an emai-address or a uid. Bit ehen you already know the DN necause of a convention them it might be possible to use omniaurh as @VonC already suggested. – heiglandreas Mar 14 '13 at 21:28
5

I have patched gitlab to work this way and documented the process in https://foivos.zakkak.net/tutorials/gitlab_ldap_auth_without_querying_account/

I shamelessly copy the instructions here for self-completeness.

Note: This tutorial was last tested with gitlab 8.2 installed from source.

This tutorial aims to describe how to modify a Gitlab installation to use the users credentials to authenticate with the LDAP server. By default Gitlab relies on anonymous binding or a special querying user to ask the LDAP server about the existence of a user before authenticating her with her own credentials. For security reasons, however, many administrators disable anonymous binding and forbid the creation of special querying LDAP users.

In this tutorial we assume that we have a gitlab setup at gitlab.example.com and an LDAP server running on ldap.example.com, and users have a DN of the following form: CN=username,OU=Users,OU=division,OU=department,DC=example,DC=com.

Patching

To make Gitlab work in such cases we need to partly modify its authentication mechanism regarding LDAP.

First, we replace the omniauth-ldap module with this derivation. To achieve this we apply the following patch to gitlab/Gemfile:

diff --git a/Gemfile b/Gemfile
index 1171eeb..f25bc60 100644
--- a/Gemfile
+++ b/Gemfile
@@ -44,4 +44,5 @@ gem 'gitlab-grack', '~> 2.0.2', require: 'grack'
 # LDAP Auth
 # GitLab fork with several improvements to original library. For full list of changes 
 # see https://github.com/intridea/omniauth-ldap/compare/master...gitlabhq:master
-gem 'gitlab_omniauth-ldap', '1.2.1', require: "omniauth-ldap"
+#gem 'gitlab_omniauth-ldap', '1.2.1', require: "omniauth-ldap"
+gem 'gitlab_omniauth-ldap', :git => 'https://github.com/zakkak/omniauth-ldap.git', require: 'net-ldap', require: "omniauth-ldap"

Now, we need to perform the following actions:

  1. sudo -u git -H bundle install --without development test mysql --path vendor/bundle --no-deployment
  2. sudo -u git -H bundle install --deployment --without development test mysql aws

These commands will fetch the modified omniauth-ldap module in gitlab/vendor/bundle/ruby/2.x.x/bundler/gems. Now that the module is fetched, we need to modify it to use the DN our LDAP server expects. We achieve this by patching lib/omniauth/strategies/ldap.rb in gitlab/vendor/bundle/ruby/2.x.x/bundler/gems/omniauth-ldap with:

diff --git a/lib/omniauth/strategies/ldap.rb b/lib/omniauth/strategies/ldap.rb
index 9ea62b4..da5e648 100644
--- a/lib/omniauth/strategies/ldap.rb
+++ b/lib/omniauth/strategies/ldap.rb
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ module OmniAuth
         return fail!(:missing_credentials) if missing_credentials?

         # The HACK!  FIXME: do it in a more generic/configurable way
-        @options[:bind_dn]  = "CN=#{request['username']},OU=Test,DC=my,DC=example,DC=com"
+        @options[:bind_dn]  = "CN=#{request['username']},OU=Users,OU=division,OU=department,DC=example,DC=com"
         @options[:password] = request['password']
         @adaptor = OmniAuth::LDAP::Adaptor.new @options

With this module, gitlab uses the user's credentials to bind to the LDAP server and query it, as well as, to authenticate the user herself.

This however will only work as long as the users do not use ssh-keys to authenticate with Gitlab. When authenticating through an ssh-key, by default Gitlab queries the LDAP server to find out whether the corresponding user is (still) a valid user or not. At this point, we cannot use the user credentials to query the LDAP server, since the user did not provide them to us. As a result we disable this mechanism, essentially allowing users with registered ssh-keys but removed from the LDAP server to still use our Gitlab setup. To prevent such users from being able to still use your Gitlab setup, you will have to manually delete their ssh-keys from any accounts in your setup.

To disable this mechanism we patch gitlab/lib/gitlab/ldap/access.rb with:

diff --git a/lib/gitlab/ldap/access.rb b/lib/gitlab/ldap/access.rb
index 16ff03c..9ebaeb6 100644
--- a/lib/gitlab/ldap/access.rb
+++ b/lib/gitlab/ldap/access.rb
@@ -14,15 +14,16 @@ module Gitlab
       end

       def self.allowed?(user)
-        self.open(user) do |access|
-          if access.allowed?
-            user.last_credential_check_at = Time.now
-            user.save
-            true
-          else
-            false
-          end
-        end
+        true
+        # self.open(user) do |access|
+        #   if access.allowed?
+        #     user.last_credential_check_at = Time.now
+        #     user.save
+        #     true
+        #   else
+        #     false
+        #   end
+        # end
       end

       def initialize(user, adapter=nil)
@@ -32,20 +33,21 @@ module Gitlab
       end

def allowed?
-        if Gitlab::LDAP::Person.find_by_dn(user.ldap_identity.extern_uid, adapter)
-          return true unless ldap_config.active_directory
+        true
+        # if Gitlab::LDAP::Person.find_by_dn(user.ldap_identity.extern_uid, adapter)
+        #   return true unless ldap_config.active_directory

-          # Block user in GitLab if he/she was blocked in AD
-          if Gitlab::LDAP::Person.disabled_via_active_directory?(user.ldap_identity.extern_uid, adapter)
-            user.block unless user.blocked?
-            false
-          else
-            user.activate if user.blocked? && !ldap_config.block_auto_created_users
-            true
-          end
-        else
-          false
-        end
+        #   # Block user in GitLab if he/she was blocked in AD
+        #   if Gitlab::LDAP::Person.disabled_via_active_directory?(user.ldap_identity.extern_uid, adapter)
+        #     user.block unless user.blocked?
+        #     false
+        #   else
+        #     user.activate if user.blocked? && !ldap_config.block_auto_created_users
+        #     true
+        #   end
+        # else
+        #   false
+        # end
rescue
false
end

Configuration

In gitlab.yml use something like the following (modify to your needs):

#
# 2. Auth settings
# ==========================

## LDAP settings
# You can inspect a sample of the LDAP users with login access by running:
#   bundle exec rake gitlab:ldap:check RAILS_ENV=production
ldap:
  enabled: true
  servers:
    ##########################################################################
    #
    # Since GitLab 7.4, LDAP servers get ID's (below the ID is 'main'). GitLab
    # Enterprise Edition now supports connecting to multiple LDAP servers.
    #
    # If you are updating from the old (pre-7.4) syntax, you MUST give your
    # old server the ID 'main'.
    #
    ##########################################################################
    main: # 'main' is the GitLab 'provider ID' of this LDAP server
      ## label
      #
      # A human-friendly name for your LDAP server. It is OK to change the label later,
      # for instance if you find out it is too large to fit on the web page.
      #
      # Example: 'Paris' or 'Acme, Ltd.'
      label: 'LDAP_EXAMPLE_COM'

      host: ldap.example.com
      port: 636
      uid: 'sAMAccountName'
      method: 'ssl' # "tls" or "ssl" or "plain"
      bind_dn: ''
      password: ''

      # This setting specifies if LDAP server is Active Directory LDAP server.
      # For non AD servers it skips the AD specific queries.
      # If your LDAP server is not AD, set this to false.
      active_directory: true

      # If allow_username_or_email_login is enabled, GitLab will ignore everything
      # after the first '@' in the LDAP username submitted by the user on login.
      #
      # Example:
      # - the user enters 'jane.doe@example.com' and 'p@ssw0rd' as LDAP credentials;
      # - GitLab queries the LDAP server with 'jane.doe' and 'p@ssw0rd'.
      #
      # If you are using "uid: 'userPrincipalName'" on ActiveDirectory you need to
      # disable this setting, because the userPrincipalName contains an '@'.
      allow_username_or_email_login: false

      # To maintain tight control over the number of active users on your GitLab installation,
      # enable this setting to keep new users blocked until they have been cleared by the admin
      # (default: false).
      block_auto_created_users: false

      # Base where we can search for users
      #
      #   Ex. ou=People,dc=gitlab,dc=example
      #
      base: 'OU=Users,OU=division,OU=department,DC=example,DC=com'

      # Filter LDAP users
      #
      #   Format: RFC 4515 http://tools.ietf.org/search/rfc4515
      #   Ex. (employeeType=developer)
      #
      #   Note: GitLab does not support omniauth-ldap's custom filter syntax.
      #
      user_filter: '(&(objectclass=user)(objectclass=person))'
1

GitLab uses omniauth to manage multiple login sources (including LDAP).

So if you can somehow extend omniauth in order to manage the LDAP connection differently, you could fetch the password from a different source.
That would allow you to avoid keeping said password in the ldap section of the gitlab.yml config file.

  • That's been my first idea, but where to go from here? I'm not really into the ruby stuff. I found this - since it seems not to use an initial bind, it does look very promising to me. Do you have other hints, where to dig? – Bubu Mar 14 '13 at 7:19
  • @Bubu no other hints right now. What you have found seems a nice example of extending omniauth, which is precisely what I suggests. – VonC Mar 14 '13 at 7:25
  • So did you ever get this to work? I'm trying to do the same thing. – orodbhen Jan 15 '15 at 17:35
  • @DJon No, I didn't get to make this work, as I hadn't that precise feature to support. – VonC Jan 15 '15 at 19:36

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