31

I have those two models:

models.py

class App(models.Model):
    app_name = models.SlugField(max_length=50)
    options_loaded = models.ManyToManyField(Option)
    created_by = models.ForeignKey(User)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

class Option(models.Model):
    option_name = models.SlugField(max_length=50)
    condition = models.BooleanField('Enable condition')
    option = models.BooleanField('Enable option1')
    created_by = models.ForeignKey(User)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.option_name

I would like to render a form that would look like this, where checkboxes are from different models (first column from the M2M field with CheckboxSelectMultiple() widget), and Option_name could be <a href="/link/">Option_name</a>

enter image description here

Is it possible?

5
  • 3
    +1 Very good I never think of that – catherine Mar 10 '13 at 15:16
  • try to put bounty so someone will have the interest to answer it. I can't offered bounty, no link. – catherine Mar 11 '13 at 3:18
  • I can put a bounty but cannot give a big reward... – Below the Radar Mar 12 '13 at 13:37
  • Try to offer higher bounty. I will give you upvote in your question so that you can gain more reputation – catherine Mar 14 '13 at 0:19
  • 1
    You have a fundamental data modeling issue. Option's bool fields can only be filled out once. In order to use bool fields to model this, the bool fields need to be in a through model that relates the app to option. – Francis Yaconiello Mar 16 '13 at 23:19
36

This is my simple solution: render CheckboxSelectMultiple() manually in template

<table>
<thead>
  <tr>
    <td>&nbsp;</td>
    <td>V</td>
    <td>S</td>
  </tr>
</thead>    
{% for pk, choice in form.options.field.widget.choices %}
<tr>
  <td><a href="/link/{{ choice }}">{{ choice }}</a></td>
  <td>
    <label for="id_options_{{ forloop.counter0 }}">
      <input {% for m2moption in model.m2moptions.all %}{% if option.pk == pk %}checked="checked"{% endif %}{% endfor %} type="checkbox" id="id_options_{{ forloop.counter0 }}" value="{{ pk }}" name="options" />
    </label>
  </td>
</tr>
{% endfor %}                
</table>
5
  • I know this is an old post but i bumped into a similar problem and your solution saved my day. I have a question for you and i was wondering if you could help me. I have a form that i use to edit a model and it seems like by using your solution all of the checkboxes start unchecked not bounding to whatever was checked in the model. Do you have any idea why? Thank you. – user2466766 Jun 25 '16 at 16:49
  • Maybe you are using a new Django version which is not fully compatible with this solution. In the code above, the part that is managing the checked state of the checkboxes is: {% for option in app.options.all %}{% if option.pk == pk %}checked="checked"{% endif %}{% endfor %} – Below the Radar Jun 27 '16 at 12:06
  • 1
    Thanks for your time. I got it working. I misinterpreted the ´{% for option in app.options.all %}´. Maybe it should be ´{% for m2moption in model.m2moptions.all %}´. Thanks once again. Your solution is great. – user2466766 Jun 27 '16 at 21:49
  • Good idea, it will be more clear with your suggestion. – Below the Radar Jun 28 '16 at 13:57
  • Thanks for this solution. For those who ended up here looking for a standard way to render CheckboxSelectMultiple() manually, I have added another answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/42152304/1526703 to do it that way (using HTML lists - the way Django renders it) – Anupam Feb 10 '17 at 5:48
13
+25

http://dev.yaconiello.com/playground/example/one/

Firstly, I'd restructure your models like so. The way you are currently set up, the option/app checkbox relationship would behave poorly. Each Option would only be able to have a single boolean checked value that it shared with ALL App objects.

models

from django.db import models
from django.utils.translation import ugettext as _

class Option(models.Model):
    condition = models.CharField(
        verbose_name = _(u'Condition Text'),
        max_length = 255,
    )
    option = models.CharField(
        verbose_name = _(u'Option Text'),
        max_length = 255,
    )

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.condition


class App(models.Model):
    title = models.CharField(
        verbose_name = _(u'App Name'), 
        max_length = 255
    )
    slug = models.SlugField(
        max_length = 50,
        unique = True
    )
    activated = models.BooleanField(
        verbose_name = _(u'Activated'),
        default = False,
    )
    options = models.ManyToManyField(
        Option,
        through="AppOption"
    )

    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.title


class AppOption(models.Model):
    app = models.ForeignKey(
        App,
        verbose_name = _(u'App'), 
    )
    option = models.ForeignKey(
        Option,
        verbose_name = _(u'Option'), 
    )
    condition_activated = models.BooleanField(
        verbose_name = _(u'Condition Activated'),
        default = False,
    )
    option_activated = models.BooleanField(
        verbose_name = _(u'Option Activated'),
        default = False,
    )

    class Meta:
        unique_together = (("app", "option"),)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return "%s %s (%s | %s | %s)" % (self.app, self.option, self.app.activated, self.option_activated, self.condition_activated)

secondly, you should use model formsets and model forms with custom logics inside...

forms

from django.forms.models import modelformset_factory
from django import forms

class AppOptionForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = AppOption
        fields = ("app", "option", "condition_activated", "option_activated")

AppOptionFormSet = modelformset_factory(AppOption, form=AppOptionForm)

class AppForm(forms.ModelForm):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(AppForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

        if self.instance:
            self.appoptions_prefix = "appoptions-%s"%self.instance.pk
            self.appoptions_formset = AppOptionFormSet(prefix=self.appoptions_prefix, 
                queryset=AppOption.objects.filter(app=self.instance).order_by('option'))

    class Meta:
        model = App
        fields = ("id", "activated",)

AppFormSet = modelformset_factory(App, form=AppForm)

Ok so what just happened is we created a modelform for AppOption and then turned it into a modelformset.

THEN, we created a modelform for App that has an overridden init method that instantiates an AppOption formset for the App model form's instance.

Lastly, we created a modelformset using the App modelform.

this is a view that saves all of the apps and appoptions

def one(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        formset = AppFormSet(request.POST, prefix="apps") # do some magic to ALSO apply POST to inner formsets
        if formset.is_valid(): # do some magic to ALSO validate inner formsets
            for form in formset.forms:
                # saved App Instances
                form.save()
                for innerform in form.appoptions_formset:
                    # saved AppOption instances
                    innerform.save()
    else:
        formset = AppFormSet(prefix="apps")

    options = Option.objects.all()

    return render(
        request,
        "playground/example/one.html",
        {
            'formset' : formset,
            'options' : options,
        }
    )

template

this is a test
<style>
thead td {
    width: 50px;
    height: 100px;
}
.vertical {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-90deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-90deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-90deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-90deg);
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=3);
}
</style>
<form>
<table>
<thead>
    <tr>
        <td>&nbsp;</td>
        <td><p class="vertical">Activate App</p></td>
        {% for option in options %}
        <td><p class="vertical">{{ option.condition }}</p></td>
        <td><p class="vertical">{{ option.option }}</p></td>
        {% endfor %}
    </tr>
</thead>
{% for form in formset.forms %}
    {% if form.instance.pk %}
    <tr>
        <td align="center">{{ form.instance.title }}{{ form.id.as_hidden }}</td>
        <td align="center">{{ form.activated }}</td>
        {% for optionform in form.appoptions_formset.forms %}
        {% if optionform.instance.pk %}
        <td align="center">
            {{ optionform.app.as_hidden }}
            {{ optionform.app.as_hidden }}
            {{ optionform.condition_activated }}
        </td>
        <td align="center">{{ optionform.option_activated }}</td>
        {% endif %}
        {% endfor %}
    </tr>
    {% endif %}
{% endfor %}
</table>
</form>
1
  • Note: everywhere I wrote # do some magic... you are going to need to write the code to do those things or submitting this example won't work. I hopefully got you far enough along that you can finish this up – Francis Yaconiello Mar 13 '13 at 16:17
6

For those who came here looking to render CheckBoxMultipleSelect manually but in the standard way (the way Django does, using HTML lists), the following is what I came up with (@below-the-radar's solution helped me achieve it)

<ul id="id_{{field.name}}">
  {% for pk, choice in field.field.widget.choices %}
    <li>
      <label for="id_{{field.name}}_{{ forloop.counter0 }}">
      <input id="id_{{field.name}}_{{ forloop.counter0 }}" name="{{field.name}}" type="checkbox" value="{{pk}}" />
      {{ choice }}
      </label>
    </li>
  {% endfor %}
</ul>
1
  • 2
    Although this doesn't answer the OPs question, it was exactly what I was looking for. – Aidan Sep 27 '17 at 2:50

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