209

I would like to cleanly filter a dataframe using regex on one of the columns.

For a contrived example:

In [210]: foo = pd.DataFrame({'a' : [1,2,3,4], 'b' : ['hi', 'foo', 'fat', 'cat']})
In [211]: foo
Out[211]: 
   a    b
0  1   hi
1  2  foo
2  3  fat
3  4  cat

I want to filter the rows to those that start with f using a regex. First go:

In [213]: foo.b.str.match('f.*')
Out[213]: 
0    []
1    ()
2    ()
3    []

That's not too terribly useful. However this will get me my boolean index:

In [226]: foo.b.str.match('(f.*)').str.len() > 0
Out[226]: 
0    False
1     True
2     True
3    False
Name: b

So I could then do my restriction by:

In [229]: foo[foo.b.str.match('(f.*)').str.len() > 0]
Out[229]: 
   a    b
1  2  foo
2  3  fat

That makes me artificially put a group into the regex though, and seems like maybe not the clean way to go. Is there a better way to do this?

3
  • 5
    If you're not wedded to regexes, foo[foo.b.str.startswith("f")] will work.
    – DSM
    Mar 10 '13 at 17:31
  • IMHO I think foo[foo.b.str.match('(f.*)').str.len() > 0] is a pretty good enough solution! More customizable and useful than startswith because it packs the versatility of regex in it. Nov 10 '15 at 1:39
  • 4
    this might be a bit late but in newer versions of pandas, the problem is fixed. the line foo[foo.b.str.match('f.*')] works in pandas 0.24.2 for me. Jul 6 '19 at 11:22
230

Use contains instead:

In [10]: df.b.str.contains('^f')
Out[10]: 
0    False
1     True
2     True
3    False
Name: b, dtype: bool
4
  • 12
    How can the boolean be inverted? Found it: stackoverflow.com/questions/15998188/…
    – dmeu
    Apr 14 '14 at 14:31
  • 5
    Is it possible to get only those rows having True?
    – shockwave
    Aug 23 '18 at 13:20
  • 4
    @shockwave you should use: df.loc[df.b.str.contains('^f'), :]
    – Rafa
    Oct 16 '18 at 13:48
  • 3
    @shockwave Also you can just use df[df.b.str.contains('^f'), :]
    – David Jung
    Nov 5 '18 at 1:39
34

There is already a string handling function Series.str.startswith(). You should try foo[foo.b.str.startswith('f')].

Result:

    a   b
1   2   foo
2   3   fat

I think what you expect.

Alternatively you can use contains with regex option. For example:

foo[foo.b.str.contains('oo', regex= True, na=False)]

Result:

    a   b
1   2   foo

na=False is to prevent Errors in case there is nan, null etc. values

2
  • I modified to this and it worked for me df[~df.CITY.str.contains('~.*', regex= True, na=False)]
    – Patty Jula
    Jan 22 '20 at 18:35
  • Thank you! this is a great solution Jun 5 '20 at 19:39
21

It may be a bit late, but this is now easier to do in Pandas by calling Series.str.match. The docs explain the difference between match, fullmatch and contains.

Note that in order to use the results for indexing, set the na=False argument (or True if you want to include NANs in the results).

20

Multiple column search with dataframe:

frame[frame.filename.str.match('*.'+MetaData+'.*') & frame.file_path.str.match('C:\test\test.txt')]
2
  • 2
    frame? and 'C:\test\test.txt'? Seems like you are answering a different question. Jun 26 '15 at 17:16
  • frame is df. its related to the same question, but it answers how to filter multiple columns('filename' and 'file_path') in one line code. Jun 29 '15 at 16:17
15

Thanks for the great answer @user3136169, here is an example of how that might be done also removing NoneType values.

def regex_filter(val):
    if val:
        mo = re.search(regex,val)
        if mo:
            return True
        else:
            return False
    else:
        return False

df_filtered = df[df['col'].apply(regex_filter)]

You can also add regex as an arg:

def regex_filter(val,myregex):
    ...

df_filtered = df[df['col'].apply(res_regex_filter,regex=myregex)]
1
  • 1
    thanks, because of this I figured out a way to filter a column by arbitrary predicate.
    – jman
    Dec 10 '19 at 1:40
11

Write a Boolean function that checks the regex and use apply on the column

foo[foo['b'].apply(regex_function)]
1

Using str slice

foo[foo.b.str[0]=='f']
Out[18]: 
   a    b
1  2  foo
2  3  fat

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