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I don't know what I'm doing wrong; But somehow .toUpperCase() String-function is not working on my browser or do I get something wrong?

var string ="kjsdgfiIJHBVSFIU";
string.toUpperCase();
console.log(string);

Live demo

3

9 Answers 9

29

.toUpperCase returns the upper-cased string. It is not an in-place modifier method.

string = string.toUpperCase();

Documentation: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/String/toUpperCase

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  • Thanks. It helped me today. I was trying this : typeof('a').toUpperCase() and toUpperCase was not working. I tried wrapping the inital result with String(...).toUpperCase() and it worked. Strings are immutable. Thanks!
    – Arjee
    May 6, 2020 at 20:07
  • Hello. sorry this is 12 years later comment. How can one know when is or not a in-place modifier method? Is there any way to know it?
    – Germán
    Sep 17, 2020 at 12:24
  • @Germán unfortunately, there's no way to know this. You just have to look up the documentation on that method to experiment with it, or test it out. Most JavaScript core methods don't modify in-place, but there are a few like Array.sort that do. Sep 17, 2020 at 19:39
  • Well... That makes programming a bit more confusing and time-consuming. I wonder why isn't there a standardisation about these kind of things.
    – Germán
    Sep 18, 2020 at 9:38
8

String is Immutable. Once created, a string object can not be modified.

So here toUpperCase returns a new string, This should work-

var string ="kjsdgfiIJHBVSFIU";
var newString = string.toUpperCase();
alert(newString);
3

toUpperCase returns the new string, so you must write:

string = string.toUpperCase();

In many languages, strings are immutable, meaning that they can not be modified once created. While this costs in efficiency, it is important for object oriented programming, because if a String passed by reference to a function was modifiable, the state of objects could be changed without the object's consent.

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var upperCase = string.toUpperCase();
console.log(upperCase);

toUpperCase doesn't transform existing string, it just returns a uppercase string.

0
1
var string ="kjsdgfiIJHBVSFIU";
string = string.toUpperCase();
console.log(string);
1
  • Couple you please provide further information and explanation of this to help the question asker? Thanks!
    – Impurity
    Sep 13, 2018 at 2:41
1

Previous answers about Strings being immutable are great! Here is just another potential run-time reason for getting this error which might be hard to spot at first. It does not detract from any of the above valid answers:

If the object on which the .toUpperCase() method is invoked is not a String, then the runtime doesn't 'find' the method toUpperCase() since that method/function only exists on String objects.

e.g. console.log(variableName.toUpperCase());

If variableName is of the type String, it works fine. If it is of another type (that does not have a toUpperCase() method, it says 'toUpperCase() is not a function (since it isn't).

If you know it should be a string, you can cast it like this:

console.log(String(variableName).toUppercase());

Hope it helps.

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I didn't know that string is unchangeable unless your reassign it with new name

console.log(i, 'is a ' + typeof i);
var N = i.toUpperCase();
console.log(N);
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  • that's not right as you can see in the other answers.
    – Homungus
    Jun 8, 2020 at 9:44
  • Well. to think of it as per the documentation, he missed to reassign the variable value. That means that even if he used the toUpperCase, it does not alter the original value stored to the string variable.
    – Jericho
    Oct 17, 2021 at 14:56
1
  • You missed to hold the updated data in string key
  • It's not a good convention to have name like string can be upperCaseString or newString or updatedString. That might be for testing purpose but try to follow good convention :) It Will help in future.
var string ="kjsdgfiIJHBVSFIU";
string = string.toUpperCase();
console.log(string);

// Output:
KJSDGFIIJHBVSFIU
0

Convert to string value to toUpperCase And toLowercase then object with method().

var string ="kjsdgfiIJHBVSFIU";

console.log(string.toUpperCase());
1
  • How does this address the issue from question?
    – barbsan
    Jul 1, 2019 at 7:08

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