95

How to loop through a collection that supports IEnumerable?

0
162

A regular for each will do:

foreach (var item in collection)
{
    // do your stuff   
}
3
  • This is faster than .ElementAt(). Unfortunately, my vote is locked in on Alexa's answer so I can't undo it but this is the best answer. +1 – Leo Gurdian Nov 22 '16 at 17:24
  • So how do you then fix "Possible multiple enumeration of IEnumerable"? – SharpC Jun 20 '19 at 9:19
  • 1
    @SharpC: the easiest way is to pull out the result into a List<T> or an array, and then pass that to the various places that needs to iterate over it. This guarantees that the (potentially expensive) enumeration of the result happens only once, but at the cost of storing the result in memory. My first step would be to find out whether the multiple enumeration actually is a problem or not. – Fredrik Mörk Jun 20 '19 at 13:53
95

Along with the already suggested methods of using a foreach loop, I thought I'd also mention that any object that implements IEnumerable also provides an IEnumerator interface via the GetEnumerator method. Although this method is usually not necessary, this can be used for manually iterating over collections, and is particularly useful when writing your own extension methods for collections.

IEnumerable<T> mySequence;
using (var sequenceEnum = mySequence.GetEnumerator())
{
    while (sequenceEnum.MoveNext())
    {
        // Do something with sequenceEnum.Current.
    }
}

A prime example is when you want to iterate over two sequences concurrently, which is not possible with a foreach loop.

3
  • 7
    Don't forget to dispose the enumerator. – Eric Lippert Oct 7 '09 at 17:14
  • @Eric: Yep, I'll add that in because it's easy to miss. – Noldorin Oct 7 '09 at 17:16
  • 1
    I think that will only work for IEnumerable<T> objects and not for IEnumerable. I had a generic case in which I had to cast to IEnumerable and, therefore, I didn't have the GetEnumerator method available. Nice for most cases anyway. – Fabio Milheiro Jun 18 '15 at 16:05
52

or even a very classic old fashion method

IEnumerable<string> collection = new List<string>() { "a", "b", "c" };

for(int i = 0; i < collection.Count(); i++) 
{
    string str1 = collection.ElementAt(i);
    // do your stuff   
}

maybe you would like this method also :-)

8
  • 9
    Why does this have so many upvotes? This will enumerate the enumerable 2n times instead of once. – Roman Reiner Oct 27 '16 at 7:33
  • 1
    @RomanReiner because this works, some people don't bother about the performance :) – Khateeb321 Nov 17 '16 at 14:53
  • @RomanReiner this is good example,i need to assign each element of one Collection to another collection,i think i cant do this using foreach – AminM Feb 18 '17 at 12:50
  • 1
    If you look at the implementation of ElementAt you will find out that if the collection is a IList they return the element at the index using []; so same performance as [], however; if not, they will get Enumerator and start an iteration sequentially looking for the element before returning it, so basically for each element they create a new enumerator and navigate the list again... – Israel Garcia May 30 '17 at 22:13
  • 1
    It's worse than all that, IEnumerable doesn't support Count() or ElementAt(). I think he's thinking of an IList. This doesn't actually answer the question at all. – krowe Mar 16 '19 at 6:41
8
foreach (var element in instanceOfAClassThatImplelemntIEnumerable)
{

}
-1

Maybe you forgot the await before returning your collection

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.