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I have three tables {animal, food, animal_food}

DROP   TABLE IF EXISTS `tbl_animal`; 
CREATE TABLE `tbl_animal` (
    id_animal       INTEGER     NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
    name            VARCHAR(25) NOT NULL DEFAULT "no name",
    sex             CHAR(1)     NOT NULL DEFAULT "M",
    size            VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL DEFAULT "Mini",
    age             VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL DEFAULT "born",
    hair            VARCHAR(5 ) NOT NULL DEFAULT "short",
    color           VARCHAR(25) NOT NULL DEFAULT "not defined",
    FOREIGN KEY (sex)           REFERENCES `tbl_sexes`    (sex),
    FOREIGN KEY (tamanio)       REFERENCES `tbl_sizes`    (size),
    FOREIGN KEY (age)           REFERENCES `tbl_ages`     (age),
    FOREIGN KEY (hair)          REFERENCES `tbl_hair_length` (hair_length),
    CONSTRAINT `uc_Info_Animal` UNIQUE (`id_animal`)           
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;




DROP    TABLE IF EXISTS `tbl_food`; 
CREATE TABLE `tbl_food` (
    id_food       INTEGER       NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    type_food     VARCHAR(20)   NOT NULL DEFAULT "Other",
    label         VARCHAR(50)   NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT `uc_Info_Food`   UNIQUE  (`id_food`)     
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;


DROP    TABLE IF EXISTS `animal_food`; 
CREATE  TABLE `animal_food` (
    id_animal       INTEGER     NOT NULL,
    food            VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT "",
    quantity        VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT "",        
    times           VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT "",
    description     VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL DEFAULT "",            
    date_last   DATE DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',     
    date_water      DATE DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
    CONSTRAINT fk_ID_Animal_Food FOREIGN KEY (id_animal) REFERENCES `tbl_animal`(id_animal)  
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

And I have a view where I select the values columns in animal and animal_food depending on ID

CREATE VIEW `CAT_animal_food` AS
       SELECT a.name, a.sex,a.size,a.age,a.hair,a.color,
              a_f.*  
       FROM  `tbl_animal` a, `animal_food` a_f
       WHERE a.id_animal = a_f.id_animal;

What would be better to create a view like above or, to join these animal and animal_food tables?

SELECT ...
  FROM A.table t1
  JOIN B.table2 t2 ON t2.column = t1.col

What is really the diference between that kind of view and a left join for example?

1

The only difference between the two SELECT statements is the syntax style. Both perform INNER JOINS. In other words, this style uses what is called "implicit" syntax:

SELECT ...
  FROM A.table t1, B.table2 t2
  WHERE t2.column = t1.col

It is "implicit" because the join condition is implied by the WHERE clause. This version uses "explicit" syntax:

SELECT ...
  FROM A.table t1
  JOIN B.table2 t2 ON t2.column = t1.col

Most people prefer to see "explicit" syntax because it make your code easier to follow; the join condition is explicitly understood and any WHERE clause is obvious.

None of this is related to LEFT JOINS of course. Here is a famous link with a great visual description of join types.

  • I added left join as I am controlling what I want from animal table... – cMinor Mar 11 '13 at 0:10
-1

There is a big difference.

The old school style using a list of tables only allows inner joins.

Further, placing non-key conditions in the ON clause of a proper join allows greater performance and capability that a where clause can not deliver. The primary reason for this is that the ON clause is evaluated as the join is being made, but the WHERE clause is evaluated after all joins have been made.

The subject is too complex to do justice here.

  • 1
    Does f aliased mean something or is it a typo? And I'm guessing this WHERE clause behavior (happening after all joins made) is particular to MySQL, correct? – BellevueBob Mar 11 '13 at 0:25
  • @BobDuell oops typo - it was meant to be evaluated (fixed now, no thanks to iPhone auto-correct). And "No" - this behaviour is true for all databases. The WHERE clause filters the result set. The ON clause controls the join. There are some queries that can only be achieved using conditions in the ON clause. – Bohemian Mar 11 '13 at 1:23
  • Why the downvotes? – Bohemian Mar 11 '13 at 20:02
  • 2
    @Bohemian: because the part: "a proper join allows greater performance and capability that a where clause can not deliver" is plainly wrong. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 12 '13 at 21:44
  • 1
    My objection is related to performance alone and to MySQL in particular. But which other DBMS are you referring to, that can't optimize this, I'm really curious. In all other matters, I agree with you. I am definitely in favour of the explicit JOIN synatx. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Mar 12 '13 at 22:04

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