67

I must say I have never had cause to use bitwise operators, but I am sure there are some operations that I have performed that would have been more efficiently done with them. How have "shifting" and "OR-ing" helped you solve a problem more efficiently?

  • Would you mind to change your accepted answer to choose CS's answer? – Xam Sep 12 '18 at 23:21
  • @Xam - CS's answer came in almost 4 yrs after Martin's and it was instructive to me at the time I needed it. So on principle I won't change it, but CS and Mohasin both benefit from the upvotes that make their answers more popular than Martin's. – non sequitor Sep 22 '18 at 19:51

11 Answers 11

45

See the famous Bit Twiddling Hacks
Most of the multiply/divide ones are unnecessary - the compiler will do that automatically and you will just confuse people.

But there are a bunch of, 'check/set/toggle bit N' type hacks that are very useful if you work with hardware or communications protocols.

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141
+100

Using bitwise operations on strings (characters)

Convert letter to lowercase:

  • OR by space => (x | ' ')
  • Result is always lowercase even if letter is already lowercase
  • eg. ('a' | ' ') => 'a' ; ('A' | ' ') => 'a'

Convert letter to uppercase:

  • AND by underline => (x & '_')
  • Result is always uppercase even if letter is already uppercase
  • eg. ('a' & '_') => 'A' ; ('A' & '_') => 'A'

Invert letter's case:

  • XOR by space => (x ^ ' ')
  • eg. ('a' ^ ' ') => 'A' ; ('A' ^ ' ') => 'a'

Letter's position in alphabet:

  • AND by chr(31)/binary('11111')/(hex('1F') => (x & "\x1F")
  • Result is in 1..26 range, letter case is not important
  • eg. ('a' & "\x1F") => 1 ; ('B' & "\x1F") => 2

Get letter's position in alphabet (for Uppercase letters only):

  • AND by ? => (x & '?') or XOR by @ => (x ^ '@')
  • eg. ('C' & '?') => 3 ; ('Z' ^ '@') => 26

Get letter's position in alphabet (for lowercase letters only):

  • XOR by backtick/chr(96)/binary('1100000')/hex('60') => (x ^ '`')
  • eg. ('d' ^ '`') => 4 ; ('x' ^ '`') => 25

Note: using anything other than the english letters will produce garbage results

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  • 3
    How did you know i would be interested .... :) – Baba Apr 23 '13 at 18:41
  • @Ka: Does this works in javascript too? I tried these in firebug's console but I always got 0. – Razort4x May 6 '13 at 7:01
  • 6
    @Razort4x it works in JS via fromCharCode and charCodeAt. eg. String.fromCharCode("a".charCodeAt(0) & 95); – CSᵠ May 7 '13 at 10:13
64

  • Bitwise operations on integers(int)

Get the maximum integer

int maxInt = ~(1 << 31);
int maxInt = (1 << 31) - 1;
int maxInt = (1 << -1) - 1;

Get the minimum integer

int minInt = 1 << 31;
int minInt = 1 << -1;

Get the maximum long

long maxLong = ((long)1 << 127) - 1;

Multiplied by 2

n << 1; // n*2

Divided by 2

n >> 1; // n/2

Multiplied by the m-th power of 2

n << m; // (3<<5) ==>3 * 2^5 ==> 96

Divided by the m-th power of 2

n >> m; // (20>>2) ==>(20/( 2^2) ==> 5

Check odd number

(n & 1) == 1;

Exchange two values

a ^= b;
b ^= a;
a ^= b;

Get absolute value

(n ^ (n >> 31)) - (n >> 31);

Get the max of two values

b & ((a-b) >> 31) | a & (~(a-b) >> 31);

Get the min of two values

a & ((a-b) >> 31) | b & (~(a-b) >> 31);

Check whether both have the same sign

(x ^ y) >= 0;

Calculate 2^n

2 << (n-1);

Whether is factorial of 2

n > 0 ? (n & (n - 1)) == 0 : false;

Modulo 2^n against m

m & (n - 1);

Get the average

(x + y) >> 1;
((x ^ y) >> 1) + (x & y);

Get the m-th bit of n (from low to high)

(n >> (m-1)) & 1;

Set the m-th bit of n to 0 (from low to high)

n & ~(1 << (m-1));

n + 1

-~n

n - 1

~-n

Get the contrast number

~n + 1;
(n ^ -1) + 1; 

if (x==a) x=b; if (x==b) x=a;

x = a ^ b ^ x;
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  • Math.floor() === x >> 0 and Math.ceil() === y | 1 as well – newshorts Jun 12 '17 at 23:12
  • From what I know, Bitwise operators are for integers and characters only and not for real valued types. You use Math.floor or Math.ceil with real valued numbers not integers. – Shashank Avusali Jul 18 '17 at 15:19
  • what's the point of doing if (x==a) x=b; if (x==b) x=a;? it's just equivalent to if (x == b) x = a;. And the term for contrast number is the negated value or the two's complement, which could be easier done with -n – phuclv Aug 18 '18 at 4:44
  • @phuclv I think these operations are very useful when you are doing operations in low-level languages. Instead of writing complex 'if-else' and branching logic in low-level language, it becomes easy to implement the logic this way. – BraveNinja Dec 14 '18 at 3:19
  • @BraveNinja there's no complex if-else here. Only a single compare then jump is needed, or no jump at all if the architecture has conditional move. Moreover it's not quite a useful trick since it may actually be slower than normal assignments due to dependencies – phuclv Dec 14 '18 at 5:34
14

There's only three that I've ever used with any frequency:

  1. Set a bit: a |= 1 << bit;

  2. Clear a bit: a &= ~(1 << bit);

  3. Test that a bit is set: a & (1 << bit);

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9

Matters Computational: Ideas, Algorithms, Source Code, by Jorg Arndt (PDF). This book contains tons of stuff, I found it via a link at http://www.hackersdelight.org/

Average without overflow

A routine for the computation of the average (x + y)/2 of two arguments x and y is

static inline ulong average(ulong x, ulong y)
// Return floor( (x+y)/2 )
// Use: x+y == ((x&y)<<1) + (x^y)
// that is: sum == carries + sum_without_carries
{
    return (x & y) + ((x ^ y) >> 1);
}
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  • Thanks for the book Link ! – Debashish Dec 26 '16 at 23:12
2

You can compress data, e.g. a collection of integers:

  • See which integer values appear more frequently in the collection
  • Use short bit-sequences to represent the values which appear more frequently (and longer bit-sequences to represent the values which appear less frequently)
  • Concatenate the bits-sequences: so for example, the first 3 bits in the resulting bit stream might represent one integer, then the next 9 bits another integer, etc.
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1

1) Divide/Multiply by a power of 2

foo >>= x; (divide by power of 2)

foo <<= x; (multiply by power of 2)

2) Swap

x ^= y;
y = x ^ y;
x ^= y;
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  • It'd be interesting to see benchmarks demonstrating whether those are actually faster than the normal way on modern compilers. – sepp2k Oct 7 '09 at 18:04
  • I'd be pretty confident the shift is faster. The swap is more about not needing additional memory than being faster. – Taylor Leese Oct 7 '09 at 18:16
  • 10
    @Taylor: Most modern compilers will use a shift when it's the fastest way, without you having to manually code it. – Ken White Oct 7 '09 at 18:33
1

I used bitwise operators to efficiently implement distance calculations for bitstrings. In my application bitstrings were used to represent positions in a discretised space (an octree, if you're interested, encoded with Morton ordering). The distance calculations were needed to know whether points on the grid fell within a particular radius.

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1

Counting set bits, finding lowest/highest set bit, finding nth-from-top/bottom set bit and others can be useful, and it's worth looking at the bit-twiddling hacks site.

That said, this kind of thing isn't day-to-day important. Useful to have a library, but even then the most common uses are indirect (e.g. using a bitset container). Also, ideally, these would be standard library functions - a lot of them are better handled using specialise CPU instructions on some platforms.

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0

While multiplying/dividing by shifting seems nifty, the only thing I needed once in a while was compressing booleans into bits. For that you need bitwise AND/OR, and probably bit shifting/inversion.

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0

I wanted a function to round numbers to the next highest power of two, so I visited the Bit Twiddling website that's been brought up several times and came up with this:

i--;
i |= i >> 1;
i |= i >> 2;
i |= i >> 4;
i |= i >> 8;
i |= i >> 16;
i++;

I use it on a size_t type. It probably won't play well on signed types. If you're worried about portability to platforms with different sized types, sprinkle your code with #if SIZE_MAX >= (number) directives in appropriate places.

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