28

How to convert a String without separator to an ArrayList<Character>.

My String is like this:

String str = "abcd..."

I know one way of doing this is converting the String to char[] first, and then convert the char [] to ArrayList <Character>.

Is there any better way to do this? like converting directly? Considering time and performance, because I am coding with a big database.

5
  • So...do you want to take the implicit string and convert each character in it to a collection of some sort? If that's the case, what have you tried? Some sample code would be beneficial.
    – Makoto
    Mar 11, 2013 at 5:18
  • Do you really want to convert to ArrayList or just wrap string into List backed by the original string? Mar 11, 2013 at 5:18
  • @Makoto I have tried 'char [] chars = str.toCharArray (); ArrayList <Character> mylist = new ArrayList <Character> (); for (char c : chars) mylist.add (c);'
    – Pan Long
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:25
  • @MikhailVladimirov I really want to convert it to ArrayList
    – Pan Long
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:26
  • @squiguy As I mentioned below, your code seems not working.
    – Pan Long
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:27

7 Answers 7

19

You need to add it like this.

String str = "abcd...";
ArrayList<Character> chars = new ArrayList<Character>();
for (char c : str.toCharArray()) {
  chars.add(c);
}
4
  • Well. I don't think it works. str.toCharArray () will return char [], while you are assigning it to an ArrayList with type Character. To be more precise, you cannot convert an array of primitives to an ArrayList like this.
    – Pan Long
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:21
  • This should work :), but as I mentioned, you converted the string to a char array first, and then added it one by one to get the ArrayList. I am considering the space and time costs while the string is very large and the number of strings is also huge in a database.
    – Pan Long
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:38
  • @aga_pan Hmm, well unless you venture off into some third party libraries, I am not sure there is a way around it. Beats me at least!
    – squiguy
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:41
  • @aga_pan In the end, the efficiency of a loop to compiled byte code will be optimized by the virtual machine I am sure. The only way to find out would be to choose some methods and play around with it.
    – squiguy
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:42
7

Sorry for the Retrobump, but this is now really easy!

You can do this easily in Java 8 using Streams! Try this:

String string = "testingString";
List<Character> list = string.chars().mapToObj((i) -> Character.valueOf((char)i)).collect(Collectors.toList());
System.out.println(list);

You need to use mapToObj because chars() returns an IntStream.

1
  • Error:(13, 114) java: incompatible types: inference variable R has incompatible bounds equality constraints: java.util.List<java.lang.Character> upper bounds: java.util.ArrayList<java.lang.Character>,java.lang.Object
    – Leder
    Aug 16, 2019 at 4:45
7

use lambda expression to do this.

String big_data = "big-data";
ArrayList<Character> chars
        = new ArrayList<>(
                 big_data.chars()
                .mapToObj(e -> (char) e)
                .collect(
                        Collectors.toList()
                )
        );    
5

If you dn not need to modify list after it created, probably the better way would be to wrap string into class implementing List<Character> interface like this:

import java.util.AbstractList;
import java.util.List;

public class StringCharacterList extends AbstractList <Character>
{
    private final String string;

    public StringCharacterList (String string)
    {
        this.string = string;
    }

    @Override
    public Character get (int index)
    {
        return Character.valueOf (string.charAt (index));
    }

    @Override
    public int size ()
    {
        return string.length ();
    }
}

And then use this class like this:

List <Character> l = new StringCharacterList ("Hello, World!");
System.out.println (l);
1
  • 1
    Thanks, but what I need is an ArrayList :)
    – Pan Long
    Mar 11, 2013 at 6:29
2
public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        String str = "abcd...";
        ArrayList<Character> a=new ArrayList<Character>();
        for(int i=0;i<str.length();i++)
        {
            a.add(str.charAt(i));

        }
        System.out.println(a);
    }
0
0

you can do it like this:

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class YourClass{

    public static void main(String [] args){

        ArrayList<Character> char = new ArrayList<Character>();
        String str = "abcd...";

        for (int x = 0; x < str.length(); x ++){
            char.add(str.charAt(x));
        }
    }
}
0
0
String myString = "xxx";
ArrayList<Character> myArrayList = myString.chars().mapToObj(x -> (char) x).collect(toCollection(ArrayList::new));
myArrayList.forEach(System.out::println);

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