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Can somebody explain this?

1 == 1        //true, as expected
1 === 1       //true, as expected
1 == 1 == 1   //true, as expected
1 == 1 == 2   //false, as expected
1 === 1 === 2 //false, as expected
1 === 1 === 1 //false? <--

Also is there a name for boolean logic that compares more than two numbers in this way (I called it "three-variable comparison" but I think that'd be wrong...)

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This expression:

1 === 1 === 1

Is evaluated as:

(1 === 1) === 1

After evaluating the expression inside parentheses:

true === 1

And that expression is logically false. The below expression returns true as expected though:

1 === 1 === true
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  • 1
    Haha, should have tested more: 5 == 5 == 5 is also false, but because 1 == true I was getting tripped up using my example of 1 == 1 == 1. +1 thanks! – user1318194 Mar 11 '13 at 5:52
  • One more question: can I do what I want to do without a tedious expression (such as x === y && y === z && x === z)? – user1318194 Mar 11 '13 at 5:57
  • @DuncanNZ Are there always three variables involved? – Ja͢ck Mar 11 '13 at 5:59
  • yes - basically I need to check that 3 strings are all equal to eachother – user1318194 Mar 11 '13 at 6:01
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    @vsync Generally, to compare N distinct variables for equality (N > 1) you need N - 1 comparisons. – Ja͢ck May 9 '13 at 12:52
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Equality is a left-to-right precedence operation.

So:

1 == 1 == 1
true == 1
true

And:

1 === 1 === 1
true === 1
false // because triple-equals checks type as well
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