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Reading the title I know you would be pretty shocked as in why I am sure about head not being detached. I am not very used to GIT. There has been a change in the original repo I have made my clone from named upstream. I am trying to pull those changes by git pull, which says, Already up to date. I did,

git branch -r

origin/HEAD -> origin/master
origin/master
upstream/branchName
upstream/master

So my head is at origin master, which I think is fine. And doing,

cat .git/HEAD

gives

ref: refs/heads/master

All over Stack I see people referring it to a detached head problem. But I think that's not the case with me.
I had done a git fetch upstream yesterday which showed me compressing files and everything. But when I opened the repo in my editor I dont see any new changes fetched.

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git fetch fetches the commits but does not affect your HEAD position. You need to merge your local master with the upstream you want: git merge upstream/master (or git merge origin/master).

git pull normally does both git fetch and git merge for you, but it will abort if there is no new commits. Note that if you pull from other remotes like your upstream, you need to specify it, together with the branch to merge with: git pull upstream master

| improve this answer | |
  • I got all the files in my local after I did git merge upstream/master. It should affect my repo at github too right? The commit it lasts shows is not the latest one updated. – dibs_ab Mar 11 '13 at 9:16
  • Do comment if you know the reason to why it did not update my repo on github but updated on my local copy on my pc. Strange. – dibs_ab Mar 11 '13 at 9:31
  • I solved it by doing git push origin master Not a right way, but solved my problem. Do let me know if you know the reason to this @tapio – dibs_ab Mar 11 '13 at 9:37
  • @dibs_ab: All git actions apart from push and pull (and their friends such as fetch) operate solely on your local repo, offline. That's the beauty of distributed version control systems - no network access or latency on stuff like merge, log and diff. So your git push is in fact the correct way to sync to github. – Tapio Mar 11 '13 at 10:23

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