5

Previously, Google's Friend Connect required users to upload a couple of files to their websites to enable cross domain communication and Facebook Connect still requires you to upload a single file to enabled it.

Now, Friend Connect doesn't require any file upload... I was wondering how they were able to accomplish this.

Reference: http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/10/02/easy-does-it-google-friend-connect-one-ups-facebook-connects-install-wizard/

6

There are multiple methods of communicating between documents on different domains, amongst these HTML5 postMessage, NIX, FIM(hash/fragment), frameElement and by using the window.name property.

These are available on different browsers and in different versions, but collectively they allow you to do reliable XDM (cross domain messaging).

One project that have done this earlier is Apache Shindig, which probably pioneered quite a few of these, and more recently, the project easyXDM has come, unifying all of these approaches with a common API, making it easy to create complex applications using XDM and RPC.

You can read in depth about the various methods of transporting the data in this article at Script Junkie.

Now, to answer your question directly, earlier on it was quite common to believe that there was only postMessage, the FIM (Fragment Identifier Messaging) available, and for the latter to work efficiently, one often had to upload a special file to your domain. As more methods have been discovered, this has by many been deprecated as a technique, and hence; no more need for the file.

Just for the record; I'm the author of both the Script Junkie article, and the easyXDM library (that is what Twitter, Disqus and quite a few more are using by the way).

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  • +1. Someone downvoted my answer after all these years and I just noticed this. I'm sure I must of at least looked cursorily at how Friend Connect worked at the time, but must have missed this bit of the plumbing. I'll update my answer to clarify that yours is/was correct. – Dave Ward Nov 10 '14 at 3:15
4
+25

<edit>It's difficult to remember/verify now, but I believe my answer here was probably incorrect. Sean Kinsey's answer above should be the definitive answer to this question. If you're reading this, please upvote his answer and ignore mine.</edit>

The Google Friend Connect widget works like most ads/gadgets do, using a copy/pasted snippet of HTML to reference a JavaScript include on the host's server which then creates an iframe containing the desired content. By opening the iframe with your site ID in the URL, Google's server is able to generate the appropriate HTML document to represent a Friend Connect gadget for your particular site/settings.

There isn't any cross-site communication happening beyond that initial step of creating an iframe with the appropriate URL target. Everything inside the gadget's dynamically generated iframe is more like the user visited a separate page on Google's server, but what would have been displayed is then embedded/isolated in a block on your page instead.

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  • This is not correct - Google Friend Connect is based on the OpenSocial framework facilitating the pub/sub model and things like automatic resizing of the iframe to fit its content. It is literally based on XDM :) – Sean Kinsey Jan 9 '11 at 23:37
  • Such a shame that it's actually an erroneously answer that is awarded the bounty... – Sean Kinsey Jan 10 '11 at 13:42
0

I'm not sure how it works in this particular instance but cross-domain messaging can be accomplished either by the postMessage() API or by changing the hash part of the URL and monitoring that.

The hash change method works because both the enclosing and the enclosed pages have access to the enclosed page's URL.

Of course, hopefully the postMessage() API call becomes more standard over time.

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  • The enclosing document does not have access to the enclosed documents URL, it has write access to its location property. – Sean Kinsey Jan 9 '11 at 23:28
  • Interesting. Thanks for the clarification. – Anthony Mills Jan 10 '11 at 14:51
0

JSON allows cross-domain javascript.

  • Due to browser security restrictions, most "Ajax" requests are subject to the same origin policy; the request can not successfully retrieve data from a different domain, subdomain, or protocol.
  • Script and JSONP requests are not subject to the same origin policy restrictions.
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  • 1
    JSON is the format. Jquery will point to the url with a script tag (created on the fly). The script is expect to call a specific callback function in order to get the response. It is still subject to the same origin policy since it can't read the content of the page request. devlicio.us/blogs/scott_seely/archive/2010/09/07/… – h3xStream Jan 9 '11 at 3:00
  • JSONP is not comparable with postMessage or other Cross Document Messaging techniques as it is actually client-server centric rather than client-client centric as the others are. With JSONP you cannot facilitate two javascript Programs 'talking' to each other, just one Program and one server. – Sean Kinsey Jan 9 '11 at 23:34
0

There is no other method than using the somewindow.postMessage(); for communication between cross-domain iframes.

Before somewindow.postMessage() you had to upload file in order to ensure that you can establish communication between iframes.

example:

     <html>
<!-- this is main domain www.example.com -->
        <head>
        </head>
        <body>
      <iframe src="http://www.exampleotherdomain.com/">
      <script>
      function sendMsg(a) {

       var f = document.createElement('iframe'),
           k = document.getElementById('ifr');

           f.setAttribute('src', 'http://www.example.com/xdreciver.html#myValueisSent');
           k.appendChild(f);
           k.removeChild(f);
      }
      </script>


      <div id="ifr"></div>
      </iframe>
        </body>
        </html>

now the http://www.example.com/xdreciver.html html content :

     <html>
<!-- this is http://www.example.com/xdreciver.html -->
        <head>
      <script>
      function getMsg() {

             return window.location.hash;
      }
      </script>
        </head>
        <body onload="var msg = getMsg(); alert(msg);">



        </body>
        </html>

As for using the .postMessage(); its enough to use top.postMessage('my message to other domain document, which is also the main document', 'http://www.theotherdomain.com');

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  • As mentioned in my answer, there are quite a few more options for XDM than postMessage and FIM :) – Sean Kinsey Jan 9 '11 at 23:30

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