18

Design an efficient algorithm to sort 5 distinct - very large - keys less than 8 comparisons in the worst case. You can't use radix sort.

12
  • 8
    If this is homework, and it sounds like it, please tell us what you have done and where you are stuck. Oct 7 '09 at 23:22
  • it s not a homework question. Yes i m taking algorithm class but it s just a question i m curious. I asked a similar question before I was curious if there s a better worst case.
    – DarthVader
    Oct 7 '09 at 23:23
  • I find the median in 6 comparisons and i did two more comparisons, which is 8 again. I m curious if there s a better solution to this.
    – DarthVader
    Oct 7 '09 at 23:24
  • I m sure 8 is the worst case, using merge sort.
    – DarthVader
    Oct 7 '09 at 23:28
  • quicksort is also 8. Cant use insertion sort, selection sort, heapsort, bubble sort, and the linear time sorting algorithms, such as radix sort.
    – DarthVader
    Oct 7 '09 at 23:30

13 Answers 13

37

Compare A to B and C to D. WLOG, suppose A>B and C>D. Compare A to C. WLOG, suppose A>C. Sort E into A-C-D. This can be done with two comparisons. Sort B into {E,C,D}. This can be done with two comparisons, for a total of seven.

3
  • (a,b=> 1), (c,d=>1), (a,c=>1),(e, (a,c,d) => can be 3), (b, (e,c,d)=> can also be 3) Am i missing a point?
    – DarthVader
    Oct 8 '09 at 0:30
  • 1
    @unknown, to sort E into A-C-D, first compare E to C. Then if E>C compare E to A, otherwise compare E to D. Sorting B into {E,C,D} is the same.
    – Beta
    Oct 8 '09 at 0:44
  • 2
    This is known as Ford-Johnson algorithm aka merge insertion. This is the link for the related paper published in 1959. If you have trouble accessing the link, please search for "The tournament problem".
    – D. Jones
    Nov 8 '16 at 10:36
21

This is pseudocode based on Beta's answer. Might have some mistakes as I did this in a hurry.

if (A > B)
    swap A, B
if (C > D)
    swap C, D
if (A > C)
    swap A, C
    swap B, D  # Thanks Deqing!

if (E > C)
    if (E > D)  # A C D E
        if (B > D)
            if (B > E)
                return (A, C, D, E, B)
            else
                return (A, C, D, B, E)
         else
            if (B < C)
                return (A, B, C, D, E)
            else
                return (A, C, B, D, E)

    else  # A C E D
        if (B > E)
            if (B > D)
                return (A, C, E, D, B)
            else
                return (A, C, E, B, D)
         else
            if (B < C)
                return (A, B, C, E, D)
            else
                return (A, C, B, E, D)
else
    if (E < A)  # E A C D
        if (B > C)
            if (B > D)
                return (E, A, C, D, B)
            else
                return (E, A, C, B, D)
         else
             return (E, A, B, C, D)

    else  # A E C D
        if (B > C)
            if (B > D)
                return (A, E, C, D, B)
            else
                return (A, E, C, B, D)
         else
            if (B < E)
                return (A, B, E, C, D)
            else
                return (A, E, B, C, D)
5
  • 1
    i wish i could pick two right answers :) Thanks for the effort though. Appreciated.
    – DarthVader
    Oct 8 '09 at 1:27
  • I don't understand, how the first 3 comparison gets A-C-D? E.g. for ABCD as 9,10,1,2 the first 3 comparison get A,C,D as 1-9-2, not we expected. I guess the 3rd comparison should be swap A, C; swap B, D;
    – Deqing
    Jun 16 '14 at 4:03
  • Well spotted! If (A > C) then A may also be greater than D, but we can't be sure without a comparison. But swapping (A,B) with (C,D) solves the problem; afterwards we know A>B, A>C, and C>D. Edited my answer.
    – Artelius
    Jul 15 '14 at 2:47
  • this might fail for 1 1 2 2 1
    – Ray Tayek
    Feb 26 '15 at 5:43
  • 1
    I have tested it and it works correctly for 1 1 2 2 1, returning 1 1 1 2 2.
    – Artelius
    Mar 1 '15 at 23:56
8

It has to be 7 or more comparisons.

There are 120 (5 factorial) ways for 5 objects to be arranged. An algorithm using 6 comparisons can only tell apart 2^6 = 64 different initial arrangements, so algorithms using 6 or less comparisons cannot sort all possible inputs.

There may be a way to sort using only 7 comparisons. If you only want to sort 5 elements, such an algorithm could be found (or proved not to exist) by brute force.

1
  • Nice answer too, I already commented that I know It can be found with 7 Comparisons, but dont know how :)
    – DarthVader
    Oct 7 '09 at 23:45
7

Five item can be sorted with seven comparisons in the worst cast because log2(5!) = 6.9. I suggest to check if any standard sort sort algorithm achieves this number - if not it should be quite easy to hard-code a comparison sequence because of the low number of required comparisons.

I suggest to write a program to find the comparison sequence. Create a list with all 120 permutations of the numbers one to five. Then try all ten possible comparisons and select that one, that splits the list as good as possible in two equal sized lists. Perform this split and apply the same procedure to two lists recursively.

I wrote a small program to do this and here is the result.

Comparison 1: 0-1 [60|60] // First comparison item 0 with item 1, splits case 60/60
Comparison 2: 2-3 [30|30] // Second comparison for the first half of the first comparison
Comparison 3: 0-2 [15|15] // Third comparison for the first half of the second comparison for the first half of first comparison
Comparison 4: 2-4 [8|7]
Comparison 5: 3-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [4|3]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [1|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [8|7]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 3-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 0-3 [4|3]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 3: 0-3 [15|15] // Third comparison for the second half of the second comparison for the first half of first comparison
Comparison 4: 3-4 [8|7]
Comparison 5: 2-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [4|3]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [8|7]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 0-2 [4|3]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [1|2]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 2: 2-3 [30|30] // Second comparison for the second half of the first comparison
Comparison 3: 0-3 [15|15]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [7|8]
Comparison 5: 0-2 [3|4]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 4: 3-4 [7|8]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [3|4]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [1|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 2-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 3: 0-2 [15|15]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [7|8]
Comparison 5: 0-3 [3|4]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [1|2]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 3-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 4: 2-4 [7|8]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [3|4]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 5: 3-4 [4|4]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]

But now the question is how to implement this in an efficient way. Maybe one could use a look-up table to store the comparison sequence. I am also not sure how to derive the ordered output from this comparison sequence in an efficient way.

Sorting the result from above by the comparison reveals an obvious structure for the first comparisons, but it becomes harder with increasing comparison number. All blocks are symmetric around the middle indicated by -----.

Comparison 1: 0-1 [60|60]

Comparison 2: 2-3 [30|30]
Comparison 2: 2-3 [30|30]

Comparison 3: 0-2 [15|15]
Comparison 3: 0-3 [15|15]
-----
Comparison 3: 0-3 [15|15]
Comparison 3: 0-2 [15|15]

Comparison 4: 2-4 [8|7]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [8|7]
Comparison 4: 3-4 [8|7]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [8|7]
-----
Comparison 4: 0-4 [7|8]
Comparison 4: 3-4 [7|8]
Comparison 4: 0-4 [7|8]
Comparison 4: 2-4 [7|8]

Comparison 5: 3-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [4|3]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-3 [4|3]
Comparison 5: 2-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [4|3]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-2 [4|3]
-----
Comparison 5: 0-2 [3|4]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [3|4]
Comparison 5: 2-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-3 [3|4]
Comparison 5: 1-4 [4|4]
Comparison 5: 0-4 [3|4]
Comparison 5: 3-4 [4|4]

Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [1|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 3-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [1|2]
-----
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [1|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 2-4 [1|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 3-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|1]
Comparison 6: 1-2 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-4 [2|2]
Comparison 6: 1-3 [2|2]

Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
-----
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 2-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 0-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 3-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-3 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-4 [1|1]
Comparison 7: 1-2 [1|1]
1
  • Nice answer, I know that. Using comparison tree. There are 5! possible answer which is log120. But which algorithm to find this route?
    – DarthVader
    Oct 7 '09 at 23:42
4

FWIW, here's a compact and easy to follow Python version with tests to make sure it works:

def sort5(a, b, c, d, e):
    'Sort 5 values with 7 Comparisons'
    if a < b:      a, b = b, a
    if c < d:      c, d = d, c
    if a < c:      a, b, c, d = c, d, a, b
    if e < c:
        if e < d:  pass
        else:      d, e = e, d
    else:
        if e < a:  c, d, e = e, c, d
        else:      a, c, d, e = e, a, c, d
    if b < d:
        if b < e:  return b, e, d, c, a
        else:      return e, b, d, c, a
    else:
        if b < c:  return e, d, b, c, a
        else:      return e, d, c, b, a

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from itertools import permutations

    assert all(list(sort5(*p)) == sorted(p) for p in permutations(range(5)))
3

According to Wikipedia:

Determining the exact number of comparisons needed to sort a given number of entries is a computationally hard problem even for small n, and no simple formula for the solution is known."

Presumably this means there is no known tractable (efficient) algorithm for determining an exactly optimal comparison sort.

1
  • 1
    He doesn't need a formula, just the answer for n=5. The quote says that it's a hard problem even for small n, but it doesn't mean that small. There's a hard lower limit of 7 on the worst case, and a known solution that gets it in 7 at worst. Who cares how hard it is for n=6? Oct 8 '09 at 10:37
3

Sorting networks have a restricted structure, so don't answer the original question; but they're fun.
List of Sorting Networks generates nice diagrams or lists of SWAPs for up to 32 inputs. For 5, it gives

There are 9 comparators in this network, grouped into 6 parallel operations.  
[[0,1],[3,4]]  
[[2,4]]  
[[2,3],[1,4]]  
[[0,3]]  
[[0,2],[1,3]]  
[[1,2]]
2

I have written a C implementation of the solution to this problem which can be found here: Sorting 5 elements using 7 comparisons

My code is well commented with an explanation of why it is working.

1

Sample sequence of operations, using mergesort (the merge function below will merge two sorted sublists into a single sorted combined list):

elements[1..2] <- merge(elements[1..1], elements[2..2]) # 1 comparison
elements[3..4] <- merge(elements[3..3], elements[4..4]) # 1 comparison
elements[3..5] <- merge(elements[3..4], elements[5..5]) # 1-2 comparisons
elements[1..5] <- merge(elements[1..2], elements[3..5]) # 2-4 comparisons
1

Others have stated that there are 5! = 120 arrangements (permutations) to handle, so you need 7 comparisons. To identify the permutation, in principle, you can construct a big nested if statement 7 comparisons deep. Having identified the permutation, a precalculated swap/rotation sequence can be applied.

The first problem is that the choice of second comparison depends on the result of the first comparison and so on. The trick at each stage is to choose a good comparison to divide the current set of possible permutations into two equal subsets. Simplest approach - evaluate the split that each comparison would achieve until you find a suitably balanced one. Exit early if you find a perfect balance, but be aware that perfect balance won't always be possible as we don't have exactly 2^7=128 permutations - in some (I assume 8) cases, we only need six comparisons.

The second problem is designing the swap/rotation sequences for each of the 120 possible permutations, and that's probably a dynamic programming thing. Probably requires recursive search of an if-I-do-this, the next result is that, then recurse "game tree", and you should really cache intermediate results IOW. Too tired to figure out the details ATM, sorry.

You might put all the steps into a digraph that fans out (identifying the permutation), then fans back in (applying each reordering step). Then, probably run it through a digraph minimisation algorithm.

Wrap this up in a code generator and you're done - your own algorithmically near-perfect 5 item sorter. The digraph stuff kind of implies gotos in the generated code (esp. if you minimise), but people tend to turn a blind eye to that in generated code.

Of course all this is a bit brute force, but why bother with elegance and efficiency - odds are you'll only run the working generator once anyway, and the problem size is small enough to be achievable (though probably not if you do independent naive "game tree" searches for each permutation).

1

A B C D E

A
| C D E     - 1 Comparison
B

A C
| | E       - 1 Comparison
B D

  A
 / \
B   C   E   - 1 Comparison
     \
      D

E needs 3 comparisons. It should be compared to A, C, D

Try A-C-D-E in that order.

Overall there will be nine comparisons -- not very performant.

5
  • 1
    Huh?! Who posts a screenshot of their Word document on a programming site? Oct 8 '09 at 1:15
  • Ben. What s the big deal ? How am i supposed to draw that using SO thingies.
    – DarthVader
    Oct 8 '09 at 1:18
  • I actually like this. Change of scenery is not bad every once in a while.
    – Rook
    Oct 8 '09 at 1:44
  • Use the <pre> tags to get fixed-width text without formatting.
    – Artelius
    Oct 8 '09 at 22:23
  • Fixed it for you. If you click 'edit', you'll be able to see what I did. Please refrain from using images in the future -- they aren't searchable, and they're dependent upon whatever you're saving the image to always being available. Oct 21 '09 at 23:44
0

Here is C++ implementation which sorts 5 elements in <= 7 comparisons. Was able to find 8 cases which can be sorted in 6 comparisons. That makes sense if we imagine full binary tree with 120 leaf nodes, there will be 112 nodes at level 7 and 8 leaf nodes at level 6. Here is the full code that is tested to work for all possible permutations.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cmath>
#include <cassert>
#include <numeric>

using namespace std;

ostream& operator << ( ostream& os, vector<int> v )
{
    cout << "[ ";
    for ( auto x: v ) cout << x << ' ';
    cout << "]";
    return os;
}

class Comp {
    int count;
public:
    Comp(): count{0}{}
    bool isLess( vector<int> v, int i, int j ) {
        count++;
        //cout << v << "Comparison#" << count << ": " << i << ", " << j << endl;
        return v[ i ] < v[ j ];
    }
    int getCount() { return count; }
};


int mySort( vector<int> &v )
{
    Comp c;
    if ( c.isLess( v, 1, 0 ) ) {
        swap( v[ 0 ], v[ 1 ] );
    }
    if ( c.isLess( v, 3, 2 ) ) {
        swap( v[ 2 ], v[ 3 ] );
    }
    // By now (0, 1) (2, 3) (4)
    if ( c.isLess( v, 0, 2 ) ) {
        // ( 0, 2, 3 ) (1)
        swap( v[ 1 ], v[ 2 ] );
        swap( v[ 2 ], v[ 3 ] );
    } else {
        // ( 2, 0, 1 ) ( 3 )
        swap( v[ 1 ], v[ 2 ] );
        swap( v[ 0 ], v[ 1 ] );
    }
    // By now sorted order ( 0, 1, 2 ) ( 3 ) ( 4 ) and know that 3 > 0
    if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 1 ) ) {
        if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 0 ) ) {
            // ( 4, 0, 1, 2 ) ( 3 ) ( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin(), v[4] );
            // By now ( 0, 1, 2, 3 ) ( 4 ) ( ... ) and know that 4 > 1
            if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 2 ) ) {
                // ( 0, 1, 4, 2, 3 ) ( ... )
                v.insert( v.begin() + 2, v[4] );
            } else {
                if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 3 ) ) {
                    // ( 0, 1, 2, 4, 3 ) ( ... )
                    v.insert( v.begin() + 3, v[4] );
                } else {
                    // ( 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 ) ( ... )
                    v.insert( v.begin() + 4, v[4] );
                }
            }
            // ( 1 2 3 4 5 ) and trim the rest
            v.erase( v.begin()+5, v.end() );
            return c.getCount(); /////////// <--- Special case we could been done in 6 comparisons
        } else {
            // ( 0, 4, 1, 2 ) ( 3 ) ( ... ) 
            v.insert( v.begin() + 1, v[4] );
        }
    } else {
        if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 2 ) ) {
            // ( 0, 1, 4, 2 ) ( 3 ) ( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin() + 2, v[4] );
        } else {
            // ( 0, 1, 2, 4 ) ( 3 ) ( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin() + 3, v[4] );
        }
    }
    // By now ( 0, 1, 2, 3 ) ( 4 )( ... ): with 4 > 0
    if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 2 ) ) {
        if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 1 ) ) {
            // ( 0, 4, 1, 2, 3 )( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin() + 1, v[4] );
        } else {
            // ( 0, 1, 4, 2, 3 )( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin() + 2, v[4] );
        }
    } else {
        if ( c.isLess( v, 4, 3 ) ) {
            // ( 0, 1, 2, 4, 3 )( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin() + 3, v[4] );
        } else {
            // ( 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 )( ... )
            v.insert( v.begin() + 4, v[4] );
        }
    }
    v.erase( v.begin()+5, v.end() );
    return c.getCount();
}

#define TEST_ALL
//#define TEST_ONE

int main()
{
#ifdef TEST_ALL
    vector<int> v1(5);
    iota( v1.begin(), v1.end(), 1 );
    do {
        vector<int> v2 = v1, v3 = v1;
        int count = mySort( v2 );
        if ( count == 6 )
            cout << v3 << " => " << v2 << " #" << count << endl;
    } while( next_permutation( v1.begin(), v1.end() ) );
#endif

#ifdef TEST_ONE
    vector<int> v{ 1, 2, 3, 1, 2};
    mySort( v );
    cout << v << endl;
#endif
}
0

For sorting networks, it is not possible to have less than 9 comparisons to sort 5 items when the input is not known. The lower bound has been proven for sorting networks up to 10. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorting_network.

Correctness of sorting networks could be verified by the Zero-one principle as mentioned in The Art of Computer Programming, Vol 3 by Knuth. That is, if a sorting network can correctly sort all permutations of 0s and 1s, then it is a correct sorting network. None of the algorithms mentioned on this post passed the Zero-one test.

In addition, the lower bound says that comparison based sorts cannot have less than ceil(log(n!)) comparators to correctly sort, however, it does not mean that this is achievable.

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