2

I have a simple game in the making, I basically have a zombie class that I've put in a group so I can have multiple instances of it indefinitely:

class zombie(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    def __init__(self):
        pygame.sprite.Sprite.__init__(self,zombiegroup)
        self.pos=(random.randrange(5,695),random.randrange(5,455))
        self.image=zombie_image
        self.rimage=self.image
        self.rect=self.image.get_rect().move(self.pos)
        self.speed=5


    def update(self):
        zx=self.rect.topleft[0]-player.rect[0]
        zy=self.rect.topleft[1]-player.rect[1]
        rads=math.atan2(-zy, zx)
        rads %= 2*pi
        angle = math.degrees(rads)
        self.rimage=pygame.transform.rotate(self.image, angle-90)
        size=self.rimage.get_size()

        if player.rect[0]<self.rect[0]:
            self.rect[0]-=self.speed

        if player.rect[0]>self.rect[0]:
            self.rect[0]+=self.speed

        if player.rect[1]<self.rect[1]:
            self.rect[1]-=self.speed

        if player.rect[1]>self.rect[1]:
            self.rect[1]+=self.speed


        screen.blit(self.rimage, (self.rect.topleft[0]-size[0]/2,self.rect.topleft[1]-size[1]/2))

and my group is just:

zombiegroup=pygame.sprite.Group()

It's quite basic but I'd like to know how to test that if each of these zombies collide with each other, otherwise after a while of chasing they all merge into a single zombie on screen. I just don't know how to handle the group to do that, or even if I should be using the pygame group.

Thanks guys,

Alex

1

The fastest, but dirty method is to keep track of rectangles that are slightly smaller than the zombies themselves and check if they collide. Checking pixel by pixel causes a huge hit to FPS.

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